Thomson Buildings


Adelaide, Australia
Airdrie, Lanarkshire
Annan, Dumfriesshire
Baillieston
Balfron and Holm of Balfron, Stirlingshire
Bearsden, Dunbartonshire
Blairmore, Argyllshire
Blantyre, Lanarkshire
Bothwell, Lanarkshire
Busby, Lanarkshire
Cathcart
Clynder
Cove, Dunbartonshire
Craigmore, Rothesay, Isle of Bute
Dalmuir, Dunbartonshire
Dullatur, Dunbartonshire
Dunoon
Duntocher, Dunbartonshire
Eastwood
Edinburgh
Glasgow
Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire
Hyderabad, Deccan, India
Johnstone, Renfrewshire
Kilcreggan, Dunbartonshire
Kirkintilloch, Dunbartonshire
Langbank, Renfrewshire
Lenzie, Dunbartonshire / Lanarkshire
London
Montrose, Forfarshire
Newton Mearns, Renfrewshire
Paisley, Renfrewshire
Rothesay, Isle of Bute
Rutherglen, Lanarkshire
Strathaven, Lanarkshire
Uddingston, Lanarkshire

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The following list is arranged in by modern street addresses; when a commercial building or block of tenements runs along more than one street, the name placed alphabetically is that of the principal street range. Contiguous buildings are listed together, even when in different streets.

For places outside the modern Glasgow City boundary, the historic counties of Scotland are used.

The cost of the job and the name of the builder is given, if known, followed by the location of any extant drawings and the published and manuscript sources which enable an attribution to be made.

Where extended information is given, hyperlinks to new pages are provided.


ADELAIDE, South Australia

HOLMWOOD, 20 Devonshire Street, North Walkerville

New house, for William Austin Horn, built posthumously from published designs, 1885

ATSN no.14 December 1995*, no.17 November 1996*

This Antipodean Holmwood was built from the drawings of Holmwood House in Cathcart, q.v., published in Blackie. Externally the house closely resembles Thomson's original, although it is larger, with a verandah and a wing to the left of the principal elevation containing a billiard room and there is no wall connecting with the coach house to the right; internally, the plan was modified and the details are quite different. Horn was a mining magnate and pastoralist, a Member of Parliament, a writer, sculptor and public benefactor. The estate was sold to the Crawford family in 1911, subdivided in 1955-56, and, in 1998, sold to new owners.

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AIRDRIE, Lanarkshire

ARRANVIEW

?New villa, for Gavin Black Motherwell, solicitor, 1868, with later additions

Crook*; G&W*; Alan Peden, The Monklands: An Illustrated Architectural Guide, RIAS 1992*; Sam McKinstry in ATSN no.6 January 1993*

Thomson's authorship of this Thomsonian villa in red sandstone has been disputed and there is no documentary evidence for the attribution. It may be by Robert Thomson, but David Walker wonders if it was built or completed to ‘Greek’ Thomson’s design but without his superintendence.

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ANNAN, Dumfriesshire

TOWN HALL

‡Unexecuted competition design, 1875

Gildard; Brian Edwards in ATSN no.4 June 1992*; ATSN no.5 October 1992*

Perspective drawing in Mitchell Library

According to Gildard, “the last work of this great architect - that at which he was working within two days of his death - was a design for a town-hall” and his description corresponds to the surviving drawing. In his manuscript, Gildard wrote ‘Hawick’ but then deleted it, and it is most likely that the design was for the Annan Town Hall competition, for which entries were invited by 1st April 1875.

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BAILLIESTON

GARROWHILL HOUSE

see GLASGOW: GARROWHILL HOUSE, MAXWELL DRIVE, Baillieston

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BALFRON, Stirlingshire

BALFRON SOUTH MANSE

Balfron_Manse.jpg (64877 bytes)

New house, for the Revd James Robertson, minister of Balfron old Relief congregation, c.1858

£1,000

Memorial; John Guthrie Smith, Strathendrick and its Inhabitants from early times, Glasgow 1896, p.47; Robert Small, History of the Congregations of the United Presbyterian Church from 1733 to 1900, Edinburgh 1904, vol.i, p.215; Worsdall; McFadzean*; Jim Thomson, The Balfron Heritage, Balfron 1991*

Asymmetrical villa, with timber used on the projecting gabled bay. The old Relief Congregation formed part of the United Presbyterian church in Balfron.

BALFRON CHURCHYARD

Headstone for the family of the Revd James Thomson, 1864

McFadzean

The Revd James Thomson (no relation) was minister at Holm Kirk from 1812 until 1860: see Holm of Balfron.

HOLM OF BALFRON, Stirlingshire

SMALL CHURCH & MANSE

wpeF.gif (16862 bytes)

‡Unexecuted design for combined church and manse, for Ministers, Elders and Managers of the United Presbyterian Church Holm Balfron, c.1860

Drawing showing plan and elevations in Mitchell

McFadzean*; Andrew MacMillan in S&McK*

Unique design for a rectangular church with shorter narrow aisles and a walled forecourt, combined with a contiguous manse to the same width, all marked by a strong horizontality, low pitched roofs with generous eaves. As both a church and a manse at Holm of Balfron to the east of Balfron were mentioned in the list of Thomson's works in the Deed of Trust for the Alexander Thomson Memorial and as the executed building has a very similar plan (see below), it is assumed that this remarkable unlabelled and unexecuted design was for this commission.

CHURCH & MANSE

?New combined church & manse, for Ministers, Elders and Managers of the United Presbyterian Church Holm Balfron, 1860-61

£1,400

Memorial; John Guthrie Smith, Strathendrick and its Inhabitants from early times, Glasgow 1896, p.47; Robert Small, History of the Congregations of the United Presbyterian Church from 1733 to 1900, Edinburgh 1904, vol.i, p.213

Built for an United Presbyterian congregation descended from the Holm Kirk of Balfron, an Anti-Burgher congregation formed in 1737. The new building consisted of a church with 300 sittings placed back-to-back with a manse, on the same plan as Thomson’s drawing in Mitchell (see above) but in an uncharacteristic and pedestrian style - the severely ordinary church having Gothic windows, while the conventional Victorian manse exhibits no trace of Thomson’s individuality. Possibly it was merely Thomson’s general plan that was adopted - yet both the U.P. church and the U.P. manse at Holm of Balfron were separately cited in the list of works attached to the Thomson Memorial deed of trust.

The Revd James Thomson, who commissioned Thomson shortly before his retiral, was minister at Holm Kirk for 57 years after 1812: see Balfron: Churchyard; he was succeeded by the Revd Robert Muir in 1860. The church opened in December 1861 and in 1880 the Holm Kirk Anti-Burghers joined the U.P. congregation in Balfron village. The church was converted for domestic use in 1950s, the pulpit surviving.

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BEARSDEN, Dunbartonshire

CARRICK ARDEN, 22 DRYMEN ROAD

?New villa, for John Henderson, shipowner, c.1855

Italianate Romanesque style; attribution undocumented and unlikely.

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BLAIRMORE, Argyllshire

ST ANN'S LODGE, Shore Road

?New double-villa, c.1853

Peter McNeill & David M. Walker, 'A Note on Greek Thomson', Glasgow Review, vol.ii, no.2, Summer 1965;

Attribution on stylistic grounds as similar to Seymour Lodge, q.v. Oakleigh Villa in Blairmore, by John Gordon of 1863, was inspired by Thomson's Craig Ailey at Kilcreggan, q.v.

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BLANTYRE, Lanarkshire

BARDYKES HOUSE, Bardykes Road

?New house

Walker

A large building in Thomson's villa style subsequently used as a school ; an unlikely attribution, according to McFadzean; possibly by Turnbull.

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BOTHWELL, Lanarkshire

GLEN EDEN VILLA, Laighlands Road

New house, 1855

Worsdall; McFadzean

Villa in round-arched style similar to Craig Ailey, Kilcreggan, q.v., subsequently divided into two dwellings with one half known as ‘Craigievar’.

GREEN BANK VILLA, 20 Green Street

New villa, ?for John Macdonald, ship owner, wine merchant & bonded warehousekeeper, 1855

Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W*

At the 1861 Census, the house was inhabited by John Macdonald; later additions.

HUNTLY LODGE

†New Villa

Worsdall

Demolished after a fire before 1960

Romanesque style, similar to Glen Eden, Bothwell, q.v.

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BUSBY, Lanarkshire

BUSBY HOUSE, Field Road

ATS_Busby_House_Car.jpg (179238 bytes)

†Large addition to existing house, for Durham Kippen or for Inglis & Wakefield, 1856-57

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CATHCART

BRAEHEAD VILLA

see GLASGOW: 74-76 NETHERLEE ROAD

HOLMWOOD HOUSE

see GLASGOW: 61-63 NETHERLEE ROAD

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CLYNDER

NORTH & SOUTH VILLAS

?New villas

Symmetrical pair of houses similar to Seymour Lodge, Cove, q.v.

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COVE, Dunbartonshire

ANCHORAGE (OLD MANSE), Church Road

?New house, 1850s

Gothic style, with details similar to Craigrownie Castle; attribution undocumented. The nearby Cove chapel (Church of Scotland), for which this was the manse, was designed by H.H. Mackinney of Liverpool and is also Gothic.

ASHLEA / ELLERSLIE (COVE COTTAGE), Rosneath Road

?New pair of semi-detached villas, ?for James and Robert Couper, paper manufacturers, 1850s

Worsdall

Symmetrical pair of houses in Gothic style, opposite Cove pier and originally called Cove Cottage; attribution undocumented. Trefoil decoration on timber gable bargeboards since removed. Were these the summer houses built by James and Robert Couper as copies of Braehead Villa in Cathcart, q.v.?

BARON CLIFF (BARON’S POINT VILLA), Rosneath Road

†?New villa, for John McElroy, developer & railway contractor, 1860s?

Destroyed by fire 1988

W.C. Maugham, Rosneath, Past and Present, Paisley & London 1893, p.261; Peter McNeill & David M. Walker, 'A Note on Greek Thomson', Glasgow Review, vol.ii, no.2, Summer 1965; Worsdall

In Tudor style; attribution undocumented; house placed high on cliff, approached from Shore Road below. The boundary wall and gate piers survive.

CRAG OWLET (IVY CAVE COTTAGE), Rosneath Road

New pair of semi-detached houses each containing two dwellings, for John McElroy, 1850s

Worsdall; McFadzean; Frank Arneil Walker with Fiona Sinclair, The North Clyde Estuary, RIAS Edinburgh 1992*

A sophisticated development of the “later Gothic” style of Seymour Lodge, q.v. with bay windows with concave facets as in the corner of Thomson’s Queen’s Park Terrace in Glasgow, q.v.; attribution undocumented but very likely. This terrace of four houses was owned by John McElroy and originally called Ivy Cave Cottage. Central chimney-stack now truncated.

CRAIG AILEY (ITALIAN VILLA), South Ailey Road

New villa, for John McElroy, developer, railway contractor & ironfounder, c.1852

£1,154:16:6d

Drawings (of modified design) in Blackie*

Amelia; Memorial; APSD; W.C. Maugham, Rosneath, Past and Present, Paisley & London 1893, p.261; Barclay; Law; Worsdall; McFadzean*; Frank Arneil Walker with Fiona Sinclair, The North Clyde Estuary, RIAS Edinburgh 1992*; Glendinning, MacInnes & MacKechnie, A History of Scottish Architecture, Edinburgh 1996*

Villa with belvedere in round-arched manner designed, as the architect (presumably) wrote in Blackie, as "only a summer residence," which "affords a good example of the capabilities of the Italian style, and how that style may be made to combine modern requirements, such as large and numerous windows, oriels, balconies, &c., with graceful forms and picturesque grouping." External walls of shist rubble and freestone, with the battered basement formed of vertical courses of rubble stone.

But there is confusion over the name of this house as the document compiled for the Thomson Memorial lists both Craig Ailey, Kilcreggan, and the Italian Villa under 'Villas' (the APSD only lists the Italian Villa), yet on the 1st edition 1862 Ordnance Survey map, surveyed in 1860, the Italian Villa is marked where Craig Ailey stands today while no other house is labelled 'Craig Ailey.' Further confusion is created by the fact that Craig Ailey is not in Kilcreggan - as both Villa and Cottage Architecture and the Memorial state - but in Cove. The Italian Villa (but not Craig Ailey) is mentioned in the 1871 Census as occupied by the Newman family.

John McElroy (1802-76) was a successful railway contractor and “proprietor of houses,” born in Ireland and resident at Craigrownie Cottage in 1861, who was also an ironfounder whose firm, Weir & McElroy, supplied much of the ironwork for the St Vincent Street Church. With Thomas Forgan, McElroy built Cove pier in 1852 and he took the feus on land running south on which were built Baron Cliff, Craig Ailey, Hartfield, Baron’s Hall, Glen Eden, Craigrownie House and other villas, some but not all of which were designed by Thomson. Craig Ailey was built on part of an eight acre plot also containing Craigrownie House and Craigrownie Cottage which was feued in 1852, although the account in Blackie gives the date 1850 for the house.

CRAIGROWNIE CASTLE (HOUSE), Rosneath Road

New house & boundary wall, for John McElroy, developer, ironfounder & railway contractor, c.1854

Amelia; APSD; Barclay; Worsdall; McFadzean; Frank Arneil Walker with Fiona Sinclair, The North Clyde Estuary, RIAS Edinburgh 1992*;

House in Baronial style, and may seem an unlikely attribution to Thomson although it was mentioned in the memoir written by his widow. It seems that at the beginning of his career, Thomson was prepared to use any appropriate style and the original part of Craigrownie House suggests that he could have become an accomplished exponent of the Scots Baronial manner. The building history is undocumented; originally called Craigrownie House and built in the 1850s by John McElroy on land sold by the Duke of Argyll in 1852. Internal joinery and other details similar to those in Craig Ailey and Seymour Lodge, qq.v. Bought by Alexander Abercrombie in 1858 from John McElroy; wing added in 1890s and further additions made in 1960s, now demolished. Rugged boundary wall with unusual trabeated openings almost certainly by Thomson.

FERNDEAN VILLA, Rosneath Road

?New villa, ?for Robert Blackie, publisher

Gothic design, probably by Thomson.

FERNDEAN VILLA GATES & GARDEN WALL

[†]New gate & boundary wall, for Robert Blackie, publisher, 1863

£56:19:11d

Drawing in Blackie*

Memorial; Worsdall; McFadzean; Frank Arneil Walker with Fiona Sinclair, The North Clyde Estuary, RIAS Edinburgh 1992*

The implication of the description of the gate and wall in Villa and Cottage Architecture is that the villa had also been designed by Thomson as “the decorative treatment is a free rendering of the Gothic style, but is more rustic than the character of the villa itself.” As the client was his friend Robert Blackie, this is highly likely. The gate was of “red pine timber, with ornamental studs and spikes of iron,” the wall of schist with copings of whinstone and freestone - like Thomson’s other boundary walls in Cove. The gate itself is no longer extant but the gatepier and boundary wall survive.

GLEN EDEN, Rosneath Road

New villa, for John McElroy, developer, ironfounder & railway contractor, c.1856, or earlier?

W.C. Maugham, Rosneath, Past and Present, Paisley & London 1893, p.261; Worsdall; Frank Arneil Walker with Fiona Sinclair, The North Clyde Estuary, RIAS Edinburgh 1992*

Extraordinary house with round arched windows, but with some square-headed windows on the west side elevation and pointed arches on the east side; giant triglyphs used as a decorative motif and guttae on chimneystacks. Authorship undocumented, but the unbroken low-pitched roof over the main volume, the recessed planes of the ground floor external wall on the flanks of the front elevation, the monolith mullions of the trabeated bay window and the shape of the outbuildings, together with the plan and internal joinery and plasterwork details (such as a lyre within a wreath above an ornamental ventilation strip in the tympana above the doors) similar to those in Craig Ailey nearby, q.v., suggest that an attribution to Thomson is very likely: who else could have designed it?

Gate piers of massive rubble stones and (white) quartz with neo-Classical resonances may also indicate that the design may be an exploration of the origins of architecture, possibly suggested by the name of the house. Finial flanked by serpents (?) above pediment now missing. The curious main entrance, with its primitive arch head formed by three large stones within a false round arch, may reflect Thomson’s growing concern with the instability of arcuated structures and was possibly derived from a section of a tomb near the Pyramids of Gizeh published in 1855 in James Fergusson’s Illustrated Handbook of Architecture. This house, together with the neighbouring Kirklea, q.v., and Hartfield (demolished), was built by McElroy; it was sold to John Edmond Swan, metal broker of Glasgow, who made internal alterations.

GRAFTON (LODGE), Rosneath Road

?New villa, 1860s

Attribution on stylistic grounds; some windows with round arches, and with low-pitched gables. The house is not marked on the 1862 Ordnance Survey map.

ITALIAN VILLA, see CRAIG AILEY

KIRKLEA (BARON’S HALL), Rosneath Road

?New house, for John McElroy, c.1860

W.C. Maugham, Rosneath, Past and Present, Paisley & London 1893, p.261

Highly unusual Gothic house with tall pitched roof and projecting bay windows with a central mullion; authorship undocumented, but certain details - e.g., recessed planes of ground floor masonry flanking the front elevation - appear on houses by Thomson. Originally called Baron’s Hall on Ordnance Survey map surveyed in 1860. The house and land was sold to Robert McClure, merchant, in 1860 for £1425.

KNOCKDERRY CASTLE

New house, 1855?

APSD; Barclay; Law*; Worsdall; McFadzean; Frank Arneil Walker with Fiona Sinclair, The North Clyde Estuary, RIAS Edinburgh 1992*

House in Baronial style; additions by John Honeyman 1869 (£1,600) for William Miller; additions by William Leiper 1896. This may seem an unlikely work by Thomson, and Fiona Sinclair notes that John Honeyman built a house in Cove for a Mr Campbell in 1856; at the 1861 Census the head of household was John Campbell, wholesale druggist, who had earlier bought Seymour Lodge, q.v., from the developer Thomas Forgan.

SEYMOUR LODGE, Rosneath Road

New villa, with detached coach-house, for Thomas Forgan, 1850

£966:4:8½d

Drawings of modified design published in Blackie*

Amelia; Memorial; W.C. Maugham, Rosneath, Past and Present, Paisley & London 1893, p.261; Barclay; Law; Worsdall; McFadzean*; Frank Arneil Walker with Fiona Sinclair, The North Clyde Estuary, RIAS Edinburgh 1992*

A villa in what Thomson described as "an adaptation of the later Gothic," sold in 1852 to John Campbell junior, wholesale druggist, who sold the house in 1855 Elizabeth Campbell of Glasgow, who was there at the 1861 Census (when John Campbell was at Knockderry Castle, Cove, q.v.). Walls of shist rubble with the principal elevation of dressed freestone; additions were made before 1868 and the exterior stonework was subsequently painted. This villa generated many imitations nearby, e.g., Dunvronaig and Dunvorleigh in Kilcreggan, q.v., on the Shore Road (later Rosneath Road), a carriage drive laid out in 1848 by the Duke of Argyll (whose seat was Rosneath Castle).

Kilcreggan Pier was built in 1850 and Cove Pier in 1852, allowing steam boat services to encourage the development of villas on land feued from the Duke of Argyll. Cove Pier was built by John McElroy and Thomas Forgan, and the latter developed the land north of the pier, building Cove Cottages, Rocklea, Seymour Lodge and Ferndean.

How many of the similar houses in Cove and Kilcreggan Thomson actually designed himself is not documented; many look like Seymour Lodge, but whether these were inspired directly or resulted from its design (along with that of Craig Ailey, q.v.) being published in Blackie's Villa and Cottage Architecture in 1868 cannot be established. Some are possibly by Thomson's sometime partner, John Baird, whose cottage of 1863 at Roseneath was also included in the Blackie book; others are by William Motherwell.

SHORE ROAD BRIDGE, Rosneath Road

New bridge over Dowall Burn, for the Cove Bridge Committee, c. 1873

McFadzean*

Arched opening in massive retaining wall of rubble stone forming curved abutments at either end. £12 was still owing to Thomson at his death, indicating that the job was begun before the partnership with Turnbull. The chairman of the committee was Thomson's client and friend, the publisher Robert Blackie (who resided at Ferndean Villa as well as at no.7 Great Western Terrace in Glasgow, qq.v). Shore Road was later renamed Rosneath Road.

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CRAIGMORE, ROTHESAY, ISLE OF BUTE

TOR HOUSE (UPPER CLIFTON HOUSE), Ardencraig Road

Torhouse.jpg (37616 bytes)

New villa, for John Wilson, bookseller & stationer, 1856-57

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DALMUIR, Dunbartonshire

MELBOURNE HOUSE, Regent Street

?New villa, for A.J. Campbell, general manager of Beardmore's shipyard, c.1877-80

Worsdall

Attribution unlikely; probably by Turnbull according to Worsdall, who also cited several other Thomsonesque buildings in Dalmuir by Turnbull, 1877: 19 The Crescent / 45-47 Duntocher Road (left incomplete in 1878) and a group of three houses: Holmfield, Westfield & Glenlee (or Ravenswood, The Tower & Uladah Towers)???? in Duntocher Road, all destroyed during the Second World War.

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DULLATUR, Dunbartonshire

CRAIGARD, Victoria Road

?New villa, 1875-76

DUNLUCE, Prospect Road

?New villa, 1875-76

Attribution by McFadzean, but possibly by Turnbull

HILLCROFT?

?New villa, 1875-76

?Demolished

RICHMOND HOUSE, Prospect Road

?New villa, 1875-76

?Demolished

Attribution by McFadzean, but possibly by Turnbull

STANLEY HOUSE, ?Prospect Road

†?New villa1875-76

Demolished

WOODEND, Prospect Road

?New villa, 1875-76

Feuing plan in Glasgow City Archives

Francis H. Groome, ed., Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland, new edition

Attribution by McFadzean, but possibly by Turnbull although the designs are more taut and coherent than his Lenzie villas, q.v.; the Ordnance Gazetteer noted that "Dullatur Villas here, on a plot of 164 acres, around the old mansions of Dykehead and Dullatur, were erected in 1875-76." The feuing plan of the lands of Dullatur invited application to Duncan Lennox, J.L. & T.L. Selkirk and A. & G. Thomson & Turnbull, and indicated some fifty new houses.

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DUNOON

ARGYLL HOTEL, Argyll Street

?New building, c.1850

Frank Arneil Walker with Fiona Sinclair, The North Clyde Estuary, RIAS Edinburgh 1992*

Unlikely undocumented attribution to Thomson on stylistic grounds; two-storey wing added 1876. Worsdall also cited Lyall Cliff, Esplanade, Dunoon.

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DUNTOCHER, Dunbartonshire

PARKHALL U.P. MANSE

Duntocher1.jpg (41908 bytes)

†New house, for the Revd John Stark, 1874-75

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EASTWOOD

OLD CEMETERY, WODROW MONUMENT:

see GLASGOW, EASTWOOD OLD CEMETERY

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EDINBURGH

ST MARY'S FREE CHURCH, BROUGHTON STREET

St_Georges_Edinburgh.jpg (88682 bytes)

‡Unexecuted competition design, c.1858

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GLASGOW

THE KNOWE, 301 ALBERT DRIVE / SHIELDS ROAD, Pollokshields

New villa, for John Blair, hat & cap manufacturer, c.1852, 1854 &c.

Amelia; Memorial; Francis Worsdall, typescript notes in Glasgow City Archives in Mitchell; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W; BofS*; List; Ronald Smith, Pollokshields: Historical Guide and Heritage Walk, Glasgow 1998*

Villa in Italianate Romanesque style designed by Baird & Thomson 1850 and built ?1852-53 on land feued from Nether Pollok estate 1851; the client also commissioned a warehouse in the city centre [see Dixon Street / Howard Street]. House enlarged to north c.1855-58 with new study and drawing room; Shields Farm to the east demolished 1870 and Shields Road extended south over its site, allowing the enlargement of the gardens: new boundary walls with new entrance in Aytoun Road (formerly Lower Shields Road) c.1873, &c.

The Knowe was originally no.1 Albert Drive; name changed to 'Nile Park' when bought by William Hood, butcher, in 1892; original name restored by next owner in 1909. Large new billiard room added to south-east by John Campbell McKellar 1899; boiler room added 1895 and workshops 1902 by John Ballantyne. Interior plasterwork survives; most of chimneypieces replaced in 1890s, but original white marble chimneypiece with incised laurel (?) ornament and integrated overmantel survives in drawing room. Grounds built over with blocks of flats by Messrs Bovis - Knowehead Gardens & Knowehead Terrace - 1974.

THE KNOWE LODGE, ALBERT DRIVE, Pollokshields

New coachman's house & gates, for John Blair, 1852, c.1873 &c.

McFadzean*

Coach house part of original build and later partly demolished and altered for new entrance.

336-338 ALBERT DRIVE

?New house, 1877

Worsdall; McFadzean*; List

Probably designed by Thomson and executed by Robert Turnbull after his death; now divided into two dwellings.

BEAUFORT GARDENS, 19-23 GARTURK STREET / 265-289 ALLISON STREET / 34 DAISY STREET

New block of tenements with shops below, 1875-78

Worsdall; McFadzean; G&W; BofS; List

Scheme begun by Thomson and then executed to simpler design by Turnbull c.1878

7-20 ATHOLE GARDENS

?New terrace of houses

Walker

BUCK'S HEAD BUILDINGS, 59-61 ARGYLE STREET / 1 DUNLOP STREET

New commercial premises with shops below, for Henry Leck, accountant, 1863-c.1868

Amelia; Memorial; Gildard; Glasgow and its Environs: A Literary, Commercial and Social Review, Past & Present..., London 1891*; Henry-Russell Hitchcock, 'Early Cast-Iron Facades', Architectural Review cix, February 1951*; Law*; Worsdall; McFadzean*; Architects' Journal 6th May 1854*; G&W*; BofS; Brian Edwards in S&McK*; List

Curved corner building with external elevated iron columns proud of trabeated masonry facade - a combination not repeated in Thomson’s work. The building history of this block and its southern extension along Dunlop Street has been problematic, but owing to the researches of Raymond Nicol, the chronology can now be established. This eponymous commercial building replaced the Buck's Head Hotel, an 18th century mansion facing Argyle Street, which was demolished in 1863 together with its rear extensions. At this point Dunlop Street was widened.

The external iron colonettes on the curved facade may possibly have been added after a dispute with John Carrick, City Architect, about the structural stability of the building: a partly illegible copy [in the Archives] of a letter Carrick sent to Thomson on 4th December 1863 reads that

“I am really ashamed at the delay at the Bucks Head Building. There is a threatened [?] rebellion [?] in the neighbourhood & rumour of a Petition to the Town Council... The financial audit of the speculation [?] is suffering, and I am annoyed with calls, as to the stability of the structure. Let me know from you [?] as the Fiscal is threatening to raise an action...”

Internally, Thomson used McConnel composite iron beams, a combination of wrought iron and cast iron sections which had been patented in 1855. Parapet sculpture by J. & G. Mossman. The basic articulation of the facade but with a two-storey pilastrade and without the external ironwork was later continued in the extension along Dunlop Street, which was once erroneously thought to precede the Buck's Head Building in date. In 1870 the ground floor of both buildings was occupied by the Glasgow Clothing Co., which expanded to all five floors after the Buck's Head Building “was considerably enlarged and improved in 1878-79.” Henry Leck, who bought the site in 1858 and sold it in 1869, was an accountant and developer for whom Thomson gave evidence in his disputed claim against the Caledonian Railway in 1874 over property he owned on the site of Central Station [see Gordon Street / Alston Street].

3-11 DUNLOP STREET

[†]New warehouse with shops below, for Henry Leck, 1864-c.1868

Demolished 1974 except for northernmost three bays

Glasghu Facies... The History of Glasgow vol.iv, John Tweed, Glasgow 1872; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W*; David Walker &c. in S&McK*

This building is not the extension to the Buck's Head Hotel with “ornamental Chimney-Stalks” and flues in the pilasters which was the subject of controversy for the Dean of Guild in 1849. Raymond Nicol has demonstrated that this had nothing to do with Thomson and that the site was cleared, along with that of the Buck's Head Hotel, in 1863-64. New buildings to the north and south of the new Wilson's Court Lane off Dunlop Street were under construction in 1864 (but not occupied until 1871), the northern block being designed by Thomson in a manner harmonious with the new Buck's Head Buildings with tall pilasters but without the external ironwork. The junction between the two buildings was marked externally by a slight projection - presumably to accommodate the width of iron columns on the Argyle Street block - and internally only by a thin brick partition. The McConnel beams used in the Dunlop Street block appear to have been of a later pattern, possibly resulting from the alterations made in 1878-79 (see above). The demolished bays of the Dunlop Street frontage were replaced by a feeble and inadequate replica at the time of the redevelopment of the site of St Enoch Station.

135-137 ARGYLE STREET

†additions, for Alexander McAllister, 1862

Drawings in Glasgow City Archives

Small extension of existing warehouse off St Enoch Wynd.

CROSSMYLOOF BUILDINGS, 11?-21 BAKER STREET, Langside

†Two terraces of model working men's houses, for Mr Thomson of Camphill1855-56

Demolished c.1964

Building Chronicle 1st July 1856 p.79; Worsdall; Walker; Brian Edwards in S&McK

Two rows of "model working-men's houses", one of 20 and one of 24 dwellings on two floors with separate entrances for each pair of flats. The rent for each flat was £6 a year. “The buildings are in the cottage style, the windows, of zinc lattice work, are hinged instead of being hung in the usual way, the roof is steeply pitched, and the eaves project eighteen inches beyond the walls, being supported on cantilevers... Each range of houses is terminated by gable ends, projecting eighteen inches beyond the general line of the building, and giving the inmates the privilege not only of a more commodious house, but an entrance by a very handsome porch.” The description corresponds with two terraces which lay parallel to and between Pollokshaws Road and Stevenson Drive to the south-east of Langside Avenue as shown on the 1:500 Ordnance Survey map published 1895; Baker Street was subsequently laid out along their north-east front. The northernmost terrace had disappeared by 1964.

CHALMERS MEMORIAL FREE CHURCH, 42-50 BALLATER (GOVAN) STREET

Ballater St 1.jpg (81046 bytes)

†New church, for Free Church congregation1859, enlarged 1873; hall added 1871

Partly demolished c.1896; gutted by fire 1971 and demolished

Amelia; Memorial; William Ewing, Annals of the Free Church of Scotland, Edinburgh 1914, vol.ii, p.92; Law*; Worsdall; McFadzean; G&W; Andrew Herron, Historical Directory to Glasgow Presbytery, Glasgow 1984 (typescript in Mitchell); ATSN no.7 June 1993*; S&McK*; Eric Eunson, The Gorbals: An Illustrated History, Ochiltree 1996*;

Thomson’s fourth, little-known Glasgow church, with a rectangular centralised interior and a facade treatment sometimes compared to that of the later Unity Temple, Oak Park, by Frank Lloyd Wright. Built for Union Free Church congregation; sold 1869 to Mission Station under Trinity Free Church and renamed after Mr Cuninghame of Merry & Cuninghame who provided £1,000 purchase price; also sometimes known as the Govan Street Free Church. The original building had a symmetrical facade and a rectangular interior with seats for 850, but the eastern entrance and side gallery was removed when the adjacent City of Glasgow Union Railway viaduct was widened from two tracks to four in 1896-97. The church hall to the west, on a slightly different building line, was added in 1871, probably by Thomson, when Govan Street (now Ballater Street) was extended westwards. Building sold to Glasgow & South Western Railway in 1898 and by the beginning of the 20th century it was used by ‘bottle closure manufacturers’, i.e., as a cork works.

CAIRNEY BUILDING, 40-42 BATH STREET

cairney_bldg2.jpg (114476 bytes)

†New commercial premises with shops below, for John Cairney, glass-stainer, 1860-61

Demolished c.1935

Original elevation drawing in Mitchell; elevation published in Building News 1872 and measured drawing by Frank R. Burnet in The Architects' & Builders' Journal 1914.

Building News 31st May 1872 p.436 (elevation)* & 24th January 1873 p.109 (details)*; Amelia; Memorial; Gildard; APSD; Builder 31st December 1910*; The Architects' & Builders' Journal 13th May 1914*; Henry-Russell Hitchcock, 'Early Cast-Iron Facades', Architectural Review cix, February 1951*; Law; Worsdall; McFadzean*; Michael Donnelly, Glasgow Stained Glass, a preliminary study, Glasgow 1981; G&W*; AA*; McKean*; S&McK*;

One of Thomson's most innovative and extraordinary commercial buildings; the Building News noted that it was “planned for (generally) shops and counting-houses, and a workshop and warehouse for the proprietor's own use... The style is that peculiar variety of Greek which the Messrs Thomson may be said to have created.” Cairney's kilns and furnaces were in the lower of the two storeys below street level. John Cairney was a partner in his father’s firm, William Cairney & Sons, by 1850 and resigned from the Glasgow Architectural Society owing to ill-health in 1860; the building was owned by Rowley & Dick, oil-merchants, by 1872. In 1949, Henry-Russell Hitchcock wrote to Nikolaus Pevsner about this “warehouse in Bath Street which seems to me one of the finest of all Victorian warehouses.”

SCOTTISH EXHIBITION, 87-97 BATH STREET

†New exhibition hall, for the Architectural Institute of Scotland, 1854, altered 1872

Demolished 1875

Builder 13th January 1855, p.22, & 14th April 1855, p.172; Building Chronicle, passim., 1854-55; Building News 7th June 1872, p.456; George; Worsdall; McFadzean; Charles McKean in S&McK*

Premises for Glasgow Architectural Exhibition, intended to be permanent, which including rooms in different styles designed by several architects - Greek court by Baird & Thomson. Exhibition closed 1857 and premises used as showrooms & offices, then converted into coach house & stables by Thomson in 1872 for John E. Walker at cost of £450 [see Otago Street] before being replaced by a new office building by Thomson.

NOS.87-97 BATH STREET

†New office building, 1874-76

Demolished 1970

Building News 31st December 1875 p.764; Amelia; Walker; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W; S&McK* 

A commercial building with a flat stone facade not articulated by columns or pilasters, but enlivened by three elaborate porches. It replaced the former Exhibition premises (see above) and was “in course of erection” in December 1875.

COCKBURN HOTEL (BUILDING), 135-143 BATH STREET / 138 WEST CAMPBELL STREET

†?Alterations & additions, 1875? or c.1879-81

Demolished 1970-71

McFadzean; Frank Worsdall, The City That Disappeared, Glasgow 1981*;

Additional upper floors &c., to building incorporating earlier houses probably executed by David Thomson & Robert Turnbull: McFadzean comments that the quality of the work makes an attribution to Thomson plausible. Originally an hotel?

ALEXANDRA HOTEL, 144 WEST CAMPBELL STREET / 148 BATH STREET

Alexhotel2.jpg (112546 bytes)

†Additions and alterations to existing building to make new hotel, for John Macrae, 1875-77

BELL STREET, see WATSON STREET

7-&7A BRUCE ROAD, LEVEN VIEW, Pollokshields

?New villa

Worsdall; List

Attribution on stylistic grounds

13 - or 18? BRUCE ROAD

?New villa

GARNKIRK WAREHOUSE, 243 BUCHANAN STREET / SAUCHIEHALL STREET

†New shop front (and interior?), for the Garnkirk Fireclay Co. (originally Garnkirk Coal Co.), 1857

Destroyed

Gildard; Glasgow and its Environs: A Literary, Commercial and Social Review, Past & Present..., London 1891; Worsdall; G. Quail, Garnkirk Fireclay, Strathkelvin District Libraries & Museum, 1985; The Word and the Stones, Glasgow 1990

The 1891 guide mentions “the extremely commodious offices and showrooms of the company at the corner of Buchanan Street and Sauchiehall Street...” while Gildard wrote of “the depending scroll on each side of the pilasters... in wood in a shop front in Buchanan Street...” and of “the magnificent [vase] in fireclay... of which you may see copies in the windows of the Garnkirk Warehouse in Buchanan Street.” The special chimney pots designed by Thomson for many of his buildings were made at the Garnkirk Works near Glasgow. John Cannan, salesman for the Garnkirk Fireclay Co., contributed to the Thomson Memorial Fund in 1876.

Also see OBJECTS for the Garnkirk Urn.

LILYBANK HOUSE, 40 BUTE GARDENS

Additions & alteration to existing house, for John Blackie, junior, publisher and Lord Provost, 1864

Walker; Worsdall; Henry Brougham Morton, A Hillhead Album, Glasgow 1973*; McFadzean*; BofS; List

The symmetrical Classical villa of c.1850 was extended to the south by Thomson with an asymmetrical wing with a new Ionic entrance portico; a further wing to the north was added by Honeyman & Keppie in 1895, by when the house was known as Queen Margaret Hall. John Blackie junior (d.1873) was Lord Provost of Glasgow in 1863-66 and was much involved with the City Improvement Scheme.

CALEDONIA ROAD U.P. CHURCH, 1 CALEDONIA ROAD, Hutchesontown

[†] New church & hall, for United Presbyterian congregation meeting in Wellington Place Academy, Commercial Road, 1856-57

37-39 CATHCART ROAD

†New block of tenements with shops below, for Robert McDougall, 1856-57

Demolished 1973

Drawing (also showing Caledonia Road Church) in Mitchell

Worsdall; McFadzean*; AA*; Robert Jeffrey & Ian Watson, eds, Images of Glasgow, Derby 1995, p.50*

The facade of this tenement was contiguous with the outside wall of the hall of the Caledonia Road Church.

190-192 HOSPITAL STREET, Hutchesontown

†New block of tenements with shops below, for James Roberton, metal-founder, 1856-57

Demolished 1972

Drawing (also showing Caledonia Road Church) in Mitchell

Worsdall; McFadzean*; S&McK*; ATSN no.15 January 1996

The facade of this tenement was contiguous with the external wall of the Caledonia Road Church.

WAVERLEY TERRACE, 105-157 CALEDONIA ROAD / 76 NABURN STREET

†New tenement, 1868-76

Demolished

Walker

Similar to Queen’s Park Terrace, Eglinton Street, q.v.

LANGSIDE ACADEMY, LANGSIDE AVENUE / CAMPHILL AVENUE

†New school building, for Mrs Adam, proprietor & principal, 1864-

Builder: John McIntyre

Demolished c.1902

Building News 10th June 1864, p.453; Amelia; Glasgow and its Environs: A Literary, Commercial and Social Review, Past & Present..., London 1891*; Walker; Worsdall; McFadzean; John McLeish in ATSN no.11 October 1994*

Jane Constable, the widow of George Adam, founder of the Langside Academy, commissioned Thomson to design a new school building in his characteristic manner with low-pitched roofs. She would seem to be the Mrs Adam who asked Thomson to design a “double villa” next door in 1872, q.v. The site is now occupied by a block of tenements, dated 1903.

DOUBLE VILLA, CAMPHILL AVENUE, Langside

‡Unexecuted design for new houses, for Mrs Adam & J.H. Robertson, 1872

George; McFadzean; John McLeish in ATSN no.11 October 1994 & no.12 January 1995

In a his letter to his brother George, 20th September 1872, Thomson recorded that “a set of plans which I made of a double villa for Mrs Adam and her son in law Mr. J.H. Robertson are in the same position...” of remaining on paper because of the high estimated cost. As Mrs Adam was the proprietor of Langside Academy - see above - who built Edgehill House next door - see below - for herself and James H. Robertson, lawyer, in 1873, Thomson's unexecuted and lost design was presumably for the same site.

EDGHILL HOUSE, 19-21 CAMPHILL AVENUE

?New pair of semi-detached houses, for Mrs Adam & J.H. Robertson, 1873

John McLeish in ATSN no.11 October 1994*

Following the rejection of Thomson’s design for a double villa on this site, the clients built a large and plain pair of semi-detached houses in the Gothic style with steeply pitched roofs and gables, but as certain details are reminiscent of Thomson’s earlier Gothic houses, e.g., at Cove, q.v., the design may well have been by him, or by Turnbull; internal Thomsonesque details confirm this.

COUPER MONUMENT, CATHCART OLD PARISH CEMETERY, Carmunnock Road

†?New grave monument, for James Couper, paper manufacturer, 1870

Made by J. & G. Mossman

Removed c.1933

Mossman

Monument erected 1870 and altered in 1871, with further letters cut in 1877; James Couper (1818-77) was Thomson's client at Holmwood House, q.v. and his first wife, Marion Harvey, died in 1869. It is not clear whether Thomson designed this, and whatever was raised was replaced following the death in 1933 of Couper's niece and heir, Marion Towle, who adopted the name Couper, so that she, along with James Couper and his two wives, now lie in front of a large and austere headstone made by J. & G. Mossman.

McINTYRE MONUMENT, CATHCART OLD PARISH CEMETERY

New tomb monument, for John McIntyre, 1867

Worsdall; McFadzean*; BofS; ATSN no.11 October 1994

Large monument with a base of cyclopaean masonry placed against wall in cemetery. Commissioned by Thomson's friend John McIntyre “Builder in Glasgow” for his son, Donald McLaren (1858-66); John McIntyre himself buried there in 1872.

37-39 CATHCART ROAD, Hutchesontown, see CALEDONIA ROAD CHURCH

JAMES LUMSDEN STATUE, CATHEDRAL SQUARE

?Plinth, 1862

Made by J. & G. Mossman

Worsdall

Granite plinth for bronze statue by John Mossman.

MOSSMAN STUDIO, CATHEDRAL STREET, see 83 NORTH FREDERICK STREET

31-57 CECIL STREET, Hillhead

?New tenement, 1873

Walker

No documentary evidence

1-5 CESSNOCK STREET

?New block of tenements

Worsdall

MONTGOMERIE QUADRANT, 17-25 CLEVEDEN ROAD, Kelvinside

?New terrace of houses, 1882-86

BofS

Unlikely attribution: a posthumous work, or by A.G. Thomson, or by James Sellars, who lived here? A copy photograph of ‘Montgomerie Crescent’ survives among the photographs and other material belonging to Thomson presented to Glasgow Museums & Art Galleries by his grand-daughter Mrs Stewart in 1934.

CUSTOMS HOUSE, CLYDE STREET

Alterations, 1873 or earlier

McFadzean

The Custom House of 1840 by John Taylor was one of the seven Greek Revival buildings in Glasgow cited by Thomson in his Haldane Lectures for employing the models found on the Acropolis of Athens and praised as “very good.” At the time of his death, Thomson was owed £3:3:0d in outstanding fees for this job, indicating that it dated from before the partnership with Turnbull.

COWCADDENS CROSS BUILDING, 110-120 COWCADDENS STREET

†New block of tenements with warehouse space and shops below, for J.& J. Jardine, masons & builders, 1872-

Demolished 1971

George; Building News 7th June 1872, p.455; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W; ATSN no.12 January 1995;

Block of “warehouses and dwellings in Cowcaddens” with curved masonry facade and cast iron frame behind; shops divided by thin timber partitions to permit flexibility.

CLEGHORN-THOMSON MONUMENT, CRAIGTON CEMETERY

New tomb monument, for descendants of Robert Cleghorn and Margaret Thomson, c.1873-75

Made & carved by J. & G. Mossman

ATSN no.(21) May 1998*

Attribution by McFadzean. Monument similar in shape to the Beattie Monument in the Necropolis, q.v., but with the name ‘Thomson’ under the urn and a wreath carved on the plinth containing a hand holding flowers and the legend ‘Industrie Munis.’ The inscription records the names of Robert Cleghorn, MD, of Shawfield, died 1821; his wife Margaret Thomson, died 1795; their daughter Helen, died 1853; George Thomson, merchant, died 1852; his wife Margaret Graham, died 1854; John Thomson of London, died 1858, and others bearing the name of Thomson all formerly buried in the College (or Blackfriars) Churchyard. The first burials in the new Govan Burgh (Craigton) Cemetery were in June 1873 and the College Churchyard next to the University in the High Street was removed in 1875. The Mossman Order Book for 1877 recorded an urn on a short pillar for George G. Thomson of Cleghorn Villa, Pollokshields.

SPROTT MONUMENT, CRAIGTON CEMETERY

?New tomb obelisk, for the congregation of the Queen's Park United Presbyterian Church, 1876

Made & carved by J. & G. Mossman

£251

Mossman; ATSN no.(21) May 1998*

Sprott, Minister of the Queen's Park Church, q.v., died on 13th March, 1875, after being fatally injured in a railway accident at Bedford. As Thomson himself died shortly afterwards, this obelisk monument of granite designed by A. & G. Thomson & Turnbull must have been the work of Turnbull, based on the Middleton Monument in the Necropolis and Thomson's obelisk design, qq.v. Bronze portrait medallion of Sprott stolen.

CROSSMYLOOF BUILDINGS, see BAKER STREET

357-369 CROWN STREET / 53-57 CALEDONIA ROAD

†?new block of tenements, with shops below

Demolished

Walker; Worsdall

No documentary evidence; similar to the 590-612 EGLINTON STREET tenement, q.v.

278-282 CUMBERLAND STREET / 87-89 CAMDEN STREET

?New tenement, c.1870

Walker

No documentary evidence, but likely

DARNLEY TERRACE, see 98-130 KILMARNOCK ROAD

7 DIRLETON AVENUE (MAITLAND PLACE), Shawlands

?New villa

Demolished c.1970

Attribution on stylistic grounds by McFadzean; for other villas nearby see TANTALLON ROAD

17-19 DIXON STREET, see HOWARD STREET, ST ENOCH SQUARE

DOUBLE VILLA, see MANSIONHOUSE ROAD

3-11 DUNLOP STREET, see BUCK'S HEAD BUILDING, ARGYLE STREET

WODROW MONUMENT, EASTWOOD OLD CEMETERY, Thornliebank Road

New grave monument, for subscribers, 1850s

Made by J. & G. Mossman

Worsdall

Urn now missing from top. The inscription reads: “Erected to the memory of the Rev. Robert Wodrow Minister of Eastwood the faithful historian of the sufferings of the Church of Scotland from the year 1660 to 1688. He died 21st March 1734 in the 55th year of his age and 31st of his ministry ‘He being dead yet speaketh'.” The 1859 edition of Robert Chambers' Biographical Dictionary of Eminent Scotsmen states that Wodrow's “memory has lately been commemorated by the erection of a monument” which was raised by public subscription. Wodrow was buried in the churchyard, but probably in an unmarked grave further to the west.

307 EGLINTON STREET / 60 CAVENDISH STREET

†New block of tenements, with shops below, 1858

Demolished 1969

G&W; McFadzean*; Eric Eunson, The Gorbals: An Illustrated History, Ochiltree 1996*

QUEEN'S PARK TERRACE, 39-41 DEVON STREET / 355-429 EGLINTON STREET / 1 TURRIFF STREET

†New terrace of tenements with shops below, for John McIntyre, William Stevenson & De Hort Baird, c.1856-60

Builder: John McIntyre

Demolished 1980-81

Building Chronicle July 1857 p.224; Amelia; Memorial; Law*; Hitchcock*; Worsdall; McFadzean*; S. Dool, D. McKellar & A. Meldrum, Macdiss 197? (lost?); Gerard Creanor, 'The Terraces of Greek Thomson', Macdiss 1975*; Frank Worsdall, The Tenement: A Way of Life, Edinburgh 1979* (2nd ed. 1989*); Iain B. Miller, 'Three Thomson Tenements' Macdiss. 1980*; Frank Worsdall, The City That Disappeared, Glasgow 1981*; G&W*; The Word and the Stones, Glasgow 1990; S&McK*; ATSN no.10 May 1994 & no.11 October 1994; Eric Eunson, The Gorbals: An Illustrated History, Ochiltree 1996*; Glendinning, MacInnes & MacKechnie, A History of Scottish Architecture, Edinburgh 1996*

Thomson's largest, finest and most influential block of tenements, built in two stages between Devon Street and Elgin, now Turriff Street, and originally numbered 233-279. “Is it perhaps superfluous to state that the Greeks did not build tenements?” Francis Worsdall wondered in 1966. “The derogatory remarks which are sometimes aimed at Thomson's highly original and monumental block of tenements in Eglinton Street makes one wonder. The rhythmic quality which he invariably gives to his windows is particularly suitable to tenement design and this Eglinton Street example is a marvel of its kind. At the north end is a four-storey corner bay which begins as convex but changes to concave for the upper three stories - a unique feature.” This treatment of the northern corner, to Devon Street, as a separate element with vertical concave facets like a fluted column, was particularly remarkable and possibly inspired by the Temple of Venus at Baalbek. Attempts at rehabilitation of this important building after years of neglect ended with demolition by Glasgow District Council, despite its being statutorily listed category 'A' - “even the elegant black marble fireplaces were being smashed with a sledge hammer and the ceiling decorations tossed onto the rubbish heap.” The site remains empty.

TURRIFF STREET / 433-491 EGLINTON STREET / GOUROCK STREET

†New terrace of tenements, for John Findlay, mason; James Robertson, insurance agent; James Brodie, mill manager; James McIntyre, William Stevenson & De Hort Baird, c.1857-59

Largely demolished c.1876 and c.1970?

Walker, Worsdall; G&W; Michael Moss & John Hume, Glasgow As It Was vol.ii, Glasgow 1975*; Iain B. Miller, 'Three Thomson Tenements' Macdiss. 1980*; ATSN no.10 May 1994* & no.11 October 1994

Long range of tenements in Eglinton Street, built in four stages (for four different clients) and originally numbered 281-323, south of Turriff Street very similar in design to the Queen's Park Terrace immediately to the north; mostly demolished for the extension of the Caledonian Railway into Central Station 1873-79. However, the southern end of the terrace - 487-491 Eglinton Street - stood until the 1970s while windows and other pieces of the original stonework seems to have been re-used in the surviving two-storey section - 463-473 Eglinton Street - built above the railway.

GLASGOW: 590-612 EGLINTON STREET / 20-26 GOUROCK STREET

?New tenement, c.1860

Walker; Worsdall, List

GARROWHILL HOUSE, see MAXWELL DRIVE, Baillieston

SIR ROBERT PEEL STATUE, GEORGE SQUARE

Plinth, 1859

Made by J. & G. Mossman

Alexander Stoddart in S&McK*

Granite plinth for bronze statue by John Mossman. Another unidentified design for a plinth for a similar statue is in the Mitchell.

2-10? GIBSON (KING) STREET

†New tenement with shops below, for Andrew Clow, 1873

Demolished c.198?

Drawings in Glasgow City Archives in Mitchell

Walker; McFadzean

The drawings bear the names of both Thomson and his assistant, Robert Goodwin, at 122 Wellington Street; Goodwin later set up in independent practice and subscribed to the Thomson Memorial. The site in King, now Gibson Street was next to the River Kelvin and was bought off John E. Walker, for whom Thomson designed the stables nearby in Otago (Smith) Street, q.v.; demolished owing to structural instability. McFadzean erroneously gives the address as 174-206 Gibson Street.

32-68 GORBALS STREET, GORBALS CROSS, see 12-24 NORFOLK STREET

106-132 GORBALS STREET / 25-42 DUNMORE STREET

?New tenement, c.1875

Walker

No documentary evidence

(GROSVENOR BUILDING), 68-80 GORDON STREET

New block of commercial premises with shops below, for Alexander & George Thomson, 1858-59; gutted by fire 1864 and rebuilt 1864-66; altered 1907 &c.

£14,900 for the building

Glasgow Herald 23rd May 1864; North British Daily Mail 23rd May 1864; George; Amelia; Memorial; Gildard; APSD; Law*; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W*; BofS; S&McK*; ATSN no.4 June 1992 & no.5 October 1992, no.11 October 1994, no.13 May 1995*, no18 February 1997*; Glendinning, MacInnes & MacKechnie, A History of Scottish Architecture, Edinburgh 1996*; List

Commercial building with a most elaborately articulated facade built on the site of the Gordon Street U.P. Church after purchase by A. & G. Thomson, who were asked by the congregation to design the new church on the site bought with the proceeds in St Vincent Street, q.v.; the cost was £15,000 which was commuted to a Ground Annual payment of £700 (Glasgow Sasines at the Scottish Record Office). The building work was undertaken for the Thomsons by McCraw & Kay and Robert McConnel, ironfounder. The office of A. & G. Thomson was here by 1861 before moving to 183 West George Street, q.v. The building was gutted by fire on 21st May 1864: “So powerful was the heat of the flames that it was impossible to stand on the opposite side of the street, while the corners of the stone-work of the building have been rounded as if by a week’s labour of a regiment of masons... The long slender stone frontage, with its delicate architectural ornamentation, alone remains” - as is confirmed by photographs then taken by Thomas Annan.

After the fire, the Glasgow Herald reported that,

"With a street frontage of nearly 100 feet, it extended backwards to Renfield Lane, forming an immense square block, four storeys in height, besides attics and sunk flat... towards the lane was a frontage, consisting of tall stone pilasters running up the entire height of the building, and alternating with wide spaces filled in with wood and glass. In the interior of the building, iron was freely used in the shape of pillars and girders, and in the upper storeys a large quantity of timber was employed.”

Shops were on the ground floor; on the upper floors staircases and counting houses were at either end with warehouses and showrooms in between:

“The lighting of these was provided for by a large 'well' with sloping sides of wood and glass which descended through the centre of the block, down to the level of the first floor. The roof was constructed of wood and glass, the former then covered with asphalte... Taking into consideration the peculiar construction of the building and the inflammable character of a large proportion of its contents, one might have anticipated beforehand that a fire obtaining anything like a hold in it would be attended with disastrous consequences... Thomsons’ building continued to belch forth flame like the centre of a miniature volcano.”

The building had been insured for £15-16,000. Dean of Guild Court Proceedings for 21st July 1864 noted that A. & G. Thomson were “to re-erect or alter a tenement recently destroyed by fire in Gordon Street” requiring the closure of a quarter of a street for seven months, and the block was rebuilt by 1866. Although the rents provided a source of income, this building was a constant source of anxiety for the Thomson brothers as their surviving correspondence of 1871-74 reveals. The building burned again in 1901 and in 1907 a large superstructure containing the Grosvenor Restaurant designed by J.H. Craigie of Clarke, Bell & Craigie was added, giving the present name to the building. Interior altered 1958 and again damaged by fire 1967; facade only retained (and mutilated) in new development 1992.

For photographs, go here.

GORDON STREET / ALSTON STREET

‡Unexecuted design for warehouse and shops, for Henry Leck, c.1873-74

ATSN no.14 December 1995

A. & G. Thomson & Turnbull made drawings for “proposed warehouses & shops, east corner of Alston and Gordon Streets” for Henry Leck, who had acquired property on the south side of Gordon Street in 1872-73. This was shrewd, as the land was needed for the proposed new terminus of the Caledonian Railway which obtained its Act in 1873. The following year, Thomson gave evidence on property values on behalf of Leck in his claim for compensation against the railway company. Alston Street and Leck’s properties disappeared when Glasgow Central Station was built in 1875-78. Thomson’s drawings do not survive; Leck’s papers are at Glasgow City Archives. 

GOVAN STREET FREE CHURCH, see BALLATER STREET

485-503 GOVAN ROAD / 2-6 CARMICHAEL STREET

†?New block of tenements, c.1872

Demolished

Walker; G&W

GRANTLY TERRACE, see 196-200 KILMARNOCK ROAD

1-11 GREAT WESTERN TERRACE, GREAT WESTERN ROAD

New terrace of eleven houses, for William Henderson, builder, and/or James Whitelaw Anderson, landowner, 1867-77

George; Amelia; Memorial; Gildard; Barclay*; Builder 31st December 1910*; The Architects' & Builders' Journal 13th May 1914*; A.E. Richardson, 'Architecture: The Classic Tradition,' in G.M. Young, ed., Early Victorian England 1830-1865, London 1934, vol.ii, p.206; Stewart; J.M. Reid, Glasgow, London 1956*; Architects' Journal 6th May 1964*; Worsdall; McFadzean*; Michael Donnelly, Glasgow Stained Glass, a preliminary study, Glasgow 1981; G&W*; McKean*; BofS; J.H.D. Horne, Macdiss 1984; Karen Lambert, Macdiss 1995; S&McK*; ATSN no.8 October 1993, no.12 January 1995, Brian Park in no.13 May 1995*, Colin McKellar in no.15 January 1996 & no.(21) May 1998; List

The grandest terrace in Glasgow: an unprecedented composition of large two-storey houses on a terrace but with two pairs of three-storey houses placed neither at the ends nor in the centre. For Albert Richardson, Thomson “here... showed the greatest restraint and it is no exaggeration to say that a finer example of Victorian architecture of similar character does not exist.” Gildard, in discussing the abstraction of the design and the remorseless regularity of the fenestration, noted that “the windows have no dressings, but Greek goddesses could afford to appear undressed...” Henderson was the developer of Great Western Terrace but he died insolvent in 1870 before any houses were finished, so Thomson's client, legally, was Anderson, a power loom cloth manufacturer, who owed £263 at Thomson's death (paid in 1877).

Eight houses were completed during Thomson's lifetime; nos 9-11 were built later and finished internally under the direction of J.J. Burnet. No.7 was decorated by Thomson, possibly with Daniel Cottier, for the publisher, Robert Blackie; Thomson wrote to his brother in 1872 that “We have had a very tedious and bothersome business with Robert Blackie's House in Great Western Terrace. Rodger and he are working at cross purposes and I dont know how matters will be settled - We are now getting on with the painting of it with the Brothers Orr in the usual pernickitty way.” (Rodger was presumably of the firm of Murdoch & Rodger, solicitors.) No.8 was later occupied by Sir William Burrell, who employed Robert Lorimer to spoil the interior; No.4, occupied by 1871 by James W. Macgregor, retired tobacco merchant, retains a double-height hall by Thomson (as well as Gothic work, possibly by Middleton, of Cheltenham, by whom there is a similar room in the Bowes Museum, County Durham) and was restored by Page & Park 1994 after compulsory purchase by Glasgow District Council. New retaining wall to forecourt terrace combined with modification and reorientation of staircases at ends designed by James Stevens Curl for William Whitfield in 1973 to allow for the widening of Great Western Road.

680-701 GREAT WESTERN ROAD / KERSLAND STREET

?New terrace of houses, c.1870-75

Walker

No documentary evidence

1-9 NORTHPARK TERRACE, 35-51 HAMILTON DRIVE, Hillhead

New terrace of nine houses, for William Henderson, 1863-65

Memorial; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W*; BofS; Peter Reed, 'The Victorian Suburb' in Peter Reed, ed., Glasgow: The Forming of the City, Edinburgh 1993; List; Colin McKellar in ATSN no.(21) May 1998*

Built on the site of Northpark House between two pre-existing lengths of Hamiltonpark Terrace.

NORTH PARK

‡Unexecuted feuing plan for development, 1862

Plan in Mitchell

McFadzean

The plan was “prepared to shew a proposed improvement in the boundary between North Park Lands and the Botanic Garden.”

SESSIONAL SCHOOL, COLLEGE OPEN, HIGH STREET

†New schoolhouse, for Blackfriars Parish, 1854

Demolished 1870s?

Building Chronicle 5th June 1854 p.24; Builder 12th August 1854, p.425; Walker; Worsdall; McFadzean

According to the Builder, this was “a schoolhouse in the vicinity of the College Church, High-street, in the old Scottish style; architects, Messrs. Baird and Thomson.” The Building Chronicle noted that it was in a “style of architecture similar to that of the University, to which it is contiguous.” The 1st edition 1:500 Ordnance Survey map, surveyed in 1857, gives the plan of the class rooms of the ‘College School’ on a confined site to the south-west of the College Church, accessible from the College Open off the High Street. It lay just south of the buildings of the old College and was presumably removed along with them after the University debunked to Gilmorehill.

(off) HIGH STREET

‡Schematic proposal for tenements with glass-roofed streets for Glasgow City Improvement Trustees - see under IDEAL SCHEMES AND UNIDENTIFIED DESIGNS

HOLMWOOD HOUSE, see NETHERLEE ROAD, Cathcart

190-192 HOSPITAL STREET, Hutchesontown, see CALEDONIA ROAD CHURCH

DIXON STREET / HOWARD STREET, ST ENOCH SQUARE

Unexecuted design for warehouse partly in cast-iron, for John Blair, hatmaker, c.1851-52

Two elevation drawings in Mitchell

Henry-Russell Hitchcock, 'Early Cast-Iron Facades', Architectural Review cix, February 1951*; Law*; McFadzean*; G&W; AA*; McKean*; S&McK*; ATSN no.20 January 1998*

This remarkable and celebrated project for a warehouse with large areas of iron-framed glazing survives only in two drawings in the Mitchell Library collection. The dating is uncertain; but both are watermarked 1851 and one, labelled 'Elevation to Dixon Street' is signed 'Baird & Thomson' with the 112 Hope Street address, which the architects left in c.1853. The two elevations depict slightly different schemes, one with an additional floor, but both are in the same abstracted Grecian manner. The client also commissioned Baird & Thomson to build The Knowe in Albert Drive, Pollokshields, q.v.

For images, go here.

BLAIRS, 17-19 DIXON STREET / 32-38 HOWARD STREET, ST ENOCH SQUARE

†New warehouse with shops below, for John Blair, hatmaker, 1853

Demolished 1966

Survey drawings of 1901 by John Nisbet, architect, and of 1951 by James Bunyan, architect, in Glasgow City Archives in Mitchell

Worsdall; G&W; McFadzean; Dominic d'Angelo in ATSN no.20 January 1998*

As built, the warehouse for John Blair had solid stone facades, with a symmetrical range along Howard Street with a central porch; only a short range in Dixon Street was executed which may have been intended to continue further south. The low attic towers show the influence of von Klenze’s Propylaeum in Munich but the treatment of the corner panels below as an abstracted grid, responding to vertical and horizontal continuities, was quite novel while the handling of the curved corner was subtle and unusual. This would seem to have been Thomson’s first executed Grecian design as well as his first important urban building. It was later occupied by Cooper & Co., general merchants.

For images, go here.

WESTBOURNE TERRACE, 29-31 HYNDLAND ROAD

New terrace of 10 houses, for J.W. Anderson?, and David Clow, 1870-71

Memorial; Gildard; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W*; BofS; S&McK*; List

Built on land belonging to J.W. Anderson (see Great Western Terrace); four houses complete at 1871 census; nos.1 & 2 built by David Clow, no.3 was purchased by James Murdoch of Murdoch & Rodger, writers. A masterly, monumental essay in asymmetry within overall symmetry and the first terrace in which Thomson incorporated the bay window, at first floor level. Cast-iron railings and lamps restored 1994.

FOUNTAIN, KELVINGROVE PARK

‡Unexecuted competition design for Loch Katrine Monument, 1870

Building News 16th September 1870 pp.209; McFadzean; ATSN no.(21) May 1998*

An entry was submitted by ‘Athenian’ which was the pseudonym used by Thomson in the South Kensington Museum competition, q.v. The Glasgow correspondent of the Building News [Gildard?] was

“immediately attracted by a large drawing (about 10ft. by 7ft.) which, along with a number of smaller ones, illustrates a design in the greek style. It is under the motto 'Athenian,' but its author is at once identified as a gentleman who has long been celebrated for his successful treatment of that style. It consists of a basin 200ft. in diameter, round which lions are placed at intervals. On the stage above this are placed serpents, and above this again rises a Doric temple, measuring 42ft. across. This is surmounted by a second temple, surrounded by eagles, from the top of which rises, amid a cluster of palm leaves, a huge pole like the mast of a vessel, which, at the height of 100ft. from the ground, breaks out again into palm leaves, and, rising 20ft. or 30ft. higher, throws into the air a jet of water. From the base of this pole water is thrown into the outer basin in a circle about 100ft. in diameter. This design is the most imposing and, I may add, the most expensive.”

A elevation on tracing paper pasted into the sketchbook of Thomson's son John, begun in 1876, corresponds with the description of this lost design. In the event, no prize was awarded and, after a second competition, a rather more modest Stewart Memorial Fountain commemorating the introduction of water from Loch Katrine was designed by James Sellars and erected 1871-72.

'THE SIXTY STEPS', KELVINSIDE TERRACE WEST / QUEEN MARGARET PLACE

New public stairway and retaining wall, 1872

Daily Record 1936; Worsdall; Henry Brougham Morton, A Hillhead Album, Glasgow 1973*; McFadzean*; List

The new stairway - known as ‘The Sixty Steps’ - connected with the Queen Margaret Bridge or Walker's Bridge across the River Kelvin, erected in 1870 and demolished in 1970. Originally there were cast-iron lamps to the same exotic design as on the front of the Queen’s Park Church, q.v. removed during the Second World War as scrap-metal.

DARNLEY TERRACE, 98-130 KILMARNOCK ROAD, Shawlands

†?New terrace of five houses, 1854

Demolished c.1965

Attribution by Worsdall; in Tudor style. According to Mrs Stewart, who erroneously named the buildings Bute Terrace, Thomson and his family moved into No.4 from South Apsley Place in Hutchesontown in 1857 and lived here until the house in Moray Place, q.v., was ready - at the 1861 Census Thomson was at No.3 Darnley Terrace. In the recollections of Joanna Logie [National Trust for Scotland], 1994, she recalled her grandparents’ generation and how

“I would be shown houses which ‘father’ had built. They also taught me not to look at shops at street level but to look up at the architecture. And of course going into town on tramcars, the wonderful old tenements on Eglinton Street & down Cumberland St. which were slums by then. Also, Darnley Terrace in Shawlands where the shopping centre now stands and where they lived before Moray Place was built.”

GRANTLY TERRACE, 196-200 KILMARNOCK ROAD / 1 CARMENT DRIVE, Pollokshaws

?New block of tenements, or ‡unexecuted design for new tenements, 1878 or c.1861

Amelia

Single storey shops now built in front; subsequently balanced by a similar block on the opposite, south corner of Carment Drive; Nos 1 & 2 Grantly Terrace were occupied by the time of the 1881 Census and the plot had been feued to the firm of J. & T. Barrie in 1878, so making any attribution to Thomson rather than to Turnbull highly unlikely; yet “Grantly Terrace” was listed in the memoir apparently written by his daughter; the fact that it was not cited in the similar memoir prepared by the Revd John Stark for the Thomson Memorial implies that this was a mistake. The Charter of Novodamus of October 1877 by Sir William Stirling Maxwell and a Disposition in July 1861 by Sir John Maxwell to John Stewart suggests that Thomson might have been involved in earlier proposals to develop this site.

KING STREET, see GIBSON STREET

MARIA VILLA or DOUBLE VILLA, LANGSIDE, see MANSIONHOUSE ROAD

LANGSIDE ACADEMY, LANGSIDE AVENUE, see CAMPHILL AVENUE

QUEEN’S PARK U.P. CHURCH, LANGSIDE ROAD

†New church and hall, for Queen's Park United Presbyterian Church congregation, 1868-69

Builder: John McIntyre

£6,922:6:2d (including architects' fee of £314:5:0d)

Destroyed by enemy action, 24th March 1943.

Perspective (damaged) at GSA; measured drawings by A. Rollo 1899 & John Jeffrys 1930 at RCAHMS; drawing of the entrance by William J. Anderson in private collection: this was published as the frontispiece of his Architectural Studies in Italy, Glasgow 1890, as Anderson's measured drawings of the church, made in 1887, subsequently lithographed and now lost, won him the first Alexander Thomson Travelling Studentship.

Building News 7th February 1868 p.91 & 11th September 1868; British Architect 1st May 1874, p.282*; J. Logan Aikman, Historical Notices of the United Presbyterian Congregations in Glasgow, Glasgow 1875; Memorial; Building News 13th April 1888* & 27th April 1888*; Gildard; APSD; Evening Times 9th October 1893; Architecture, i, 1896, pp.58-60 (Anderson's drawing of entrance)*; Barclay*; Builder 31st December 1910*; Queen's Park East United Free Church Glasgow Jubilee Book 1867-1917, Glasgow 1918*; Glasgow Herald 22nd December 1924*; Andrew L. Drummond, The Church Architecture of Protestantism, Edinburgh 1934*; Glasgow Herald 25th March 1943*; British Weekly 27th May 1943; Law*; Stewart; Francis Worsdall, '"Greek" Thomson', Scottish Field, cxxiii, February 1962*; Worsdall; Crook*; G&W*; McFadzean*; Frank Worsdall, The City That Disappeared, Glasgow 1981*; Michael Donnelly, Glasgow Stained Glass, a preliminary study, Glasgow 1981; AA*; McKean*; Sally Joyce Rush in S&McK*; Dominic d'Angelo in ATSN no.9 February 1994*, no.19 August 1997*; Glendinning, MacInnes & MacKechnie, A History of Scottish Architecture, Edinburgh 1996*

Thomson’s most extraordinary, inventive and richly decorated church. Congregation founded in 1866; the church was built for 1,200 sittings in 1868-69 following the appointment of the Revd William Sprott as minister in 1867 [see Craigton Cemetery]. Early in 1868, the author of ‘Gossip from Glasgow’ in the Building News [Gildard?], in discussing the “Battle of the Styles,” recorded that “we are to have a competition strictly limited - limited not as to ‘natural selection,’ but as to style, ‘Grecian or Gothic’ having been discovered by some United Presbyterians to be the only style worthy of such a building as a church.” This presumably referred to the Queen’s Park Church as he later noted that, “in the battle of the styles Greek has just accomplished another rather considerable triumph...” as, in the competition, “Messrs. Thomson entered Greek, and, notwithstanding all the eloquence that has been expended in enforcing again and again that Gothic is the only style for churches, the Classic conquered” (although the design was as much Egyptian as Greek).

The church was opened in November 1869; Aikman noted that, “besides the ordinary galleries at each side and at one end, there is a gallery behind the platform, and a second tier opposite. The artificial lighting is peculiar. The platform is lighted by candelabra, but the body of the Church by jets, projecting, at intervals of seven inches, from piping laid on two sides, and one end along the entablature. The interior finishing is wholly of wood, no plaster whatever being in any part of the building, and, with the exception of an ornament over each door to the platform, there is no carving. The decoration is obtained by designs in colour, from drawings by the architects. The effect of the interior is rich and harmonious, and is among the best expressions in this country of the spirit of Greek art.” The font was the work of J.& G. Mossman and the polychromatic interior decoration together with the stained glass windows carried out in collaboration with Daniel Cottier.

In 1893 the Glasgow Evening Times recorded that Ford Madox Brown had seen inside the church in 1883 and said that “I want nothing better than the religion that produced art like that. Here line and colouring are suggestive of Paradise itself... Well done Glasgow! I put... this Thomson-Cottier church above everything I have seen in modern Europe.” The glazing above the entrance consisted of two continuous strips of glass, the inner one patterned, with virtually no mullions, placed between and independent of the free-standing stone columns on the outside and the two internal rows of thin iron internal columns which supported the dome: “Who else would have dared to carry that heavy stone dome, or whatever you call the object that crowns the church, on clusters of iron columns coming down through a gallery,” Henry-Russell Hitchcock wrote to Graham Law in 1950. In 1880 the interior was altered by Alexander Skirving to accommodate an organ and an additional hall built to the rear of the church; interior restored 1884? W.J. Anderson’s measured drawings of the church were exhibited at South Kensington and at the Glasgow Exhibition in 1888. In 1900 it became the Queen's Park East United Free Church and in 1929 Queen's Park St George's Church. In 1924 the organ was reconstructed and enlarged with a new organ screen and the interior decoration restored under the direction of Thomson's son John together with his older sister Elizabeth Forrest:

“In the decoration of the building the original scheme of outline and colouring has been faithfully copied, lavish use being made of the Greek key, the honeysuckle flower, and lotus leaf. On the front of the gallery there is a beautiful example of eastern ornamentation in the combination of honeysuckle and lotus in varied forms, the length of it being relieved at intervals by panels of gold, centred with rosettes of honeysuckle. In the roof the colouring of the flat beam at the edge is a very early form of Egyptian ornament, while the centre of the roof represents the azure sky with a multitude of stars. This symbol of the open heavens is also found under the vestibule. The roofs over and under the gallery are embellished with bright ornamentation, and the whole scheme gives a strikingly beautiful effect.”

The destruction of this church by incendiary bombs was Scotland's worst architectural loss of the Second World War; William Power wrote to Graham Law in 1949 that “it might have escaped destruction but for the fact that when it was built there was a plasterers’ strike on so the building was completely lined with wood, which went up in a wild blaze.”

For images and further information, go here.

For a talk given on the fiftieth anniversary of the church's destruction, go here.

LILYBANK HOUSE, see 40 BUTE GARDENS

MARIA VILLA or 'DOUBLE VILLA', 25 & 25A MANSIONHOUSE ROAD, Langside

New pair of semi-detached houses, with †coachhouse, ?for Henry Watson, clothier, 1856-57

£2,249:11:4½d

Drawings (of modified design) in Blackie*

Architect 19th June 1869 p.318*; Memorial; Gildard; Barclay; Law; Worsdall; McFadzean*; S. Clarke & G.A. Grams, Macdiss. 1983*; AA*; McKean*; John McKean, '"Greek" Thomson's Double Villa' in The Architects' Journal 19th February 1986*; G&W*; BofS; Ian Gow, The Scottish Interior, Edinburgh 1992, pp.94-95; S&McK*; List

One of Thomson's most innovative and celebrated designs: two houses of identical plan, with one rotated through 180°, to create two pairs of identical asymmetrical elevations on what is seemingly a single Picturesque Grecian villa. The whole house was originally known as ‘Maria Villa, Langside Hill’. At the 1861 Census, Henry Watson, ‘clothier’ (of Lockharts & Watson), and his wife Maria were in one house and James Gibb, ‘landed proprietor’, in the other half. The Architect in 1869 noted “some of the peculiarities of Scottish planning, notably the down-stairs bed-room and the upstairs drawing-room.” The coachhouse next to entrance in Millbrae Road demolished 1973; lower part of garden next Millbrae Road built over with flats late 1980s. An unexecuted feuing plan for Langside of 1853, for Neale Thomson of Camphill, with inner and outer crescents of villas, had been prepared by Alexander George Thomson.

303-321 MARYHILL ROAD / 2 HENDERSON STREET

?New block of tenements

Demolished??

Walker

No documentary evidence

QUEEN'S CROSS, 504-554 MARYHILL ROAD / 897-925 GARSCUBE ROAD

†New block of tenements with shops below, 1875

Demolished in phases c.1980

McFadzean; Iain B. Miller 'Three Thomson Tenements' Macdiss 1980*; AA*; S&McK*

Large block of four-storey tenements running along two streets, with a two-storey shop placed at the acute corner, completed in 1875. The Queen's Cross Church designed by C.R. Mackintosh for Honeyman & Keppie later rose on the opposite side of Garscube Road.

MARYWOOD (PRINCES) SQUARE, Strathbungo, see under OBJECTS: LAMPPOST

MATHIESON STREET, Hutchesontown

?New hall, for Missionary Association of the Caledonia Road Church, 1871

J. Logan Aikman, Historical Notices of the United Presbyterian Congregations in Glasgow, Glasgow 1875

Demolished

In his account of the Caledonia Road Church, q.v., Aikman recorded that "the Missionary Association of the Church, after having carried on evangelistic work in the destitute localities in and near to Commercial Road, where they were cradled as a congregation, erected, at considerable expense, commodious Mission premises in Matheson Street in 1871." As Thomson had been one of the original elders of and worshipped at the Caledonia Road Church, it is surely likely that he was involved with the design of this mission hall, which was on the east side of the street, just north of Rutherglen Road.

GARROWHILL HOUSE, MAXWELL DRIVE, Baillieston

?Alterations

Worsdall

An 18th century house, now the Garrowhill Institute in the centre of the Garrowhill housing estate.

26 MAXWELL DRIVE, Pollokshields

?†New villa, 1850s

Demolished before 1970

List

Attribution on stylistic grounds; David Walker remembers an “extraordinary development of Seymour Lodge design with timber bays cantilevered out close to ground. Thomson style gatepiers.”

99-101 MAXWELL STREET / 19 FOX STREET

†?Alterations to ground floor

?Demolished

Worsdall

Alterations to an 18th century house, later the Iona Community House; McFadzean writes (1998) of "Huge door pieces with glazed areas either side. This was really a shop front."

2-38 MILLBRAE CRESCENT

?New terrace of houses, c.1876-77

McFadzean; G&W; BofS; List

A long curved terrace by the White Water of Cart, terminated by twin gabled bays at either end; paired porches with a central Egyptian column. Possibly designed by Thomson and carried out by Robert Turnbull after his death. Iron railings &c. restored 1995-96.

40-46 MILLBRAE CRESCENT

?New terrace of four houses, c.1877

Walker; G&W; List

Reference in Sederunt Book: Alexander Thomson, 24th November 1876 [Glasgow City Archives] to three self-contained houses in Millbrae Crescent: loans of £650 were granted on each by the Trustees and George Thomson's Commissioners were involved.

OAKLEA, MILLBRAE ROAD

?New villa

Worsdall

An early Italianate house.

84-92 MILLER STREET

?New warehouse, c.1877

G&W

Probably by Turnbull in style of Thomson.

MONTGOMERIE QUADRANT, see CLEVEDEN ROAD

1-10 MORAY PLACE, Strathbungo

New terrace of ten houses, for Alexander Thomson(?), John McIntyre, builder, & William Stevenson, quarrier, c.1859-61

Builder: John McIntyre

about £5,600?

Drawings of No.1 Moray Place with extension by John Binnie Wilson 1900 in Glasgow City Archives

Amelia; Memorial; Gildard, Law*; Hitchcock*; Stewart; J.M. Reid, Glasgow, London 1956*; Architects' Journal 6th May 1964* & 20th November 1974*; Worsdall; G&W*; Crook*; McFadzean*; Thomas Thomson, Macdiss. 1980*; AA*; McKean*; BofS; Gavin Stamp, 'Sash windows, Moray Place' in Architects' Journal 27th November 1991*; Stamp in S&McK*; Glendinning, MacInnes & MacKechnie, A History of Scottish Architecture, Edinburgh 1996*; List

Described by Henry-Russell Hitchcock as "with little question the finest of all 19th century terraces, both in design and execution, and one of the world's most superb pieces of design based on Greek precedent" and possibly the first speculative terrace in which Thomson had an interest, although this is not certain. Two storey symmetrical composition, with the end houses having projecting temple-fronted bays; intervening houses unified by first-floor colonnade, with every sixth interval blank at position of party wall. Special tall chimney-pots with lotus-shaped tops. Built on site parallel to pre-existing railway cutting (line opened 1848). Thomson himself and his family moved into No.1 Moray Place in 1861; John Shields, his measurer, took No.3 and No.2 was bought by John McIntyre. After the death of Thomson's widow, Jane Nicholson, in 1899, No.1 was extended with a wing designed by John Binnie Wilson in 1900. The two end houses - nos.1 & 10 - cost £710; the intervening houses £510-525. All interiors detailed by Thomson and most survive intact; cast-iron lamps between pairs of front doors subsequently removed - a modern restored cast is now in the garden of no.10, Treemain Road, Whitecraigs, Glasgow.

11-17 MORAY PLACE

?New terrace of houses, 1864-65

G&W; List

Possibly by A. & G. Thomson but the crudeness of the design compared with 1-10 Moray Place makes an attribution to Alexander Thomson himself unlikely; local tradition insists that the first terrace in Moray Place was too expensive and that Thomson was not permitted to design the subsequent terraces built in the Regent Park development.

REGENT PARK, Strathbungo

?Feuing plan, for John McIntyre & William Stevenson, c.1860

Plans in Mitchell

Maurice Lindsay, 'Strathbungo, Glasgow', Scottish Field January 1977; BofS; Peter Reed, 'The Victorian Suburb' in Peter Reed, ed., Glasgow: The Forming of the City, Edinburgh 1993

1-10 Moray Place was the first part of the Regent's Park development on land feued from Sir John Maxwell between the Glasgow, Neilston & Barrhead Direct Railway (1848) and the new Queen's Park. Local tradition insists that Thomson laid out the streets: Moray Place and the parallel streets off Pollokshaws Road: Regent Park Square, Queen Square & Princes (Marywood) Square. The first unexecuted feuing plan of 1858 was for detached villas and was made by Thomas Kyle, who may have made subsequent plans. Thomson' seems not to have been responsible for any buildings other than the first terrace in Moray Place. A street lamp-post probably designed by Thomson and cast by the Oak Foundry survives in Marywood Square (another is in Queen's Drive), q.v. under OBJECTS.

MOSSMAN'S STUDIO, see NORTH FREDERICK STREET

GLASGOW NECROPOLIS: BEATTIE MONUMENT

New tomb monument, for the congregation of the St Vincent Street Church, c.1867-70

Made by J. & G. Mossman

Memorial; Worsdall; Mossman; McFadzean; Alexander Stoddart in S&McK*

Thomson’s most impressive and innovative cemetery monument. The Revd Alexander Ogilvie Beattie, who died in 1858, was the minister of the Gordon Street U.P. Church and, had he lived, would have been the first minister of the St Vincent Street Church, whose congregation, in 1867, subscribed £75 to both the Beattie and Middleton monuments in the Necropolis. The monument is placed on a slope and rises from a projecting plinth of cyclopaean masonry.

GLASGOW NECROPOLIS: BLACKIE MONUMENT

?New monument for Robert Blackie, publisher

Made by J. & G. Mossman

Mossman

In 1877, 65 letters were cut and gilded on a granite monument in the Necropolis for Mr Blackie of Stanhope Street.

GLASGOW NECROPOLIS: INGLIS MONUMENT

?New tomb monument, for John Inglis, c.1868

Made by J. & G. Mossman

Worsdall

Thomsonian obelisk raised by John Inglis for his wife, A?? Macnab, who died in 1868.

GLASGOW NECROPOLIS, ?MALLOCH MONUMENT

?New grave monument, for Charles Malloch, 1871

£56

Made by J. & G. Mossman

Mossman

Charles Malloch was a generous subscriber to the Alexander Thomson Memorial. Mossman's records note that in 1871 he had decided on a monument, and in 1875 had 45 letters cut on the Blyths Monument in the Necropolis.

GLASGOW NECROPOLIS: MIDDLETON MONUMENT

New tomb obelisk, for the congregation of the St Vincent Street Church, c.1867

Memorial; Alexander Stoddart in S&McK*

Damaged by theft of bronze plaques

The Revd George Marshall Middleton, first minister of the St Vincent Street Church died in 1866 and the following year the congregation subscribed £75 for both this and the monument to the Revd A.O. Beattie in the Necropolis.

GLASGOW NECROPOLIS: MITCHELL MONUMENT

?New grave monument, for J.D. Mitchell, 1876

Made by J. & G. Mossman

Mossman

Thomson & Turnbull designed the "large granite ledger" placed over a vault for Mr Mitchell of Howard Street; at the same time the "upper part of monument" was taken down, refaced and the inscription recut.

GLASGOW NECROPOLIS: STEEL MONUMENT

?New tomb monument, for executors of James Steel

Made by J. & G. Mossman, c.1858

Attribution by Worsdall

GLASGOW NECROPOLIS: STRANG MONUMENT

?New tomb monument, for executors of John Strang

Made by J. & G. Mossman, c.1863

Attribution by Worsdall

HOLMWOOD HOUSE, 61-63 NETHERLEE ROAD, Cathcart

New villa, for James Couper, paper manufacturer, 1857-58

House: £2,608:4:11d; stable, green house & outbuildings: £1,009:19:6d; gates: £75:2:0d

Drawings (of modified design) in Blackie*; cartoons for dining room frieze in Mitchell

Builder 4th July 1868 p.482 (review of Blackie); Amelia; Memorial; Gildard; APSD; Barclay; Builder 31st December 1910*; Law; Stewart; McFadzean*; Francis Worsdall, '"Greek" Thomson', Scottish Field, cxxiii, February 1962*; Worsdall; Francis Worsdall, 'The Achievement of "Greek" Thomson', Scotland's Magazine, July 1966; Crook*; G&W*; McKean*; Ian Gow, The Scottish Interior, Edinburgh 1992, p.95*; Ian Gow in S&McK*; Gavin Stamp in Country Life 20th July 1995*; Anne Ellis in ATSN no.16 May 1996*; Glendinning, MacInnes & MacKechnie, A History of Scottish Architecture, Edinburgh 1996*; Gavin Stamp in ATSN no.18 February 1997*; List; (Caroline MacGregor) National Trust for Scotland, 'Holmwood: Management Plan 1996-2001', 1997 (typescript); Gavin Stamp, in 1999 Magazine 2, 1998*; Gavin Stamp, ‘“At Once Classic and Picturesque...” Alexander Thomson’s Holmwood’, in Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 57:1 March 1998*

Thomson's finest and most elaborate villa was built for James Couper who, with his brother Robert, owned the Millholm paper mill in the valley of the White Water of Cart below and who had earlier lived in Braehead Villa in Netherlee Road, q.v. 'Sunnyside', the adjacent villa designed by James Smith for Robert Couper, was demolished in c.1966. Holmwood was orientated towards the view of Cathcart Castle, demolished by Glasgow District Council in 1980.

Gildard wrote that

"The Holmwood Villa, made familiar to us by Messrs. Blackie’s book, has deprived us of either asking or answering the question, Is an architect an artist? If architecture be poetry in stone-and-lime - a great temple an epic - this exquisite little gem, at once classic and picturesque, is as complete, self-contained, and polished as a sonnet. The connecting of the offices with the villa by the unbroken long line of possibly a garden wall, is an impressive instance of the value of a continuous horizontality."

The elaborate interior scheme of polychromatic decoration was designed by Thomson and executed by Campbell Tait Bowie (there is no firm evidence that Daniel Cottier worked here); the dining room has a frieze of panels enlarged from John Flaxman's illustrations of Homer's Iliad while the drawing room was originally decorated with canvas panels illustrating Tennyson's Idylls of the King (published 1859) painted by Hugh Cameron (and since lost). The sculpture on the hall chimneypiece was by George Mossman. According to Gildard, "besides the decoration, much of the furniture, solid and textile, was designed by Mr Thomson." Holmwood was altered in the 1920s by the owner, James Gray; gardener's cottage demolished 1970s. Acquired by the National Trust for Scotland from the Sisters of Our Lady of the Missions 1994 and restored by Page & Park architects 1997-98 undoing 1920s alterations and rebuilding the connecting wall. Publication of the (refined) design for Holmwood in Blackie produced at least one clone, in Adelaide, South Australia, q.v. Couper was buried in Old Cathcart Cemetery, q.v.

BRAEHEAD VILLA, 74-76 NETHERLEE ROAD, Cathcart

New pair of semi-detached houses, for Robert Couper, paper manufacturer, c.1853

Worsdall; Jean Marshall, Why Cathcart?, Glasgow 1969

Attribution confirmed by David Walker; a pair of stone houses in Thomson's austere Gothic manner, for Robert Couper and his brother James, owners of the Millholm paper mill, who would later build Sunnyside and Holmwood House nearby, see above. Worsdall maintained that it was originally one house and divided in 1855. The Couper brothers also asked Thomson to build a very similar, semi-detached pair of houses in Cove (now Ashlea & Ellerslie, q.v.) as summer residences. In the 1858-59 Post Office Directory, Mrs Forbes was at Braehead villa. Front wall rebuilt in late 1960s for road widening, when the original single central entrance leading to twin flights of steps to the front gardens was replaced by entrances at either end.

18-76 NITHSDALE ROAD (TITWOOD PLACE) / 65 NITHSDALE STREET, Strathbungo

New block of tenements with shops below, 1876

McFadzean*; G&W; BofS; S&McK*; List

A very severe design probably designed by Thomson and executed by Robert Turnbull after his death; three storey tenements running along Nithsdale Road with a single storey shop with circular pavilion at acute street corner. Titwood Place was renamed Nithsdale Road when the former east end of that road became Nithsdale Street.

LORNE TERRACE, 256-280 DARNLEY STREET / 84-124 NITHSDALE ROAD / 281-289 KENMUIR STREET

New block of tenements, c.1871-73-

Builder: John McIntyre?

Building News 13th April 1888, p.528; Walker; Worsdall; McFadzean; G&W; S&McK*; List; Gillian Dickson, Macdiss. 1998*; Ronald Smith, Pollokshields: Historical Guide and Heritage Walk, Glasgow 1998*

Very large continuous block of tenements completed by Turnbull after Thomson's death. Four closes completed at the 1871 Census, and before his death in 1872, Thomson's friend, the builder John McIntyre, had moved to Lorne Terrace. In 1888, the Building News mentioned "... Moray-place... and Lorne-terrace, Nithsdale-road, Pollokshields: both of these are immediately adjacent to Strathbungo Railway Station, and show very effective elevations executed at a minimum of cost."

ELLISLAND, 200 NITHSDALE ROAD, Pollokshields

New villa, for William Johnston, gas fitting manufacturer, c.1871

Memorial; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W*; McKean*; BofS; S&McK*; List

Ellisland is a single storey building and unusual not least as Thomson's only symmetrical villa; Egyptian columns flanking the entrance with partial polychromy. Interior restored 1990s. The villa was not yet occupied at the time of the 1871 Census; Johnston's firm, Johnston, Fraser & Co., were the Thomson brothers' tenants in their Gordon Street building, q.v.

CASTLEHILL, 202 NITHSDALE ROAD, Pollokshields

New villa, for Robert Young, wholesale provision merchant, c.1871

Memorial; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W*; BofS; ATSN no.16 May 1996; List

This villa was not occupied at the time of the 1871 Census and the ground was purchased from John McIntyre in November 1871. Possibly enlarged to the west after initial build, and billiard room added to the east by Thomson. Decorative timber infill to gable ends removed, c.197?

12-24 NORFOLK STREET / 32-68 GORBALS STREET / OXFORD STREET, Gorbals Cross

†New block of tenements, with shops below, 1874

Demolished 1975

McFadzean*; G&W; ATSN no.8 October 1993; Brian Edwards in S&McK; Eric Eunson, The Gorbals: An Illustrated History, Ochiltree 1996*

Part of the Glasgow City Improvement scheme in the Gorbals planned by the City Architect, John Carrick, with new splayed corners at Glasgow Cross. Under the 1865 proposals, Norfolk Street was continued eastwards to Main Street, renamed Gorbals Street, replacing Malta Street; Oxford Street was extended eastwards to replace Kirk Street. Thomson's tenement continued the facade design of his earlier tenement at 26-44 Norfolk Street, q.v.

26-44 NORFOLK STREET, Gorbals Cross

†New tenement with shops below, 1860-61

Demolished 1974

McFadzean*; Eric Eunson, The Gorbals: An Illustrated History, Ochiltree 1996*

STUDIO, CATHEDRAL STREET / 83 NORTH FREDERICK STREET

†New sculptor's studio, for J.& G. Mossman, sculptors, 1854

Demolished c.1893

Measured drawing of North Frederick Street elevation & details by James B. Fulton 1893 in GSA

Building Chronicle 26th July 1854 p.52; Memorial; Gildard; Thomas Gildard, 'The late John Mossman' in Proceedings of the Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow, 1891-92; Barclay; Walker; Worsdall; McFadzean; Gavin Stamp in ATSN no.8 October 1993* & Alexander Stoddart in no.9 February 1994*; Alexander Stoddart in S&McK*

No record of the Cathedral Street elevation of this building survive. Gildard, who described it, noted that,

"The studio which Mr. Thomson designed for his old and intimate friend, Mr. Mossman, was one of his first works that attracted the particular attention of other architects as art-critics. In quality of composition, if not also of detail, I do not know if, in any of his subsequent works, he has surpassed it. The site, the corner of two streets, one of which is level, the other having a considerable inclination, is taken advantage of with consummate skill as regards both artistic design and utility. Along the level street the walling is of cyclopean masonry, pierced by a doorway which, from its still being on a level with the surface within, serves the purpose of 'bank' loading, and on each side of it, by three openings, having broad dwarf pilasters between them, also on each side of the doorway, the extreme piers being of cyclopean work, part of the general walling..."

and again,

"The building, not only characteristic of Thomson's genius at its best, but also costing a considerable sum, indicates the sympathy which the brothers Mossman had with the art of Architecture."

After George Mossman's death in 1863, the monument work was removed to another site further east in Cathedral Street. Worsdall dated the building to 1849-50 and thought it was demolished in 1875, although Gildard did not say that it had gone in 1888. Thomson worked closely with both John and George Mossman, and may have designed the tomb monument to their father, William Mossman, in Sighthill Cemetery, q.v. John Mossman executed a bust of Thomson at the age of 30 (in plaster, now owned by the National Trust for Scotland) and was responsible for the marble bust presented to the Glasgow Corporation Art Galleries as a memorial in 1877 (now in Kelvingrove Museum).

NORTH PARK & NORTHPARK TERRACE, see HAMILTON DRIVE

ETON TERRACE, 41-53 OAKFIELD AVENUE (WILSON STREET) / 18 GREAT GEORGE STREET, Hillhead

New terrace of 8 houses, for William Neilson, builder, c.1862-64

Amelia; Memorial; Law*; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W; BofS; S&McK*; ATSN no.13 May 1995; List; Lindsay C. Quinn, Macdiss. 1998*

Thomson's first terrace after Moray Place, q.v., with the end houses both breaking forward and rising one storey higher; paired porches inspired by the Choragic Monument of Thrasyllus. Nos.1-7 Eton Terrace were purchased by the two Mitchells of Mitchell Allardice & Mitchell, lawyers, in 1862 and six houses were occupied by 1863-64. Wilson Street was subsequently renamed Oakfield Avenue. Most interiors modified, and exterior symmetry spoiled by attic dormer windows; some original features surviving in end house on corner of Great George Street; most cast-iron lamps and railings removed.

ROYAL HORSE BAZAAR, OTAGO (SMITH) STREET, Hillhead

†New stables, for John E. Walker, funeral undertaker, carriage hirer, livery stable keeper, coachbuilder &c., 1872-73

Estimate £7,000-8,000

Demolished c.1934

Drawings in Glasgow City Archives in Mitchell

George; Memorial; Gildard; Young's Glasgow Scraps?, vol.ii, p.28; Walker; Worsdall; McFadzean*; ATSN no.12 January 1995;

In the letter to his brother George, 20th September 1872, Thomson wrote that "John E. Walker sold his stables in Cambridge Street to the Tramways Company and bought the Exhibition Buildings in Bath Street [q.v.] which I converted into Coach House below and stables for about 70 horses above which is now in full operation and he has since bought the unbuilt portion of Ashfield Ground on which we are now building another establishment of about equal dimensions - It fronts Smith Street and I have succeeded in making a very fine Elevation - It is expected to cost from 7 to 8000 pounds." Smith Street was later renamed Otago Street, and the stables were on the north corner of what is now Otago Lane. At the same time Thomson erected a block of tenements further south in Otago Street for Walker, q.v., and another for Andrew Clow in Gibson (formerly King) Street, q.v., at the other end of the site owned by Walker.

79-87 OTAGO (SMITH) STREET, Hillhead

New block of tenements, for John E. Walker, 1874

Drawings in Glasgow City Archives in Mitchell

Walker, McFadzean*

This block lay south of the stables Thomson designed for John E. Walker, q.v. Details of the facade were either simplified in execution or since mutilated.

WEST BANK TERRACE, 94-106 OTAGO STREET / 39-47 GIBSON STREET, Hillhead

?†New block of tenements, 1859-60?

Otago Street range demolished 1992; the Gibson Street block 1996

ATSN no.4, June 1992 & no.16 May 1996

The authorship of these tenements is uncertain, with confusion caused by McFadzean giving this numbering to the Otago Street block designed for John E. Walker nearby, q.v. Quite possibly, these buildings were not by Thomson, but the detailing of the windows was, however, unusual and peculiar. Worsdall dated the block and noted that the demolished West Bank was the residence of John E. Walker.

1-18 WALMER CRESCENT / 1-5 CESSNOCK STREET, PAISLEY ROAD WEST, Cessnock

New street of tenements, for John Hood, junior, house factor & insurance agent, c.1857-62

Gildard; Law*; Hitchcock*; Worsdall; Francis Worsdall, 'The Achievement of "Greek" Thomson', Scotland's Magazine, July 1966*; McFadzean*; Frank Worsdall, The Tenement: A Way of Life, Edinburgh 1979* (2nd ed. Glasgow 1989*); Iain B. Miller, 'Three Thomson Tenements' Macdiss. 1980*; G&W*; Chartered Quantity Surveyor vi, no.12, July 1984*; The Word and the Stones, Glasgow 1990; BofS; S&McK*; Glendinning, MacInnes & MacKechnie, A History of Scottish Architecture, Edinburgh 1996*; List

One of Thomson's most abstract designs, entirely without ornament, forming a crescent but composed entirely of straight elements, both vertical and horizontal; “occupied exclusively by rich merchants.” Composition spoiled by later addition of single storey shops across chord of crescent along Paisley Road West in c.1903-08. Repaired 1983-84.

520-532 PAISLEY ROAD WEST / 53 IBROXHOLME AVENUE

?New block of tenements, 1882-83

Walker

Unlikely attribution; dated by Worsdall.

78-104 PARK ROAD, Kelvinside

New block of tenements, c.1880

Walker; McKean*

Posthumous work, by Turnbull? Attribution denied by McFadzean and now by David Walker, and BofS says possibly by Horatio K. Bromhead, c.1890.

74 PARTICK HILL ROAD

?New house

G&W

In Rundbogenstil, probably not by Thomson although internal details may suggest otherwise.

PLEASANCE STREET, Shawlands

†?New block of tenements

Demolished c.1959

Attribution by McFadzean on stylistic grounds.

36-40 POLLOK STREET, 46-72 HOUSTON STREET, 99-103 WATT STREET, Kingston

†New block of tenements begun 1858

Demolished 1980

Walker; G&W

Dated by Worsdall; attribution confirmed by McFadzean on stylistic grounds.

734-750 POLLOKSHAWS ROAD / 2-8 NITHSDALE ROAD

?New block of tenements

In Thomson’s later manner, but without regularity in fenestration; dated by Worsdall to before 1870 but no documentary evidence for attribution.

POLLOK BURGH SCHOOL, 2097 POLLOKSHAWS ROAD

†New school building, later extended, 1855-56

Demolished 1968

Walker; McFadzean; Worsdall; Francis Worsdall, 'The Achievement of "Greek" Thomson', Scotland's Magazine, July 1966; G&W*; Frank Worsdall, The City That Disappeared, Glasgow 1981*;

Thomson's last essay in his Italianate or Rundbogenstil manner: original building by Baird & Thomson and enlarged by John Baird II in 1874-75; in his letter to John Honeyman of 2nd November 1876 supporting his nomination as a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects, Baird cited "Pollok Academy, Pollokshaws" in a list of seven buildings he claimed responsibility for. Later known as the Pollok School Annexe.

1339, 1349 & 1353 POLLOKSHAWS ROAD, Shawlands

†?New cottages, c.1854

Nos 1339 & 1353 demolished c.1965

Attribution by McFadzean and by Walker. No.1349 Pollokshaws Road is a smaller version of Craig Ailey, Cove. Similar villas stand or stood in Hector Road.

QUEEN'S CROSS, see 504-554 MARYHILL ROAD

QUEEN'S DRIVE, see under OBJECTS: LAMPPOST

QUEEN'S PARK CHURCH, see LANGSIDE ROAD

REGENT'S PARK, see MORAY PLACE

5 ROSSLYN TERRACE, Hillhead, or Pollokshields?

Design for internal decoration

Drawing at Mitchell

Ian Gow in S&McK*

This terrace was not designed by Thomson. The design is similar to that executed in Holmwood House, q.v., and the single surviving drawing bears instructions about the colours to be used.

ROYAL BANK PLACE, see ROYAL EXCHANGE SQUARE

ROYAL INSURANCE BUILDINGS, 40 ROYAL EXCHANGE SQUARE

†New street front, for T.& G. Frame, accountants, 1872

Destroyed

George; Gildard; Worsdall

T.& G. Frame first appear at 40 Royal Exchange Square, immediately next to Royal Bank Place, in the Post Office Directory for 1872-73. Thomson was here working in the formal, Classical urban set piece planned in the 1820s by Archibald Elliott; in the letter to his brother George of 19th January 1872, possibly referring to this job, he wrote that "We have begun operations at the Insurance company property. The Caryatids were objected to by the people at the head office." Gildard considered that "... the front of Messrs. Frame's counting house in Royal Bank Place, which, although apt to be overlooked in the hurried business walk, deserves, for at least some specialities, a careful regard." An undated photograph by Annan of the Royal Exchange in the Mitchell shows in the background a two-storey elevation to the return next the arch through to Royal Bank Place, with a tall window between the pilasters above the stylobate, but when the Royal Insurance Building in Royal Bank Place was rebuilt in 1895-97 by Thomson & Sandilands, the Royal Exchange Square elevation had already been returned to three stories with an entrance. Thomas Frame was the local manager of the Royal Insurance Co. and a trustee of Thomson's trust.

LINCOLN VILLA, 15 ST ANDREW'S DRIVE

†New villa, 1851

Demolished 1963

Memorial; Worsdall; McFadzean

One of four cottages ornés.

MANHATTAN COTTAGE, 16 ST ANDREW'S DRIVE

†New villa, 1851

Demolished 1963

Worsdall; McFadzean

One of four cottages ornés.

GREEN GABLES, 18 ST ANDREW'S DRIVE

†New villa, 1851

Demolished 1963

McFadzean; G&W*

One of four cottages ornés.

BEECH VILLA, 20 ST ANDREW'S DRIVE

†New villa, 1851

Demolished 1963

Memorial; Worsdall; McFadzean

One of four cottages ornés.

EASTWOOD & RHODOVA, 28-30 ST ANDREW'S DRIVE

?New double villa

Demolished?

Walker

Symmetrical Classical pair with low-pitched gables. Also nos. 33-33A. Nos 35-37 by Boucher & Cousland. David Walker recalls that nos. 50 & 55 St Andrew’s Drive played “unusual tricks with the wall planes” and that 39-41 was a double villa more in the manner of John Baird II.

164-178 ST GEORGE'S ROAD / 179-181 SHAMROCK STREET

†?New block of tenements, 1858

Demolished 1970

McFadzean

31-39 ST VINCENT PLACE

†New doorcase and railings

Removed c.1870

Gildard; Worsdall

Gildard referred to "the great door-piece in Saint Vincent Place, for which, because of necessary changes, has lately been substituted the finely proportioned and detailed column-porch by Campbell Douglas & Sellars..." and also to "the area railing in Saint Vincent Place, although now it wants its finials" The lower part of the present building dates from 1870-73.

THE ST VINCENT STREET U.P. CHURCH, 265 ST VINCENT STREET / PITT STREET

New church, for the Gordon Street United Presbyterian Church congregation, 1857-59; hall completed 1867-68

Builder: William Wylie

£15,916:0:3¼d (excluding the cost of the land), plus professional fees of £1,207:7:2d (architects' fee £420)

Measured drawings by Larmont Douglas Penman published in the Glasgow Architectural Association Sketch Book vol.iii, Glasgow 1888, & vol.iv, Glasgow 1894, and in Barclay

Building Chronicle 1st April 1856 p.44, March 1857 p.175 & April 1857 pp.189-190; J. Logan Aikman, Historical Notices of the United Presbyterian Congregations in Glasgow, Glasgow 1875; St Vincent Street U.P. Church Annual Reports, passim.; J. Moyr Smith, 'The Style of the Future', Building News 16th April 1875; British Architect 16th April 1875; [Revd J.E.H. Thomson] Memoir of George Thomson, Cameroon Mountain, West Africa, by one of his nephews, Edinburgh 1881; Amelia; Memorial; Gildard; APSD; Barclay*; Robert Small, History of the Congregations of the United Presbyterian Church from 1733 to 1900, Edinburgh 1904, vol.ii, p.64; The Architects' & Builders' Journal 13th May 1914*; James Fleming, Historical Sketch of the St Vincent Street United Free Church Congregation, Glasgow, Glasgow 1916*; Glasgow Herald 15th October 1923; Builder 11th April 1924*; Joseph Addison, 'Some Aspects of Greek Architecture, Including a Study of the Neo-Grec Style in Europe', Journal of the Royal Institute of British Architects, xxxix, 9th January 1932, pp.178-9*; Weekly Herald 24th March 1934; J.M. Reid, Glasgow, London 1956*; Glasgow Herald 1st & 5th November 1957; The Bulletin 26th October 1957 & 30th January 1960; Glasgow Herald 11th February & 5th November 1965; Worsdall; James Macaulay, 'Greek Thomson in Danger,' Architectural Review cxxxvi, 1964*; Francis Worsdall, 'The Achievement of "Greek" Thomson', Scotland's Magazine, July 1966*; Scottish Daily Express 6th October 1967; Glasgow Herald 11th November 1967; Crook*; McFadzean*; G&W*; McKean*; Andrew Herron, Historical Directory to Glasgow Presbytery, Glasgow 1984 (typescript in Mitchell); Maurice Lindsay, Victorian and Edwardian Glasgow, 1987*; BofS*; S&McK*; Sam McKinstry in ATSN no.8 & passim.* versus James Stevens Curl in ATSN no.12 January 1995 & passim.* (until no.18 February 1997); ATSN no.19 August 1997*; Glendinning, MacInnes & MacKechnie, A History of Scottish Architecture, Edinburgh 1996*; List; Colin McKellar in ATSN no.(21) May 1998

Thomson's only surviving intact church. George Thomson was a member of the Gordon Street U.P. congregation, which he persuaded both to sell its church in Gordon Street (formerly Melville Street) built in 1823 to his firm, A.& G. Thomson in 1856 [see Gordon Street], and to appoint his brother and himself as architects of the new church further west to be built with the proceeds. the land was bought from William Henderson, who had bought it from Lord Blythswood.

The 1881 Memoir of George Thomson records that

"when Dr Beattie's congregation removed from Gordon Street to St Vincent Street, they entrusted to George Thomson the duty of making the plans for the new church. It was really, however, a joint work: while he supplied the general plan and main features, the detail was his brother's; as he admitted himself throughout his brother's disciple, it was easier to secure a harmonious union of each part to the whole. He had the most complete confidence in the ultimate success of his brother's theory of architecture, and belief in its correctness..."

The draft memoir of Thomson by his widow refers to the

“freedom of treatment as compared with former works, the bold manner in which the work is adapted to the site and the peculiarity of the Clerestory of the tower, which latter is to a considerable extent an alteration by his brother of the original design which had become too expensive for the building committee to carry out."

The design for 1,192 sittings (1,380 according to Aikman) was approved on 2nd February 1857 and the foundation stone laid the following May; the church was opened on 16th February 1859. The stone carving was by J.& G. Mossman; cast-iron work by Weir & McElroy and Robert McConnel & Co., and painting by C.T. Bowie: Gildard recorded that "... for some reason, perhaps, more strictly speaking, no reason, the greater opportunity of decorating the Saint Vincent Street Church was denied to [Thomson]." Macaulay in 1964 described "rose-pink walls... vividly embellished with gold and blue and yellow paint." Daniel Cottier, glazier, worked on finishing the hall below the church in 1867-68, when ornamental lamps were placed outside the Pitt Street entrance (since removed). Clock placed in the tower in 1884.

First organ introduced 1892; present organ installed 1904 above existing screen, which was moved forwards by 5 ft 6 inches under direction of Watson & Salmond, architects, for £,1561. Thomson designed monuments for the minister who began the church, the Revd A.O. Beattie, and his successor, the Revd G.M. Middleton , in the Glasgow Necropolis, q.v. “For many years the church was one of the wealthiest in the city. Collections of over £200 on a Sunday were frequently taken at one period, and contributions of bank notes became so numerous that special glass covers were put over the collection plates.”

Condition of stonework causing concern 1934; congregation dissolved 1939 and building sold to the Glasgow Association of Spiritualists; threatened with demolition and appeal for restoration launched 1957; tower struck by lightning 2nd September 1961; building acquired by Glasgow Corporation by compulsory purchase with government assistance c.1963, repaired, redecorated and altered by Sir Frank Mears & Partners in 1967-69 and let to Free Church congregation formerly in Hope Street Free Church. Transferred to Alexander 'Greek' Thomson Church Trust 1997; put on the World Monuments Watch List of 100 Most Endangered Sites 1997.

249-259 ST VINCENT STREET

†New block of tenements with shops below, for William Henderson, 1865-67

Demolished 1967

Memorial; Worsdall; Architectural Review February 1968 p.30; McFadzean; S&McK*; Colin McKellar in ATSN no.(21) May 1998

Facade contiguous with and harmonious with the north elevation of the St Vincent Street Church. Owing to Henderson's financial difficulties, these tenements were not built until after the church. The block was replaced by part of a commercial development with a tower designed by Derek Stephenson & Partners, currently being converted into residential accommodation as 'The Pinnacle'.

187 SANDBANK STREET / 67-77 VIEWMOUNT DRIVE

190-192 SANDBANK STREET / 13-21 CAMPBELL STREET / 3 COTTAR STREET

?New blocks of tenements, 1881-82

Demolished?

Walker

Probably by Turnbull reworking Thomson’s designs for other sites.

SARACEN STREET

?New tenement

Charles McKean in ATSN no.12 January 1995*

Attribution on stylistic grounds. Saracen Street lead to Walter Macfarlane's Saracen Foundry, which cast much of Thomson's ironwork.

WASHINGTON or WAVERLEY TEMPERANCE HOTEL, 126-132 SAUCHIEHALL STREET

†New block of tenements, with shops below, for William Henderson, 1864-66

Converted to an hotel, for Murdoch & Rodger, solicitors, c.1871

Demolished 1935

Photograph at Mitchell

Amelia; Memorial; APSD; J.M.M. Billing, 'Alexander "Greek" Thomson: A study of the re-creation of a style' in RIAS Quarterly, no.62, October 1939*; Worsdall; McFadzean*; G&W*; ATSN no.15 January 1996; Dominic d'Angelo & Colin McKellar in ATSN no.(21) May 1998*

The Washington Temperance Hotel was established here by 1875 and renamed the Waverley Temperance Hotel in the 1880s. The Sederunt Book records that Murdoch & Rodger still owed money in 1876 and that A. & G. Thomson's original estimate for the conversion work was £2,748:9:10d.

GRECIAN BUILDINGS, 336-356 SAUCHIEHALL STREET / 1 SCOTT STREET

New block of commercial premises with shops below, for William Henderson, 1865-68

37?-387 SAUCHIEHALL STREET

?New blocks of tenements, 1850s

Attribution undocumented, but decorative relief panels on these two subtly articulated flat trabeated facades are the same as those on the demolished warehouse in Howard Street, q.v.

471-485 SCOTLAND STREET / 14 SLEADS STREET / 1-7 STANLEY STREET

?New block of tenements, 1865-77

Demolished c.1977

Walker; G&W

No documentary evidence.

ATTWOOD MONUMENT, SIGHTHILL CEMETERY

Tomb monument, for James Attwood, confectioner, c.1852

Worsdall

James Attwood purchased two lairs in 1852

MOSSMAN MONUMENT, SIGHTHILL CEMETERY

?New tomb monument, for the Mossman family, c.1851

Made by J. & G. Mossman

This semi-obelisk monument was raised for the sculptor William Mossman, who died in 1851. As Thomson knew and worked with Mossman's sculptor sons, designed the studio for J. & G. Mossman, q.v. and collaborated with George Mossman (died 1863 and also buried here) on the Garnkirk Urn, q.v., for the Great Exhibition of 1851, it seems probable that he provided the design for this monument. John Mossman purchased one lair in 1847 and two more in 1854.

MUIR MONUMENT, SIGHTHILL CEMETERY

?New monument, for Mrs Isabella Muir, 1871

Made and carved by J. & G. Mossman

Mossman

Mrs Muir, of 20 Albert Drive, may have been a friend of Thomson.

PROVAN MONUMENT, SIGHTHILL CEMETERY

Tomb monument, for executors of William Provan, c.1859

Partly destroyed

Memorial; Gildard; Worsdall; Alexander Stoddart in S&McK*

William Provan, wood merchant, died in 1859 and his executors purchased three lairs in the Sighthill Cemetery that same year; the monument has been badly vandalised and the raised end portion removed.

STEWART MONUMENT, SIGHTHILL CEMETERY

?New monument, for Mrs Isabella Muir, 1874

Made and carved by J. & G. Mossman

Mossman

Mrs Stewart of Kilcreggan ordered a granite monument. Attribution by McFadzean.

THOMSON MONUMENT, SOUTHERN NECROPOLIS, Caledonia Road

†?New tomb monument, for Alexander Thomson, c.1854

Disappeared?

Charlotte Hutt, ed., City of the Dead: The Story of Glasgow's Southern Necropolis, Glasgow 1996

The grave of Alexander Thomson and his family lies unmarked, yet, as he buried five of his children during his lifetime, it is likely that he raised a stone over their grave in the Southern Necropolis which has since been removed. On 17th March 1854, three days after the death of his eldest child, Agnes, Thomson purchased two lairs - 16768 & 16769 - for six guineas.

In a letter to Mrs W.L. Stewart dated 26th March 1960, Worsdall wrote that

"The family grave is near the centre of what is called the Western portion and was originally separate, with a separate entrance, now closed. The company owning the western portion went into liquidation at the end of the last war, in 1945. It remained untouched and unguarded for years. It became the playground and gambling den for the neighbourhood. According to the present curator, about half the tombstones were broken beyond repair, and rumour finally stated that a skull had been seen used as a football in Caledonia Rd. Here the Health authorities stepped in and closed the cemetery. They decided to remove all remaining stones and turn the site into a park, as had been done with the old Gorbals burial ground. However, opposition was so strong that they had to abandon this idea, and instead, they re-erected wherever possible, the remaining tombstones as far as possible on the original site, and spent a lot of money on railing it in, levelling it, etc. It is now quite pleasant. There is, however, definitely no stone on the grave. This seems very surprising, for money was raised in 1875 to erect a public memorial and this took the form of a bust, now in the Art Galleries. Surely the money would have been utilised to erect a stone on his grave were there not already one. There is certainly a space where a stone could have been..."

Thomson was buried here on 26th March 1875.

SPRINGBURN ROAD / ELMVALE STREET

Elmvale St ML.jpg (59788 bytes)

†?New block of tenements and shops

Demolished 1980s

Two storey corner shop very similar to that at the acute corner of the Queen's Cross tenements in Maryhill Road, q.v.

BLACKIE & SON, 17 STANHOPE STREET

Stanhope_St_1.jpg (93158 bytes)

†New printing works, for Blackie & Son, publishers, 1870-71

STOCKWELL STREET

34 Stockwell St ML.jpg (75017 bytes)

?New warehouse with shop below

Demolished

Worsdall

Attribution by Ronald McFadzean; five-bay pilastrade uniting the second and third floors, but supporting an arcade below the entablature.

55 TANTALLON ROAD (ALBERT ROAD) / 2 DIRLETON AVENUE (MAITLAND PLACE)

?New double villa

Demolished

65 TANTALLON ROAD (ALBERT ROAD) / 1 LETHINGTON AVENUE

?New double villa, 1872-73

Demolished

Attribution by Worsdall and McFadzean, but no documentary evidence

110-116 TAYLOR STREET / 125-135 PARSON STREET

?New block of tenements

Begun 1852

Demolished

Walker

No documentary evidence; dating by Worsdall.

NATIONAL BANK OF SCOTLAND, 8 UNION STREET

8 Union St ML.jpg (52590 bytes)

†New shop front & ?interior, for the National Bank of Scotland, c.1870

Demolished c.1929

Building News 21st October 1870, p.293; Rudolph Kenna, Old Glasgow Streets, Glasgow 1990, p.32*

The Building News noted the "branch office of the National [Bank]: Union Street, by Messrs A. & G. Thomson." The bank was on the ground floor of the early 19th century block on the corner of Argyle Street occupied by the Argyle Hotel.

EGYPTIAN HALLS, 84-100 UNION STREET

New commercial premises with 4 shops below, for James Henderson Robertson, iron manufacturer, c.1871-72

84-100 UNION STREET

†Six new cast-iron lamp standards, 1872?

UNIVERSITY, see LONDON: SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM

WALMER CRESCENT, see PAISLEY ROAD WEST

2-16 WATSON STREET / 37-41 GALLOWGATE

2-16 Watson St ML.jpg (32200 bytes)

?New block of commercial premises with shops below, c.1876

Demolished after fire

Walker

A warehouse built under the Glasgow City Improvement scheme with an upper arcaded pilastrade similar to that on the (undocumented) building in Stockwell Street, q.v. and other Thomsonian details, but unlikely to be by Thomson himself at this date so possibly by Turnbull.

17-23 WATSON STREET

New blocks of commercial premises with shops below, for Gavin Bell Miller, 1876

39 WATSON STREET / 118-126 BELL STREET

†New block of commercial premises with shops below, for Gavin Bell Miller, 1876

Demolished 1996

Drawing at Scottish Record Office showing elevations of both blocks

ATSN no.7 June 1993, no.8 October 1993; Brian Edwards in S&McK*; ATSN no.18 February 1997; List

Two adjacent blocks to a consistent monumental trabeated design (one now demolished), built as part of redevelopment under the Glasgow City Improvement scheme. Although the one surviving drawing is dated 1876, the paper is watermarked 1873 so raising the possibility that this was a design by Thomson posthumously erected by Turnbull - a possibility confirmed by the rational economy and sheer elegance of the facades. Iron-framed interiors behind stone facades; stone doorway from the Bell Street block salvaged after demolition.

105-107 WEST REGENT STREET / 120-122 WELLINGTON STREET

[†]Large addition to existing house for commercial use, for Murdoch & Rodger, solicitors, 1872

Interior stripped out 1993; building proposed for replacement by replica 1998

George; Worsdall; McFadzean; Mark Baines in ATSN no.6 January 1993*; List

Murdoch & Rodger bought this early 19th century five bay house in West Regent Street in 1872. Thomson temporarily had his office in this building while he extended it south along Wellington Street, where a large new entrance (inspired by Schinkel's at the Charlottenhof in Potsdam) led to a new staircase. In his letter to his brother George, 20th September 1872, Thomson noted that his new address would be "112 Wellington Street. I expect that it will make a very nice office. It is of two apartments up 7 or 8 steps from the street. I am to have the walls lined with wood for the convenience of sticking up drawings..." Doorcase & railings in West Regent Street by Thomson; chimneypieces in extension salvaged 1993, one now installed in the Parlour at Holmwood House, q.v. The United States’ Consulate was in 107 West Regent Street, 1882-98.

WESTBOURNE TERRACE, see HYNDLAND ROAD

20-27 WESTBOURNE GARDENS SOUTH

New terrace of houses, c.1879

BofS

Posthumous work? David Walker suggests this was the site of the proposed “new Terrace at the back of Clow's range,” i.e., Westbourne Terrace in Hyndland Road, q.v., in 1872, but not fully realised because the Free Church took part of the site; see IDEAL SCHEMES AND UNIDENTIFIED DESIGNS.

156 WEST GEORGE STREET

[?‡]Alterations, for Mitchell Allardice & Mitchell, lawyers, 1859

Plans in Glasgow City Archives

ATSN no.13 May 1995

Adaption of lodging house as offices, probably unexecuted.

160 WEST GEORGE STREET / HOPE STREET

Additions, for Mitchell Allardice & Mitchell, lawyers, 1863

Drawings in Glasgow City Archives

ATSN no.13 May 1995

Addition of attic floor and rear extension to existing house for offices moving from 36 Miller Street to "Moore Place". The additional floor, built to a slightly different design from the drawings, still exists as does the new side porch, but the other work has been subsumed in a further extension along Hope Street.

183 WEST GEORGE STREET

†Reconstruction of older building, for McCraw & Kay, wrights & builders, c.1861?

Demolished

Worsdall

The office of John Baird I was at 183 West George Street until his death in 1859 and in 1861 the building was sold to Thomas Kay who then sold it to his firm, McCraw & Kay, who carried out alterations probably to Thomson's designs. Ronald McFadzean writes 1998, "only its front facade was retained and the interior was then gutted to be replaced by cast-iron columns supporting the floors and allowing uninterrupted floor spans. A top storey was added and a completely new rear wall was formed to the back lane. A double doorway was formed facing West George Street. I have no date or documentary evidence for this and based my opinion entirely on stylistic evidence." The office of A.& G. Thomson moved here from 68 Gordon Street, q.v., by 1862 and moved to 122 Wellington Street, q.v. in 1871; Shields & Duff, measurers, the firm of Thomson's friend John Shields, also had their office here from 1865-66.

99-107 WEST NILE STREET

New office building with shops below, 1858, or 1874?

Amelia; Memorial; Law; Ronald McFadzean, ‘The Last of the Greek...’ in Glasgow Institute of Architects Yearbook 1975*; McFadzean*; G&W; BofS; S&McK*; T. Gunasena, Macdiss 1992; List

An austere and abstract facade, with an upper colonnade of Schinkelesque square piers. Ground floor shops altered; under restoration 1998.

105-107 WEST REGENT STREET, see 120-122 WELLINGTON STREET

9 WINTON DRIVE

?New house

Walker

Posthumous work, which David Walker refers to as a “Glasgow variant of the Lenzie house.”

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HELENSBURGH, Dunbartonshire

ESKVILLE, 20 Glenfinlas Street

?New villa

Memorial; APSD

An unlikely attribution: in Macneur & Bryden's Directory to Helensburgh and Neighbourhood for 1875, Eskville was 20 Glenfinlas Street and occupied by Robert Walker, J.P., a retired cotton spinner; there is no reference to the house in the 1861 and 1871 Censuses, but the name appeared in 1881. Later the house was enlarged and divided into two, but neither half exhibits any evidence of Thomson’s involvement in the design. According to Law, there were two villas by Thomson in Helensburgh, but the compilers of the list of works for the Thomson Memorial may have confused Eskville with ROCKLAND, q.v., as each had a different but eponymous owner.

ROCKLAND (WEST ROCKBANK or ROCKBANK HOUSE), 150 Clyde Street East

New villa, for ?Robert Walker, 1854

McFadzean*

Thomson's first picturesque villa in his Grecian manner, originally called Rockbank House (West Rockbank on maps, to distinguish it from Rockbank, 82 East Clyde Street, immediately to the east) and numbered 80 East Clyde Street; inhabited by Robert Walker, landed proprietor, at the 1861 Census. Walker was a patron of the Helensburgh Horticultural Society and a director of the local Gas Light Company. Roof eaves truncated in 1930s and a conservatory added facing the Clyde estuary; house divided in two in 1980s, with service wing now known as ‘Shoreland’; interior and porch restored 1997.+

ROCKLAND (WEST ROCKBANK) LODGE, Clyde Street East

New gate lodge and gardener's residence, 1854

Addition of attic storey by T.L. Watson, 1881.

GALLOWAY COTTAGE, 41 Colquhoun Street / Milligs Street

?New cottage, c.1865

Unlikely attribution by Historic Scotland; larger house added to the east in 1877 by William Spence.

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HOLM OF BALFRON, Stirlingshire

see BALFRON

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HYDERABAD, Deccan, India

FALAKNUMA PALACE, see under OBJECTS: RAILINGS

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JOHNSTONE, Renfrewshire

EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF ST JOHN THE EVANGELIST, Floors Street

?New church, 1874

Gothic in style, and a most unlikely work by Thomson although drawings, now lost, apparently bore the office address 122 Wellington Street and an undated letter from R.S.N. Speir to the Bishop, now at the Glasgow City Archives, refers to “Mr Thomson the architect” The design was possibly by A.G. Thomson or by Turnbull but David Walker suggests David Thomson; enlarged with transepts and chancel 1878.

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KILCREGGAN, Dunbartonshire

also see COVE

ARDSLOY, Rosneath Road

New villa, 1851

Worsdall; McFadzean; Frank Arneil Walker with Fiona Sinclair, The North Clyde Estuary, RIAS Edinburgh 1992

Attribution undocumented but very likely.

CRAIG AILEY, see COVE

DUNVORLEIGH (CARRADALE), Rosneath Road

?New villa, 1850s

Originally called Carradale and similar to Thomson’s Seymour Lodge in Cove, q.v., but with entrance in centre; a mirror image of its neighbour Dunvronaig, q.v.

DUNVRONAIG (ELLERLY), Rosneath Road

?New villa, 1850s

Originally called Ellerly and similar to Seymour Lodge in Cove, q.v., but with entrance in centre; a mirror image of its neighbour Dunvorleigh, q.v.

GLENTRAE (SEATON LODGE), Rosneath Road

New villa, 1850s

Worsdall

Attribution undocumented but very likely, described by David Walker as a “very exceptional house;” originally called Seaton Lodge and similar to Ardsloy, q.v.

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KIRKINTILLOCH, Dunbartonshire

TURNBULL MONUMENT, AULD AISLE CEMETERY

?New grave monument, 1877

Adaptation of a Thomson design by Turnbull for his first wife, who died 22nd February 1877.

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LANGBANK, Renfrewshire

ELMHURST, off Station Road

†?New art gallery or music room, and a new lodge, for Thomas B. Seath, c.1864-73

Demolished along with house 1974

Extension with Ionic portico - columns & capitals of teak - used as an art gallery,. a music room and later as a badminton court. House called 'The Oaks' 1860-64, 'Sunny Oaks' 1864-1903 when owned by Thomas B. Seath, and 'Stron Vay' 1903-1950s. David Walker recalls that the details were similar to those at Busby House, q.v., and that there was a lodge with a steep central gable and a “T-divide window.”

WOODSIDE COTTAGES

New terrace of four houses, c.1855

McFadzean*

Houses in Gothic style similar to that of Seymour Lodge, Cove, q.v.; attribution on stylistic grounds. The APSD mentions villas at ‘Langband’ [sic] and David Walker recalls ‘Hazelwood’ of 1858 and ‘Ravenswood’ at Langbank.

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LENZIE, Dunbartonshire/Lanarkshire

UNION CHURCH, Kirkintilloch Road

‡Unexecuted design, for Lenzie United Presbyterian and Free Church congregations, 1874?

British Architect 19th February 1875*; Andrew Herron, Historical Directory to Glasgow Presbytery, Glasgow 1984 (typescript in Mitchell); Sam McKinstry in ATSN no.10 May 1994*

This design is mysterious as although it was published shortly before Thomson's death, it would seem to be an early work in its round-arched style and is similar to the design for unidentified Romanesque church in the Mitchell q.v. It has been suggested that it is an old design of Thomson's re-used by Turnbull, who was connected with Lenzie (and lived in Ruberslaw, 11 Heriot Road, a double-villa, 1875-86). The Lenzie congregations united in 1873 and the Union Church was built in 1874-75. A ‘Design for a Church at Lenzie’ by A. & G. Thomson & Turnbull was exhibited at the Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts in 1876.

BURNBANK TERRACE, GLENHEAD ROAD / 33-57 AUCHINLOCH ROAD

?New terrace of houses, 1870s

Unfinished long canted terrace with some Thomsonian details; attribution by Worsdall but unlikely.

GLENBANK TERRACE, 1-19 GLENBANK ROAD

?New terrace of 10 houses, for Murdoch & Rodger, solicitors of Glasgow, 1871-72

Don Martin, The Story of Lenzie, Strathkelvin District Libraries & Museum, 1989

Murdoch & Rodger initiated the development of Lenzie south of the station on the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway after 1870, making the village into a Glasgow commuter suburb. The title deeds of one house refer to "Alexander Thomson architect Glasgow" but this weak design exhibits none of the control and interest in dynamic repetition which characterise Thomson’s earlier terraces.

OLD SCHOOLHOUSE, 14-16 GLENBANK ROAD

?New double villa and school, for William Young, 1887

Maurice Lindsay, Scottish Field June 1977 p.39*; Sam McKinstry in ATSN no.10 May 1994.

Possibly by Turnbull re-using a design by Thomson as it is a fine, compact essay in the Rundbogenstil. The land originally feued for building houses in 1873 and the titles record that this plot was feued by the Church of Scotland to William Young in 1887 for erection of a double villa for occupation primarily, or for use as an educational establishment of superior character together with necessary offices attached." Known as Mr Young's Collegiate School until 1904 when sold and used as two private dwellings.

3-5 & 7-9 HERIOT ROAD

?New double villas, 1870s

Versions of Thomson’s much earlier published design for Seymour Lodge at Cove, q.v., and probably by his partner, Turnbull, who designed the double villa at 11-13 Heriot Road in 1875, lived in no.11 from 1875 until 1886, also designed 15 Heriot Road and seems to have been responsible for most of the houses in Lenzie which have Thomsonian details.

CRAIGARD & WARWICK CROFT, 43 ALEXANDRA ROAD / 10 HERIOT ROAD

New double-villa, c.1875?

Worsdall

The only villa in Lenzie which, despite alterations, looks as if it might be authentic Thomson. Another double-villa - Arden, 25 Victoria Road / Dalveen, 16 Glenhead Road - is similar but dated 1881 and may be an earlier Thomson design reworked by Turnbull.

OAKFIELD, 15 LINDSAYBEG ROAD

?New house, 1875

Worsdall

Drawings formerly at house bearing office address, 122 Wellington Street, and dated February 1875 so very likely by Turnbull; distinctive plasterwork internally.

REGENT SQUARE, 9 BEECHMOUNT ROAD, 1-11 REGENT SQUARE, 2-8 GLENBANK ROAD, 5 BEECHMOUNT ROAD

?New terraces of houses, for Murdoch & Rodger, solicitors of Glasgow, 1872-73

Don Martin, The Story of Lenzie, Strathkelvin District Libraries & Museum, 1989

An outward-facing ‘square,’ coarsely detailed; despite the connection with Murdoch & Rodger, most unlikely to be by Thomson.

INVERSHIEL, 27 VICTORIA ROAD

?New house, 1880-81

Maurice Lindsay, Scottish Field June 1977, p.39*

Symmetrical two-storey Thomsonian villa, with prominent attic, almost certainly by Turnbull rather than Thomson although its two-storey symmetrical elevation can be related to Ellisland in Nithsdale Road, Pollokshields, Glasgow, q.v.; drawings seen by Worsdall. Other Thomsonian houses in Lenzie include St Ronans, 6 Beech Road, and Hughenden, Margherite Avenue, but are probably by Turnbull, who made a successful career in Lenzie and elsewhere re-using the designs of his former partner but carefully eliminating any tautness or subtlety.

SHERBROOK, 34-36 VICTORIA ROAD

?New double-villa, 1871

A coarse and overscaled villa in Thomson’s early Romanesque manner, dated on the stonework. Possibly by Turnbull, except that he did not become Thomson’s partner until 1873.

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LONDON

ALBERT, PRINCE CONSORT MEMORIAL, HYDE PARK, Kensington

‡Unexecuted competition design, 1862

Large original perspective drawing (badly damaged) in GSA

Builder 4th April 1863; Gildard; Barclay*; Builder 31st December 1910*; Architects' & Builders' Journal 20th May 1914*; Survey of London vol.xxxv, The Museums Area of South Kensington and Westminster, London 1975 p.151; McFadzean*; Alexander Stoddart in S&McK*

Design for an obelisk-tower with a domed summit on a massive cruciform plinth, raised above monumental flights of steps. Gildard wrote that “the design for the London Prince Albert Memorial showed the colossal bulk with the sublimity of the Egyptic tempered by the subtle proportioning and the refining graces of the Greek.” This project is puzzling as Thomson was not among the nine architects invited to submit proposals for a Memorial to the Prince Consort in 1862 following the advice of Sir Charles Eastlake, PRA. However, Joseph Durham, James Fergusson and J.L. Hittorf are also known to have prepared designs.

Thomson's drawing was possibly a response to the initial proposal for a giant obelisk as a memorial approved by Queen Victoria but subsequently abandoned, the executed Gothic design by George Gilbert Scott eventually being chosen after competition. As he recorded in his Personal and Professional Recollections [1879, p.262], Scott had also,

“for my own personal satisfaction and pleasure, at the time when a monolithic obelisk, 150 feet high, was thought of, endeavoured to render that idea consistent with that of a christian monument. This I effected by adding to its apex, as is believed to have been done by the Egyptians, a capping of metal, that capping assuming the form of a large and magnificent cross... The faces of the obelisk I proposed to cover with incised subjects illustrative of the life, pursuits &c. of the Prince Consort. The obelisk was to have had a bold and massive base, at the angles of which were to be placed four granite lions, couchant, after the noble Egyptian model. The whole was to be raised on an elevated platform, approached by steps from all sides. I showed the drawing to the Queen, though not till after the idea of the obelisk had been finally abandoned.”

So had Scott seen Thomson’s drawing? Thomson's unidentified design for a Monumental Building, q.v., may relate to this project. Thomson exhibited a watercolour of a ‘Design for Memorial Building’ at the Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts in 1865 and (according to Henry-Russell Hitchcock) a design for the Albert Memorial at the Paris International Exhibition in 1867.

NATURAL HISTORY (SOUTH KENSINGTON) MUSEUM, CROMWELL ROAD, South Kensington

‡Unexecuted competition design, 1864

Perspective drawing in three parts in Mitchell; similar smaller perspective drawing owned by RIAS at RCAHMS.

Builder 14th May 1864, p. 347; Building News 22nd April 1864 p.298; Builder 11th May 1867; Gildard; Law*; Graham Law, ‘Colonnades and Temples: “Greek” Thomson’s Style,’ Glasgow Herald 8th June 1954; The Age of Neo-Classicism, Arts Council of Great Britain, London 1972; John Physick & Michael Darby, eds, Marble Halls, Victoria & Albert Museum, London 1973 p.198*; Survey of London vol.xxxv, The Museums Area of South Kensington and Westminster, London 1975 pp.203-205; McFadzean*; McKean*; S&McK*.

An entry under the motto 'Athenian' for what was called the South Kensington Museum competition, that is, for the Natural History Museum (A.G. Thomson, of Woodlands Road, Glasgow, also entered). This mismanaged competition was won by Francis Fowke but, in the event, Alfred Waterhouse was appointed architect for the Natural History Museum in 1866. Gildard thought that "... had it been built from Mr Thomson's designs, would have been the grandest Greek building in Europe." The Builder published a detailed description of the design, and thought it "has great merit of grouping in the masses... There is a fine effect in the design; though it had no chance of selection." The influence of Thomas Hamilton’s High School in Edinburgh, which Thomson considered one of the “two finest buildings in the kingdom,” is perhaps evident in the grouping of the raised temple masses.

This design is sometimes mistakenly assumed to be a scheme for the new buildings for Glasgow University on Gilmorehill, for which, notoriously, Thomson was not invited to compete and did not in fact make a design, contenting himself with attacking the Gothic Revival in general and George Gilbert Scott’s commissioned design in particular in the lecture he delivered in 1866. Thomson exhibited a drawing of a ‘Design for Natural History Museum, Kensington’ at the Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts in 1866 and again at the Architectural Exhibition at the premises of the Architectural Association in London in 1867 along with “several large frames of old office drawings” which were praised by William Burges as “certainly the best modern Greek architecture it has ever been my lot to see” (Builder 1st June 1867, p.387). The smaller of the perspective drawings of the South Kensington design was presented to the RIAS by Thomson's son John in 1932.

NEW CROSS ROAD, see GLASGOW: 84-100 UNION STREET

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MONTROSE, Forfarshire

HOTEL

?Alterations

Worsdall

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NEWTON MEARNS, Renfrewshire

CROYLAND (RYSLAND), 202 AYR ROAD

New villa, for John Shields, measurer, 1874

Amelia; Memorial; Worsdall; McFadzean*

Villa in Thomson’s mature style with a projecting bow window within a gable with curved panes of glass; originally called Rysland. The story that Thomson built this house for himself and that his family declined to move to so remote a spot from Glasgow is quite untrue; it was designed for his friend, the measurer John Shields, who had earlier been his neighbour at No.3 Moray Place, q.v., and became honorary treasurer and then secretary of the Alexander Thomson Memorial committee. This villa must be one of Thomson’s last personal executed works and a job which, clearly, he did not delegate to Turnbull or to assistants to develop and detail (as he did with the villas in Lenzie). The asymmetrical composition is austere but precisely balanced and detailed, and Ronald McFadzean considered that it contains “perhaps the best proportioned interior which Thomson designed for any of his villas.”

Owing to road widening in the 1970s, the front wall and two pairs of gate piers were re-erected nearer the house.

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PAISLEY, Renfrewshire

ABBEY CLOSE U.P. CHURCH

†?New doors and furnishings, for United Presbyterian congregation

Building demolished

Attribution by McFadzean on stylistic grounds; C.R. Mackintosh later designed a font for this church, built in 1827.

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ROTHESAY, ISLE OF BUTE

TOR HOUSE (UPPER CLIFTON VILLA)

see CRAIGMORE, ROTHESAY, ISLE OF BUTE

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RUTHERGLEN, Lanarkshire

9 HIGH STREET / 30-42 GLASGOW ROAD

?New block of tenements, 1877-81

Demolished c.1960

Walker

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STRATHAVEN, Lanarkshire

WINGFIELD, 78 KIRK STREET & 23 COMMERCIAL ROAD

?New double villa, 1878

Walker

Dating by Worsdall, who also referred to ‘Leaside’ 48 Townhead Street, Strathaven.

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UDDINGSTON, Lanarkshire

3 EDINBURGH ROAD & 15 EDINBURGH ROAD

?New villas, c.1879-82

Walker

Probably by Robert Thomson, who worked in this area; Worsdall dated Auldearn, 3 Edinburgh Road, to 1881-82.

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