What Can't You Do?

Posted on February 14, 2009 8:00 AM by Joel Comm

I get asked for joint ventures all the time. A day doesn't go by without some message landing in my mailbox from someone saying they've got a killer product and that I should tell my entire list about it.

And each of those days ends with just about all of those emails landing in my trash box.

Yes, some products I'll be happy to recommend to people who are trying to build Internet businesses. Usually, they'll have come from people I know, people I've met at conferences and people who arrive with personal recommendations themselves.

The products will always have blown my socks off. Before I stand by them, they need to have made me slap my forehead and wonder why I didn't think of the idea first.

But these aren't joint ventures. They're carefully chosen affiliate relationships. My only contribution to the success of the relationship is to tell everyone that this is a tool or a strategy that they should have.

A real joint venture is about more than bringing a market to a product. It's about bringing together partners whose skills complement each other.

When I first came across the site that would become Yahoo! Games, for example, the place was a mess. The idea was fantastic and the games were great but no one was playing them. The guy who had built it was a very talented coder but he was a terrible marketer.

I knew that I could bring players into games like these and I knew where the improvements should be made. But I also knew that if I tried to code games like these myself, they would have more bugs than a Brazilian rainforest.

We teamed up. He brought one skill, I brought another and we achieved together something that neither of us could have achieved alone.

Success in Internet marketing is usually the result of a series of joint ventures. You'll have affiliate relationships too but it's the JVs that will form the foundation of your business.

To create those relationships, you have to understand the strengths that you can bring to the partnership - and you have to recognize and accept that there are some things you're better off trusting someone else to do with you.

6 Comments For This Post

  1. jerald henke Says:

    How true this is Joel. You also need to put in that along with trust there is an honor code and reputations at stake. There are too many marketers out there that are just in it for themselves and utilizing what and who they can to get ahead or to get the other persons list.I am not an internet marketer yet but in my research and signing up for other marketers I am receiving emails from marketers I don't know and don't care about so I know my email address was sold and that turns me off of the original marketer I signed up with and I go back and unsubscribe because I do not want anything to do with a marketer that I cannot trust. I am a person and not just another opt-in for money in your pocket. I am a divorced father of two and am very choosy with whom I spend my money with for my education and my future internet business. Thank you for this opportunity to rant and get some anger out on this subject and I hope I didn't take up to much of your time.

  2. kim Says:

    Yes thank you very much Mr Joel for this great blog, just keep up the good work...I'm enjoying reading your posts :)

  3. Anonymous Says:

    Joel, you are right on the mark on this article. It is so hard to do everything yourself these days, especially because information travls so quick. It's hard to do something new and innovative these days without being copied and improved upon. So definitely collaboration is the key to success.

    I think the hard part is finding the right partner and working together well. I am trying to find someone myself to help me market my product.

  4. Joe Says:

    Great Post.......

    You also need to put in that along with trust there is an honor code and reputations at stake. There are too many marketers out there that are just in it for themselves and utilizing what and who they can to get ahead or to get the other persons list.I am not an internet marketer yet but in my research and signing up for other marketers I am receiving emails from marketers I don't know and don't care about so I know my email address was sold and that turns me off of the original marketer I signed up with and I go back and unsubscribe because I do not want anything to do with a marketer that I cannot trust. I am a person and not just another opt-in for money in your pocket. I am a divorced father of two and am very choosy with whom I spend my money with for my education and my future internet business. Thank you for this opportunity to rant and get some anger out on this subject and I hope I didn't take up to much of your time.

  5. free online adventure games Says:

    Your description of the first group of people reminds me of people who don't really have an idea how to do marketing and try to leech on to someone who has enough connections to help them do their marketing, without any credit given to the one who will help them do that. I guess that's why more than anything else, what's needed aren't these leeching relationships, but strategic partnerships as you have said, that require a co-dependency on one another to move towards success.

  6. pkshops Says:


    Joel!

    joint ventures are useful but they also need some form
    of communication. So do not under-estimate you email in-box.

    lolz.


    thanks for sharing.
    qammar
    for pkshops

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