Vancouver Paralympic Village

Smart Site Selection — The village, which will be home to athletes and officials at Games time, was a catalyst for the redevelopment of a former industrial area, and included preserving the waterfront for public use; ecological restoration of the shoreline; reintroducing intertidal marine habitat and indigenous vegetation; eliminating previous on-site contaminants; and restoring a heritage building. The end result: a fully integrated, socially inclusive community that will, after the Games, be home to 15,000.
Energy Efficiency — A Neighbourhood Energy Utility system uses heat captured from the sanitary sewer’s main line to serve the village’s heat and hot water needs. A Net-Zero Energy Building pilot project for one of the city’s affordable housing buildings will include energy consumption monitoring, solar recovery, waste-heat capture and reuse and energy conservation standards above LEED.
Stormwater Management and Green Roofs — Stormwater management initiatives include green roofs, bio-swales, permeable pavers, infiltration galleries, rainwater collection/reuse and surface drainage elements (minimal pipes). Green roofs are targeted for a minimum of 50 per cent of the total building footprint, providing natural insulation, stormwater management, habitat and opportunities for rooftop gardening.
Green Buildings — The City of Vancouver is targeting Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) “Gold” green building certification for all new buildings and the site’s heritage Salt Building. For the venue’s community centre, LEED “Platinum” is targeted.
Accessible Design — Units will showcase universal design elements, such as wider doorways, hallways and stairs that are easily adapted for complete accessibility.
Community Benefits — During construction, a community benefits agreement between the City of Vancouver, Millennium Properties (the village’s developer) and a local non-profit society provided 100 jobs, $750,000 in training and $15 million in procurement for inner-city residents and businesses.
Aboriginal Art —This venue will feature a selection of art showcased as part of the Vancouver 2010 Venues’ Aboriginal Art Program, which includes traditional and contemporary artwork by Four Host First Nations, First Nations, Inuit and Métis artists from across Canada.
Legacy Housing — Following the Games, the village will provide the Vancouver community with a legacy of 250 affordable housing units.
Sustainable Transportation — The waterfront redevelopment comprises the newest section of the Seaside Greenway/Bikeway, part of Vancouver’s 22-kilometre Seawall. Streets have been designed for pedestrians and bicycles first. Car co-op vehicles and electric hookups are accommodated in underground parking areas.

Community Legacies

After the Games, the Olympic and Paralympic Village Vancouver will be the first phase of a model sustainable community known as Southeast False Creek. It will house approximately 3,000 residents in 1,100 units, including 250 affordable housing units and 100 rental units. It will become a complete community with shopping and services available in commercial spaces surrounding the community plaza. Other amenities will include parks, a community centre with a non-motorized boating facility, and a restored heritage building.

Sustainability Attributes

This project will transform a former industrial brownfield area into a showcase of sustainable living. It will certify under the new LEED for Neighbourhood Development pilot to LEED Gold standard. Each building site will also certify to LEED Gold standard for new construction, except for the community centre, which will certify to LEED Platinum level — making it one of the highest-rated environmentally designed buildings in Canada. The project is also to be certified under the SAFER homes standard, meaning that all units will be readily adaptable for accessible living.

  • The design of the Vancouver Village and surrounding landscape won the Federation of Canadian Municipalities Award for Sustainable Transportation in 2006. The award was given for the Village’s Sustainable Transportation Plan based on City Council's transportation hierarchy of pedestrians first, then cyclists, then public transit, and then local/shared automobile use.
  • The City of Vancouver is targeting LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) green building certification for all new buildings. The community centre at this venue is targeting LEED Platinum certification — making it one of the highest-rated environmentally designed buildings in Canada. For all other buildings on-site, the City is targeting LEED Gold.
  • Demonstrating smart site selection, the Village is a catalyst for the redevelopment of a former industrial area through the ecological restoration of the shoreline and contaminated lands, and the reduction/elimination of contaminants potentially entering the aquatic environment.
  • The creation of significant wildlife habitat through green space and foreshore rehabilitation, which includes the reintroduction of an intertidal marine habitat and the planting of
    indigenous vegetation.
  • A neighbourhood energy utility will serve the Village’s space heat and hot water generation needs, using heat captured from the main line of the sanitary sewer.
  • A Net-Zero Energy Building pilot project for one of the city’s affordable housing buildings will include energy consumption monitoring, solar recovery, waste-heat capture and reuse, and above-LEED standards in energy conservation.
  • Green roofs are targeted for a minimum 50 per cent of the building’s total footprint.
  • Water efficiency programs will minimize reliance on the municipal system by harvesting rainwater for building use, resulting in overall potable water consumption reduction of 40 to 50 per cent.
  • Buildings will include car share vehicles and electric vehicle hook ups.

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