Hanomag 2-10 PS- 1926



Hanomag was an established name when the company produced its first car.  They built their first steam engine in 1836; by 1905 they were producing steam trucks.  When the steam locomotive market declined, the company began looking for an alternative product.  They turned to a small economy car that was affordable among the middle class.  The car was advertised as a 2/10 ps, but its odd looks earned it the nickname “Kommissbrot.”  Two structural details were responsible for the unusual appearance:
(1) to make the seat as wide as possible for two people, the running boards were eliminated, and (2) by mounting the engine in the rear, it provided ample leg room for the passengers.  The Kommissbrot was taken out of production after the Austin Seven appeared on the German market as it was a four seater and sold for a price less than that of the Hanomag.

Specifications:
Manufacturer:  Hannoversche Maschinenbau, GA
Country of Origin:  Germany
Drivetrain Configuration: Rear engine, rear wheel drive
Engine:  1 cylinder, water cooled, 10hp
Transmission:  3 speed manual
Top Speed:  40 miles per hour
Years of Production:  1924-28
Number Produced:  15,775
Original Cost:  2,800 Marks

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