More line up for Britain’s first Vintage Computer Festival 19-20 June

9 June 2010

Chip-tune music, retro design, a big name from 1980s and a challenge with a 1960s computer are the latest additions to the programme for Britain’s first-ever Vintage Computer Festival at The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park on 19-20 June 2010.

Originating a decade ago in California’s Silicon Valley, Vintage Computing Festivals are now regular events in the USA and in Germany. The event at TNMOC will be the first in the UK and is open to the general public.

VCF organiser Simon Hewitt of TNMOC said “Interest continues to exceed our expectations and it’s clear that this is no longer just being seen as a Great Geek Day Out. It’s definitely one for even the slightly tecchie family.  We recommend that people come early on both days as they are going to have lots to see, hear and get their interactive fingers on!

“The latest additions are Matthew Applegate / Pixelh8 who will be giving a presentation about Obsolete? his musical composition that uses TNMOC computers as musical instruments, Dragon Computers from the 1980s micro-revolution, and retro-aesthetic designers Big Dog Interactive. There will also be a special computer challenge, allowing visitors to pit their wits against an Elliott computer from the 1960s.”

The entrance fee for the entire weekend is just £10 and free to TNMOC individual members – see www.justgiving.com/MuseumMembership.

VCF speakers include:

  • Sophie Wilson, the brains behind Acorn Computers.
  • Paul Humphreys and Andy McCluskey, founder members of Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark – tickets now sold out for their talk and performance.
  • Matthew Applegate, Pixelh8, composer of Obsolete? which uses many of the TNMOC computers and machines as musical instruments. Tickets available on the day.
  • Christine Finn, print and broadcast journalist and author of “Artifacts: an archaeologist’s year in Silicon Valley”.
  • Tony Sale, leader of the Colossus rebuild team and a driving force behind saving Bletchley Park and the birth of TNMOC.
  • Tony Frazer, restoration team leader of what will be the world’s oldest original functioning computer, the Harwell WITCH computer.
  • Plus the author David Ahl, Peter Onion on the 1960’s Elliott, Delwyn Holroyd on the big beast computers of the 1970s and 80s, Adam Bradley on the really big beast supercomputers of the 1980s, Chris Smith on the 1980s’ Sinclair micros, and Karl Pantling-James on the early days of computer gaming.


VCF exhibitors include:

  • Acorn World
  • Arcade Gaming
  • Amiga 25th Anniversary User Community – including NEW Amiga X1000 launch
  • Big Dog Interactive – retro-aesthetic designers
  • The Centre for Computing History
  • Computing and Gaming Events Union (CGEU) – R3PLAY preview
  • Computing Generations – the Jim Austin collection
  • Dragon Archive
  • Dec Machines from the 90s
  • IBM System/360
  • Microretro.com
  • MK Amateur Radio Society
  • Retro Computer Museum
  • Robotics
  • The SpectraNet Project
  • Spectrum Computing
  • ZX Spectrum ULA
  • 1940s Digital Clock.

To keep up-to-date, see www.tnmoc.org/vcf-gb.aspx and Facebook Vintage Computer Festival
For general enquiries and to join the mailing list, email vcf@tnmoc.org.

Latest information about VCF: www.tnmoc.org
Twitter: @tnmoc


About The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park

The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park, an independent charity, houses the largest collection of functional historic computers in Europe, including a rebuilt Colossus, the world’s first electronic programmable computer.

The Museum complements the Bletchley Park Trust’s story of code breaking up to the Colossus and allows visitors to follow the development of computing from the ultra-secret pioneering efforts of the 1940s through the mainframes of the 1960s and 1970s, and the rise of personal computing in the 1980s. New working exhibits are regularly unveiled and the public can already view a rebuilt and fully operational Colossus, the restoration of the Harwell / WITCH computer, and an ICL 2966, one of the workhorse mainframes computers of the 1980s, plus many of the earliest desktops of the 1980s and 1990s. The latest display is the much-talked-about Technology of the Internet gallery. In June 2010 TNMOC will host Britain’s first-ever Vintage Computer Festival.

Funders of the Museum include BCS, PGP Corporation, IBM, NPL, HP Labs, InsightSoftware.com, Black Marble, and the School of Computer Science at the University of Hertfordshire.

The Museum is currently open on Thursdays and Saturdays from 1pm, and on Bank Holidays in spring and summer. Groups may visit at other times by arrangement.

For more information, see www.tnmoc.org and follow @tnmoc on Twitter.

Media Contacts

Stephen Fleming at Palam Communications
t +44 (0) 1635 299116
e sfleming@palam.co.uk

 

Story created on the 09/06/2010

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