Categorized | Features, Top Stories

The Art and History of Tea Bagging

By Najib Aminy

 Stony Brook senior Adam Felline is unlike most video game fanatics. He is not a virgin, or at least he claims not to be. Yet Felline finds himself in the same boat with millions of gamers sailing the waters of foul mouthing, poor sportsmanship, and lewd behavior, of which the most notable is tea bagging. 

In the continually evolving world of video games lies the ritualistic tradition that marks the ultimate humiliation for any victim and a momentary ecstasy for the victor. Akin to celebratory dances in professional sports, tea bagging is the repetitive crouching motion over a deceased player’s face, mirroring that of a tea bag placed into a mug. 

Tea bagging was developed in 1908 when New York tea importer Thomas Sullivan sent tealeaves in gauze packages. Sullivan’s clients would dip their packages into the warm water and shortly after enjoy their imported tea. Alas, tea bagging was born. 

According to Urban Dictionary, a user submitted slang dictionary website, tea bagging is the act of a man inserting his “scrotum into another person’s mouth in the fashion of a teabag into a mug with an up/down (in/out) motion.”

Tea bagging gained prominence in the 1998 comedy, Pecker, which displayed a male stripper performing the tea bagging motion to another man’s forehead. Quite gay, yes, but as tea bagging developed into another peculiar fetish in bondage, discipline, submission and masochism culture, it would later be endorsed by the hip hop culture. Three-time Grammy Award winner Ludacris dedicated a track to tea bagging on his 2004 album Chicken and Beer. The skit was titled, “T Baggin” and is about a phone service in which the user presses the number seven indicating that they had “woke up with a hang over and a pair of hairy balls on their face.” More recently, in 2006, hip-hop group Trap Squad released their song titled, “Teabag Dat Hoe,” a song about one’s experience with tea-bagging women. A lyric from Trap Squad’s song reads, “I ain’t trynna’ fuck you hoe I want my balls to meet yo’ lip. Yo’ throat be like some chips so my nuts is what I dip if you do a good job I might just leave dat hoe a tip.”

As of late, tea bagging has been subjected to a wider audience through online game play, primarily with first-person-shooter games such as Battlefield, Call of Duty, and Halo. According to Giantbomb.com, a video-gaming website, tea bagging was first introduced in Ubisoft’s Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon, which was released on the major video game platforms by early 2003. Now in 2008, the ability to tea bag appears in 54 games ranging from games like Call of Duty 4, Gears of War, Halo 3, and even Super Smash Brothers.  With the advancement of technology, video gamers can now experience virtual tea bagging with services such as Xbox Live, a network where gamers can play against each other through the Internet. Behind the TV screen blaring gunshots and a headset that allows players to enhance their “trash talking skills,” many gamers separate themselves from reality, and this may cause a problem with some.

Despite Xbox Live refusing to officially comment on the act of tea bagging, an Xbox Live Support agent named Carlos explained that there are consequences to players who express poor sportsmanship. Carlos, who would not give out his last name due to Xbox Live customer support policy, said that players have the option of leaving feedback to other gamers. If a certain gamer gets a certain amount of feedback within a given amount of time then that player will be notified and suspended from any Xbox Live game play for a given time frame that may last up to about a month.

 

Felline during the act of teabagging

Felline during the act of tea bagging

Ignoring the consequences, many gamers find that screaming expletives, racial slurs, and insulting the mothers of other gamers’ is all part of the experience, but when it comes to tea bagging, it is taken more seriously due in part of what many gamers agree to be a respected art. Senior Adam Felline, of Staten Island, sees tea bagging as an art that requires much time and dedication in executing properly. Felline mentions that in order to be truly good at games such as Halo, Call of Duty, and Gears of War, one must be good at tea bagging. If one lacks the skill of tea bagging, then according to Felline, one can never really be good at any game. “It is completely impossible. If you are good at the actual game then you are an all-star at tea-bagging.” Felline is an avid tea-bagger who specifically mentioned tea-bagging Xbox Live gamer “Creasy Bearr.” (“Creasy Bearr” was unavailable for comment.)  Felline’s description of tea bagging as “an orgasm,” could be agreed upon by many gamers, but when one is the victim of tea bagging, the feeling is “like a little school girl being violated.” The goal and top priority for Felline and many tea baggers alike is to win the game and then tea bag later. In spending countless hours of refining his tea bagging skills, Felline says that he, “Creasy Bearr,” and “Petepetefire” have mastered tea bagging and challenge anyone brave enough to take them on.

Yet on the other side of the fence lies the group of gamers who see tea bagging as excessive, unnecessary, and pointless. Senior David DePouli, of Port Washington, sees tea bagging as something that “detracts from the gaming experience.” DePouli is proud of the fact that he has never tea bagged any one in a video game and sees tea bagging as something “very demoralizing and insulting. Nothing boils my blood like someone sitting on my face after they’ve just killed me.” DePouli also stated that there are many gamers who use the tea-bagging maneuver despite the fact that they may be the worst player in a given match. DePouli plays the game for the sake of playing the game and prefers not to showboat or create any momentary feuds. When asked about a given instance of a stellar player who chooses to tea bag, DePouli was not fazed, saying that it is good for him. “That is the beauty of the game, he can play it how he wants to.” DePouli chooses to travel the calm and collective manner and sees himself as verbally and intellectually superior. Viewing tea bagging as possibly the worst thing in Xbox Live play, DePouli sees that as a good thing in that it is not that big of a deal. DePouli has come to a realization that everyone has the right to enjoy the game as they choose to. “Everybody pays their $60 for a game, so who am I say to they can’t enjoy something as stupid as tea bagging.” All in all, DePouli has learned to cope with tea bagging as well as excessive taunts and trash-talking. Gamers take advantage of Xbox Live’s service, which offers, as DePouli puts, “a level of security where people can act out, can talk trash, tea bag you, and there are no repercussions really, and I am not surprised that young gamers and even old gamers continue to do it. I don’t let it detract from my experience.”

Despite where one stands on the issue of tea bagging, it is important to fully understand the true art of tea bagging. Many times novice and inexperienced gamers jump eagerly to a newly deceased body to enjoy a momentary ecstasy, yet they do it all wrong. The proper tea bag lies in simplicity, location, and timeliness. For one, the tea bag is to be a simple act; there is no need to form clans in learning to synchronize tea bagging. In addition, excessive jumping, crouching, and bashing of the deceased body would take away points from a perfect ten. Simply approach the deceased body, position oneself over the head area of the body, and place oneself on top of the deceased body’s face region. Then cautiously proceed in a repeating crouch motion with the seasoning of an occasional beat down, nothing more.

Location is something that many people ignore due in part to the rush of just trying to reach a deceased body and tea bag said body before a player from the opposing team discovers you. Rather than positioning one’s body over the face, players often situate themselves on the abdomen or leg region of the deceased player’s body. This would result in a huge deduction of style points and would clearly indicate to any person witnessing such a tea bag that you are a douche and should return not only the video game which you are playing, but the system, and never play video games again. Also, if the body is face down, ignore it. There is no satisfaction of dry humping the back or buttocks of a deceased player, it does not work; only face up. Remember, location, location, location.

Timeliness is another important factor when it comes to the physical crouching. One must judge through mass amounts of experience the appropriate time increments between crouching and releasing. A tea bag that is performed with a very fast CPS, or crouches per second, would be deemed poor. It tells the gamer and any witness that you are in a rush or hurry and that you do not value the true art of tea bagging. A slow CPS can work if executed perfectly however with a slow CPS one would increase the TOA, or threat of attack.

The ideal tea bag would be where a player plants himself squarely on the face of the deceased player, crouches in appropriate increments, touched up with an occasional beat down. Too many beat downs and deductions will arise. One should also be cautious with jumping since it takes away from the precious seconds of humiliation for the victim. One will know that they have performed the perfect tea bag when the head of the lifeless body bobs up and down from the ground. At this point, one should return to game play in hopes of repeating the same action.

Tea bagging, like any other form of taunt or trash talk, allows gamers to express themselves in ways that they could not before. Some see this as a way of making video games more competitive while others see it as unnecessary. Tea bagging can capture the best of times for one player and indicate the worst of times. Yet as Felline put it, “all is fair in love and war.”

No related posts.

This post was written by:

The Press - who has written 483 posts on The Stony Brook Press.


Contact the author

Comments are closed.