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From Many Peoples' Strength Community Consultations were held in November, 2006 and February, 2007. Thank you to all participants for their ideas and participation. Here is a summary of the recommendations by the five focus groups: 

Mainstreaming multiculturalism themes:

Community, Education, Government

Growth and Development of First Nations and Métis Populations in relationship to multiculturalism priorities:

 

·         Better understanding of First Nations and Métis cultures

 

·         Increased engagement with multicultural communities

 

·         Enhanced economic opportunities

 

·         Improved relationships with other communities

 

·         Organizational development

 

 

Ethnocultural Arts priorities

·         Recognition, increased understanding and awareness

 

·         Increased involvement and participation

 

·         More opportunities and exposure

 

·         Education

 

·         Programming/Funding

 

 

Increased Immigration to Saskatchewan priorities:

 

·         Better understanding and awareness

 

·         Increased participation and involvement

 

·         Economic growth

 

·         Education

 

·         Advocacy

 

 

Youth vision key result areas:

 

·         Better understanding

 

·         Increased participation and involvement

 

·         Economic growth and advancement

 

·         Education

 

·         Understanding other cultures

 

 

SaskatchewanMulticulturalism Act priority:

 

·         Publicity and education to generate understanding, acceptance and improved practices

 

 

The consultations were presented by the SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Committee on Saturday, Feb. 10, 2007 at the German Canadian Concordia Club, 160 Cartwright St. E. Saskatoon. There was no Registration Fee. Everyone was welcome. There were a variety of speakers at the consultation. Their opinions do not necessarily reflect the positions of the committee or SaskCulture. This was an open forum for dialogue.

 

Comments from participants in the multicultural consultation Nov. 18 in Regina:

 

“ I found Leonzo Barreno’s talk on Interculturalism very stimulating. There is a lot of truth in his description that parallels my life.”

 

“Everyone was encouraged to contribute. This was a well planned and excellent day!”

 

 

“It was all good I learnt about the youth, how it is important for youth to get involved. I will spread the word to youth. I liked all of it.”

 

“It was a very good learning experience.”

 

“Very motivating,”

 

“Helped me learn and understand more.”

 

“I like the stories and there was lots of time for discussion. You all did very well. It couldn’t be better.”

 

READ THE SUCCESS STORIES FROM THE CONSULTATION PARTICIPANTS

9 am           Registration and Coffee. Black History Month vignettes were shown.

 

10 am        Opening Remarks and Greetings:

 

 

Dawn Martin Executive Director, Saskatchewan Culture Youth and Recreation

 

"It is my pleasure to bring greetings on behalf of Saskatchewan Culture, Youth and Recreation. Minister Glenn Hagel sends his regrets that he is unable to be here this morning. Minister Hagel was pleased to recommend the proclamation of February as Black History Month and I am pleased to see the acknowledgement of black history as part of today’s events. 

Saskatchewan people take a great deal of pride in the quality of life we enjoy in this province - a quality of life that is strongly supported by a rich, diverse cultural identity.

Saskatchewan people have long celebrated their cultural roots  -- indeed these roots are acknowledged in our provincial motto, “From many peoples, strength” – which I note is the theme of today’s meeting.    

Historically, multiculturalism came to mean the sharing of cultural traditions and cuisine – what we do at Folkfest.

But, we know that multiculturism is much more than sharing celebrations and symbols.

So …. What is multiculturalism?    

As a policy advisor with government, I am interested in hearing what you have to say today.

The issue of multiculturalism has taken on new life in our global village.  There are some important trends that will influence our thinking on the issue.

Canada’s reputation as a wealthy and tolerant society has made it a key destination for immigrants from around the world.

Saskatchewan’s Aboriginal population is growing faster than in any other jurisdiction in Canada.

Canada’s labour force is no longer replacing itself.  We are looking to address this issue by increasing immigration and by recruiting more Aboriginal people into the workforce. 

World events have raised media and public suspicions about those who appear to be from “somewhere else” and, in many western countries, tolerance for diversity is in the decline.

Many countries, in the Western world in particular, are rethinking their ideals of multiculturalism.

We are beginning to see a distinction between citizenship and nationality. 

By way of example, just the other day, I heard a story on the CBC national news about a plot in the middle east where three individuals had been arrested.  Two were Syrian and one was “an Egyptian with Canadian citizenship”. 

I was quite struck by the use of language.  I’m not sure even Maher Arar was described as a Syrian with Canadian Citizenship – this is quite new.

The impact of this distinction is as yet unknown – although there is some research linking national identity based more strongly in location (citizenship) than in ethnicity (nationality) with a more harmonious and integrated society. 

At the same time, pride in ethnicity is one of the mechanisms that we have long promoted as a means of countering racism – Black History Month is an example.

The trends I’ve outlined aside, Canada remains a world wide success story in multiculturalism." 

 

His Worship Mayor Don Atchison, City of Saskatoon

Saskatoon is known as the City of Bridges but this is reflective of more than landmarks, said Mayor Don Atchison at the multicultural community consultation Feb. 10. "Saskatoon is a city that actually bridges people together."

Diversity and inclusivity are key to the city's economic and social development.

"Here in Saskatoon we want to make a difference for everyone."

Mayor Atchison was born and raised in Saskatoon. He attained a strong business background through his years as owner/operator of a successful men's clothing store in downtown Saskatoon. He is also an avid sportsman, having participated in curling, tennis, football, golf and hockey as a professional player and coach for many years.

Revitalizing communities is a key strategy for Saskatoon and Atchison said much like in sports team spirit needs to be prioritized. "If everyone feels part of the process it will be so much more successful."

The mayor thanked all the delegates at the consultation and said Saskatoon was the volunteer capital of Canada.

"You truly do make Saskatoon shine along with the province of Saskatchewan," he said.

 

Herman Slotsve, President of SaskCulture

"Good morning and thank you Mayor Atchison for your remarks.  On behalf of the SaskCulture Board of Directors, I am pleased to be here, along with many representatives from Saskatchewan’s cultural community, to take part in today’s multicultural consultation.

 

As you may know, SaskCulture’s vision is to build a culturally-vibrant Saskatchewan. This is a province that not only has a strong, cohesive cultural community, but one whose people value, support and have access to a diversity of cultural activity. 

 

SaskCulture  was established back in 1997 to work towards a common vision and unite the Saskatchewan’s diverse cultural community- of the arts, heritage, cultural industries and multiculturalism - and provide opportunities where people, from cultural groups, agencies and organizations, could come together to exchange ideas, learn from one another and develop cultural experiences for the people of this province.  As well, Saskculture’s new constitution also recognized that it was essential for the organization to be inclusive of Saskatchewan’s First Nations and Métis peoples.

 

From Many People’s Strength is a fitting theme for this, and any forum held in the cultural community, because it is from the strength, support and ideas of many Saskatchewan people, including leaders, volunteers, staff members, governments, partners, that we continue to move forward in building a culturally-vibrant province.

 

To continue the progress, SaskCulture, along with the cultural community, have worked to find different ways of reaching out to Saskatchewan’s diverse population and collecting input on this culturally-vibrant future.  The development of communities of interest for multiculturalism, arts, heritage, cultural industries, as well as the advisory circle for the First Nations and Métis peoples’ cultural interests has become instrumental in helping SaskCulture stay connected to the needs of Saskatchewan people and shaping programs and services to address these needs.  Thanks to support of Saskatchewan Lotteries Trust Fund for Sport, Culture and Recreation, we are able to support events like this where we can all learn from each other.

 

We are pleased that the Multicultural Community of Interest Committee, which in itself brings together a diverse group of cultural organizations, is able to bring together many individuals from Saskatchewan’s unique multicultural community and gather input that will help strengthen the interests of multiculturalism in this province.

 

Once again I thank you for being here today.  Your input will contribute to a culturally-vibrant Saskatchewan because as you know Culture Builds Community!” 

 

Bruno Kossmann, Chair of the SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Committee

"I would like to welcome everyone to the community consultation on behalf of the SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Committee. The committee has been meeting since 2004. Our role is to provide an opportunity for public dialogue about multiculturalism, foster understanding, promote inclusion, and advise SaskCulture about multicultural policies and issues. Our first activity was to develop a definition of multiculturalism for SaskCulture, then we developed a strategic plan for our committee. Our goals are to revitalize leadership, advocate, initiate dialogue, work in unison for a common purpose and ensure accessibility of funding for multicultural needs. In 2006, we worked to describe the benefits of multiculturalism. I invite you browse our website for more information, to read the definition of multiculturalism we developed, view and comment on the benefits statements, to enter our Blog or to join on our database.  

I would like to acknowledge the committee members. I also want to recognize the staff of provincial cultural organizations that have supported the committee. And I would like to acknowledge the committee Secretariat, the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan. Thank you again for joining us today in this open discussion of future directions for multiculturalism. You may wonder: Why is the Committee hosting community consultations?

The committee is engaging the general public in the process of planning future directions for multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. This will help build a culturally vibrant province where all citizens celebrate, value and participate in a rich cultural life and build increased appreciation and respect for cultural diversity. The committee is trying to inspire interest in multiculturalism and identify key issues of the people of Saskatchewan. 

We hosted a community consultation in Regina Nov. 18 in commemoration of Saskatchewan Multicultural Week. About 100 people attended that forum. We received a tremendous volume of information. Thanks to all the participants for providing success stories, which were posted to the website, and sharing ideas for future directions of multiculturalism. It is going to take us some time to analyze all the data, but we hope to identify some common themes. 

The consultation promoted the value of diversity in Saskatchewan and brought together the broader multicultural community for dialogue and discussion and encouraged all individuals and organizations interested in the broad spectrum of multiculturalism in Saskatchewanto participate in opportunities for dialogue.

 

We are looking forward to hearing from the participants today. This morning we will hear from many great speakers and this afternoon we will be able to share our ideas and suggestions with others. I thank you all in advance for listening respectfully with open minds and for participating in this opportunity for dialogue. We welcome your suggestions and thank you all for joining us today in honour of the Saskatchewan motto: From Many Peoples’ Strength. During Black History Month, we reflect on and pay tribute to the history of the African-Canadian community in Saskatchewan and the many contributions individuals and organizations have made to our development. In March, we will commemorate the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. We hope that the spirit of this campaign lasts throughout the year."

 

10:20 am  Keynote Address

 

Dr. Joseph Garcea, University of Saskatchewan

 

"Evolving Multiculturalism Policies, Programs and  Discourses in  Saskatchewan"

 

Dr. Joseph Garcea is an associate professor in the department of Political Studies at the University of Saskatchewan where he teaches courses in public policy analysis, public management, public-private partnerships, federalism, and intergovernmental relations.

 

He is leader of the 'citizenship research domain' for the Prairie Centre of Excellence on Immigration and Integration and an affiliate of the Canadian Immigrant Observatory in Low Immigrant-Populated Areas.

 

His areas of research and publications include immigration, citizenship, and multiculturalism policy. Prof. Garcea has extensive experience in conducting and co-ordinating research initiatives within these policy areas. He has written an article on the evolution of provincial multiculturalism policies. He has co-authored a report titled "Building Saskatoon to Become a Global City: A Framework for an Immigration Action Plan."

 

Current research projects include: Canadian multiculturalism discourse(s); Citizenship education for adult immigrants; Immigration and ethnic relations in three Saskatchewan communities.

 

10:40 am   Questions

 

11:00 am   Panel Presentation

 

Panelists included:

 

Alexandra Popoff who teaches Russian in a heritage language school in Saskatoon.

"Teaching Russian in elementary schools, as part of SOHL mini language program, is a rewarding experience. My students are engaged and look forward to the lessons.

 

Children have a natural ability for learning languages: their minds are flexible and so are their tongues. They are curious about new things. It’s important to learn languages at a young age, the sooner the better.

 

We live in a changing world. In the past, major European languages were mandatory to students. With Arabic and Mandarin becoming world languages, we are facing a new reality. This generation of Canadian students will have a greater variety of languages to choose from.

 

Exposing students to diversity and multiculturalism will help them adjust to the demands of the changing world. Mini language lessons provide students with eight hours of learning different languages and cultures, beginning with alphabet, folk tales, and ending with a virtual tour through major world cities. The lessons could generate interest in travel, business, and international affairs.

 

The program, launched by the Saskatchewan Organization for Heritage Languages, has been running for more than 10 years. Although students, parents, and teachers are enthusiastic about the program, it’s known mostly in Saskatoon and Regina. Some requests from elementary schools are denied because of insufficient funding. In fact, the program, which promotes diversity and multiculturalism among students, is chronically underfunded. Our goal is to take the program across Saskatchewan. We hope to create greater public awareness and attain sufficient funding."

 

Shirley Isbister, who disucussed the Metis Cultural Education Program.

 

Christiane Guerette, elected deputy representative for Saskatoon of the Assemblee communautaire fransaskoise(ACF), discussed increased immigration to Saskatchewan. She outlined new practices, synergy, interdependence and the commission on inclusion in the fransaskois community: from minority to citizenship. She also discussed wholistic and sustainable community development.

 

Mesdames et Messieurs, Friends of culture, friends of womens, friend of multiculturalism,

 

Bonjour, Hi, Guten Tag, Tansi, Buenos Dias...

 

It is a great pleasure today to greet you in your language and , of course, in mine.  This introduction is an accurate reflection of the vision that the Fransaskois community recently developed for multiculturalism and immigration, a vision that can be summarized as an openness to others without losing one's own identity.

 

Not so long ago, out of fear of losing our language and our culture, and out of fear of being assimilated, Francophones were rather withdrawn and showed little openness to others in our schools, in our churches, during our activities.  What is the difference today?  Well, the adoption of a new vision, the development of a collective awareness of the richness that "others" bring, as well as the realization that the Fransaskois community no longer has to hide, since it has a lot to offer Canadian society and Saskatchewan society.

 

Francophones in Saskatchewan are facing significant demographic challenges and we need a vision of the future for the viable renewal of our community.

 

We therefore established the Commission on Inclusion in the Fransaskois Community, a joint academic and community partnership.  An extensive consultation was held to capture the opinions of community members, organizations and institutions on cultural diversity and the balance that needs tobe maintained between exclusion and inclusion.  The Commission's report, entitled From Minority to Citizenship, made 24 recommendations.

 

Now, if you ask me how increased immigration will affect multiculturalism, I will answer that the Fransaskois have chosen respect and openness.  They are aware that, as a group, cultural communities have synergy and can work together to create more opportunities for all citizens in Saskatchewan.  Multiculturalism could take this direction, uniting communities around this concept, so that everyone benefits.

 

In more concrete terms, the Fransaskois community has beautiful vision:making learning another language compulsory in the educational system.  By joining together, community representatives will succeed in bringing added value to Saskatchewan, value that will be unique for our future generations.  In additiona to English, our youth could learn Michif, Spanish, Cree, French.  this is another means of preserving our culture.  If one community were to speak to the government of this initiative, it would have less influence than if all the communities joined together.  I therefore invite you today to join us!

 

The development of immigraiton could therefore be truly positive.  To accomplish this, we need to unite and make those around us, whatever their culture, aware of this.  I hope that Saskatchewan will become, for us and for our future newcomers, the greatest place around to live.  One of our most important challenges is therefore to increase our capacity to welcome and integrate newcomers to increase retention.

 

In conclusion, bringing cultural communities together and successfully integrating immigrants will lead to social change, community development and a global and sustainable society.  With this in mind, the Fransaskois community has chosen to include others while conserving its specificity.  You will see... once we are all gathered together, 1 plus 1 will not only equal 2, but will mean infinite possibilities.  That is what we call synergy.

 

Thank you everyone for listening to me today, hope you will work together to built a better future!

 

Victoria Morris discussed the Youth Action Now blue print for action.  Victoria is a passionate advocate for youth involvement and leadership in organizations and communities. Currently working as program officer with the Saskatchewan Co-operative Association, she co-ordinates a successful series of co-operative education seminars for teens, along with co-operative education courses for boards and staff of co-ops and credit unions. She co-ordinated Youth Action Now, a three year, Saskatchewan-wide multicultural youth project, and highlighted some of the recommendations and results from the 2,000 young people that participated in the project.

 

"Throughout 2004 and 2005, Youth Action Now consulted 2,000 young people across the province about their vision for the future of multiculturalism in Saskatchewan. The hundreds and hundreds of ideas of these 2,000 youth were compiled into recommendations in the YAN Blueprint for Action.

 

What were the recommendation themes?

•         Multiculturalism integrated into education

•         Multiculturally enhanced communities

•         Multiculturally engaged youth

•         Youth in multicultural dialogue

•         Youth’s voice in multiculturalism

•         Expanded multicultural programming in mainstream media

•         Multiculturalism makes cents

 

Who were the recommendations for?

•         Government, all levels

•         Ethno-cultural and multicultural orgs

•         Youth

•         Media

•         Business

The recommendations included some for immediate action, 1-2 years, five year outcomes, as well as overarching recommendations

 

So, what has happened since YAN with…

 •         Government

 •         Schools

 •         UCC-SPC and MCoS

 

The Youth Volunteers – Youth Advisory Committee and school workshop Facilitators

 

SK Learning- Interested and working on implementing some of the recommendations, including a multicultural lens/filters to curriculum reviews, increasing accessibility for youth to languages/language classes

 

Many of the schools where youth forums were held continue to see the effects of YAN….

 •         Carpenter High, in Meadow Lake is still doing annual multicultural days/festival at their school

 

 •         Lipton High is also continuing to organize annual multicultural activities

  

•         Churchill Composite in La Ronge has continued to place emphasis on highlighting cultural activities for students, as well as sending students to events and organizing their own events

 

•         Mount Royal Collegiate in Saskatoon continues to support a First Nations student dance troupe and is also working to enhance their support of their ESL programming

 •         UCC-SPC is still interested in continuing to work on enhancing the results/work done through YAN, and working on multicultural issues in SK

 

 •         MCoS continues their emphasis on multicultural activities, and   demonstrating youth leadership with their activities

 

 •         A U of R Faculty of Education professor is incorporating some of the  ideas in the YAN report into her course curriculum

 

 •         One of the projects we partnered with - Ukrainian dancing in a    community school in Saskatoon - was wildly popular among students and  teachers, so work is being done to continue a partnership with    community schools to deliver ethno- and multi-cultural activities.

 

Awareness and Attitudes

Adventures and opportunities of the youth volunteers

 

•         In 2006, Margarita attended a youth conference RESOLVE IT! Also, she completed a Canadian part of Canada World Youth exchange to Indonesia

 

•         Mina and Naima and Gabby (and I'm sure others as well) have gone to   multicultural events

 

•         Calista… indirectly, it's been amazingly valuable for my career(s) - both   professional and volunteer.

 

 •         Gabby attended the Youth conference Resolve it! on conflict resolution    put on by YOUCAN, she went to that with margarita! also this summer   she went to Quebec for 5 weeks as part of the french immersion     program 'J'explore'

 

•         Hope is taking part in a Canada World Youth Exchange

 

David:

I'm now in the UofA Medicine program, living in the residence called 'International House' - must have been my multicultural background that let me in.

I'm continuing the Economics Flag project here in Edmonton while ACE Saskatchewan is doing it back in Saskatoon. I'm making the game bigger and better, involving international students here in iHouse, as well as partnering with a social justice group here known as Eonfire and SIFE Alberta.

 

I'm also starting a group here (partnered with Global Education at the International Center at the UofA) called the ‘Global Education Special Service’ which will bring, well, global education to the masses. The aforementioned Economics Flag project will be one of the first run under the GESS banner.

 

Krupal:

I am actually currently sitting on the Allocations Panel of United Way where we visit agencies, evaluate them (their programs and wherever they use United Way funding) and recommend the funding they receive from United Way to the United Way Board. I started this January and will finish in March. There are about 7 different panels and I am on a panel with 3 other people. We are visiting 4 agencies: Catholic Family Services, Canadian Mental Health, YWCA and Sask. Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services.

 

It is not directly related to YAN, however it definitely utilizes some of skills that I learned and refined while involved in YAN. Additionally, I think I am only one of the two Univ. Students involved in it. Other than that I am just busy with school.

 

Ashley:

Since YAN I have stayed involved with the National Association of Friendship Centres. I help in the aboriginal community. Though I am more conscious to not be racist against other cultures but embrace our differences.

Being apart of YAN opened my eyes to other cultures in Saskatchewan. I would like to see more provincial initiatives involving youth and multiculturalisim.

I had a baby he is 9 months old named Dontae Bear, he is a Plains Cree First Nations from Ochapowace First Nation.

I also got on the Provincial Youth Advisory Committee, for those who do not know that this is, it is a NDP Provincial Gov. Youth Committee, all on this committee are appointed by the Minister of Culture, Youth and Recreation. So it is pretty big and fun. I always stress the importance of how we need to share and not be ignorant of each other and our cultures. As I know that a lot of racism still exists today.

Being an Aboriginal person, has opened my eyes to having racism thrown at me. YAN has helped me to be proud to be a person from a strong culture. I was always interested in other cultures, but I want to see more YAN PROJECTS.......

 

Lorin:

I too learned a lot of other cultures and also a lot about myself. I was actually afraid or felt i didn’t belong when I first met with members of YAN. Growing up (to put it mildly) under-privileged, one thinks they are not worthy to be associated with other people especially such bright, talented people as the YAN members.

Anyway, interacting and learning of other cultural backgrounds made me realize that I too was somebody. I got a real boost of confidence from YAN. Since the YAN experience I have gone places and done things that I never would have dreamed I'd do in a life time. The last European trip I took I traveled with Dance SK. and performed not only with First Nation dancers but other contemporary dancers of various ethnic backgrounds.

One day we were all gathered on a beach in Holland with the contemporary dancers on one side and the First Nation dancers on the other, divided as we have been for many years. Not thinking anything I kicked the ball up as high as I could on the beach and a gust of wind carried the ball to the contemporary dancers. I stood there watching as the two different types of dancers began kicking the ball to each other then slowly came together to have a huge volleyball game on the beach. We broke down a huge racial barrier right then and there.  My friend stood by me and said you're awesome. Look at what you managed to do. I said I didn’t do a damn thing but kick a ball in the air. There was a reason that gust of wind came when it did. I then realized I have been forgetting to acknowledge and pay respect to all the elements of mother nature, including the wind.

We went over to Europe as Dance SK. the Native dancers and contemporary dancers. But we came back as just Dance SK. Good solid friendships were created on that trip and a new understanding and respect for all other ethnic backgrounds. I was the co-choreographer of the piece we performed over there. I strongly believe that organizations and gatherings that YAN offered helped me too to open up and realize more of my self and my potential. That's just one of the stories of the trip."

 

Dennis and Melanie Jackson shared the success story of Wapos Bay, a unique non-stop motion claymation series aimed at family audiences. The Dark Thunder Production airs on Aboriginal Peoples Television Network and follows the adventures of three children as they explore their remote northern community of Wapos Bay. Wapos Bay won the Canada Award at the Geminis. Created and sponsored by the Multiculturalism Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Canada Award honours excellence in mainstream television programming that reflects the cultural diversity of Canada. It aims to promote greater opportunities for ethnic and visible minority professionals within the broadcasting industry on both sides of the camera. Dark Thunder Productions in based in Saskatoon.

 

Dr. Brian McKinstry, discussed Saskatchewan's groundbreaking success in developing Multicultural Legislation.

 

The Achievements of Saskatchewan's Multicultural Legislation 

 

We can speak about multiculturalism in two broad ways:

 

1) as a social fact, as the demographic and cultural reality of our province.

We all have our own personal knowledge and experience with the multicultural reality in Saskatchewan.  For example, I have a lot of experience with the Saskatchewan German Council and also I have some experience at teaching German as the U of S.  Others here today are knowledgeable in other aspects of multiculturalism, suchas immigration settlement or anti-racism programming.  Each of us, in our respective multicultural roles, although we are experts in our individual areas are, nevertheless somewhat restricted in our understanding of the larger picture, on the entire multi-layered phenomenon we call multiculturalism.

 

To break through the restrictions of specializaiton and personal experience, it may be helpful to step back and gain some distance, and a broader perspective, by talking about multiculturalism.

 

2) as social policy of government that attempts to define multiculturalism by means of legislation.

In this room today there are probably as many understandings of multiculturalism as there are people present.  At the same time, a working knowledge, or even a passing familiarity of what government considers multiculturalism, is probably the exception, and most likely rare.

As a result or our narrow personal experience on the one hand, and our lack of knowledge of the government's official version of multiculturalism on the other, we can easily find ourselves speaking at cross purposes about multiculturalism, or in well-meaning generalities that are not specific enough to be useful.

 

We should, I suggest, use the government's vocabulary to speak about multiculturalism.  In this manner we can develop a common and precise language to use among ourselves, and to use with legislators including the Minister of Multiculturalism, who according to the Act, has six separates powers to help implement multi in the province.

 

Should we, as active multiculturalisms be familiar with these powers, so that we can call upon the Minister's assistance when appropriate or necessary?  Shouldn't  we also familiar with the 10 policy clauses of the Act, as well as its three stated purposes, so that we can point out the specific areas where we are seeking assistance and the reasons why?

 

Or should we take the position that the Act is too distant from reality, the Minister too far removed for us to approach, the policy clauses so loaded with jargon as to have no practical application?

 

My answer to that question is: Come to my worshop and let's examine the Act with a view toward finding out where it's working, where it's not working, where things are moving sideways and how things could work better.  During the workshops I will show how it is easy to group the policy clauses into four areas of multiculturalism:

1) ethnic identity

2) interculturlasm

3) social equity issues, and

4) immigration

 

We will also look at what the Minister can do to help us achieve our goals.

 

In my view the Multiculturalism Act of Saskatchewan (1997) is an achievement in legislation that has shaped, and is shaping our province.  In my opinion, the Act is a goundbreaking accomplishment in social legislation.

 

Here are some reasons why I say that:

 

1) Saskatchewan was the first province to adopt legislation on multiculturalism in 1974.  This original act narrowly defined multi as the right of different communities to preserve their distinct cultures and to share them with others.  The old Act of 74 also enabled government to make grants directly for multiculturalism.

 

2) The new Saskatchewan Multiculturalism Act of 1997 broadened the concept of multiculturalism to include not only the development of identities of ethnic groups, but also issues of anti racism, equity, harmonious relations among people of diverse ethnic backgrounds (interculturalism) and the welcoming and settlement of immigrants.

 

3) The new act provides a direct link to the statutory basis of Canada including:

- the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights

- Canadian Bill of Rights

- Human Rights Act of 1977

 

Canada and Saskatchewan's multicultural policy flows from the values expressed in the Charter, in other Canadian laws, and in international agreements that Canada has committed to.

 

4) It is important to note that the Saskatchewan government by no means change the Act in 1977 in a unilateral manner.  On the contrary, these changes were  developed by several key committees made of members of the multicultural community itself.  In other words, the current Multiculturalism Act belongs orginally to this community, not to some group of lawyers working  in a remote wing of the Legislative Building.  The Act is ours, and we should use it to benefit not only our community, but every community in the province.

 

5) I can say this with confidence because the new act is inclusive.  Because everyone has a cultural background, everyone is included.  Aborignals, French Canadians, English Canadians and all other important ethnic communities of the province, regardless of size are all included - we are all included.  No one stands outside multiculturalism.  It is interesting to note that Aboriginal cultures taken together are the only culture to be expressly named in the Act.  The founding cultures to Canada, English and French, as well as the larger minority cultures in Saskatchewan, are not explicity named.

 

6)  The Multicultural Act rejects the idea that cultural variety should be kept at a minimum.  The idea behind encouraging separate ethnic identities has been referred to as teh "Multicultural Assumption", and this is a belief that confidence and pride in one's own identity will lead to tolerance and appreciation of people with other identities.  Seen in this light, the Multiculturalism Act is an attempt by government, supported, inspired by the broad community, to create social conditions most conducive to a harmonious and productive way of life.

 

To me, this attemp is an achievement.  It is something that we, as multiculturalists, should understand, build upon, respect and make use of.

 

Thank you.

 

12 pm   Lunch

             (Lemon Herb Chicken Breasts, Oven Roast Potatoes, Fruit and Cheese, Tossed Salad, Pasta Salad)

 

1pm      Focus Group Discussions

 

  • Focus Group One: Past, Present and Future: Mainstreaming Multiculturalism and addressing the aging population and its effect on multicultural activities. In this focus group, facilitated by Bruno Kossmann, you will share your vision for Saskatchewan and what you would like the general public, community of interest committee and provincial government to achieve. The benefits of those goals and barriers will also be discussed.                Focus Questions: Describe your vision for multiculturalism in Saskatchewan for the next three years. What do you want the general public, such as students, teachers, cultural groups, businesses, sport, recreation and community groups to achieve? What do you want the SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Commiteee to achieve? What do you want the provincial government to achieve?Develop two Shared Recommendations. What would successful achievement of your recommendations provide for: you, your family, your community, your organiztion? What barriers are preventing successful achievement of these  recommendations locally and provincially? What advice do you have for successful achievement of these recommendations? What are two things you can do to advance multiculturalism?

 

  • Focus Group 2: The Growth and Development of First Nations and Metis populations in relationship to multiculturalism. In this focus group, facilitated by Germaine Neapetung, you will share what you would like the general public, community of interest committee and provincial government to achieve with regards to the growth and development of the First Nations and Metis Community in relationship to multiculturalism. The benefits of those goals and barriers will also be discussed. Focus Questions: Describe your vision for First Nations and Metis populations in relationship to multiculturalism in Saskatchewan for the next three years. What do you want the general public, such as students, teachers, cultural groups, businesses, sport, recreation and community groups to achieve? What do you want the SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Commiteee to achieve? What do you want the provincial government to achieve?Develop two Shared Recommendations. What would successful achievement of your recommendations provide for: you, your family, your community, your organiztion? What barriers are preventing successful achievement of these  recommendations locally and provincially? What advice do you have for successful achievement of these recommendations? What are two things you can do to advance multiculturalism?

 

  • Focus Group 3: Increased immigration to Saskatchewan and the effects on multiculturalism. In this focus group, facilitated by Darlene Stakiw, you will share what you would like the general public, community of interest committee and provincial government to achieve with regards to the increased immigration to Saskatchewan. The benefits of those goals and barriers will also be discussed.                 Focus Questions: Describe your vision for immigration in Saskatchewan for the next three years. What do you want the general public, such as students, teachers, cultural groups, businesses, sport, recreation and community groups to achieve? What do you want the SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Commiteee to achieve? What do you want the provincial government to achieve?Develop two Shared Recommendations. What would successful achievement of your recommendations provide for: you, your family, your community, your organiztion? What barriers are preventing successful achievement of these  recommendations locally and provincially? What advice do you have for successful achievement of these recommendations? What are two things you can do to advance multiculturalism?

 

  • Focus Group 4: Youth vision versus traditional approaches and new developments in the ethnocultural arts. In this focus group, facilitated by Reggie Newkirk, you will share what you would like the general public, community of interest committee and provincial government to achieve with regards to youth vision or the ethnocultural arts. The benefits of those goals and barriers will also be discussed                 Focus Questions: Describe your vision for youth or the ethnocultural arts in Saskatchewan for the next three years. What do you want the general public, such as students, teachers, cultural groups, businesses, sport, recreation and community groups to achieve? What do you want the SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Commiteee to achieve? What do you want the provincial government to achieve?Develop two Shared Recommendations. What would successful achievement of your recommendations provide for: you, your family, your community, your organiztion? What barriers are preventing successful achievement of these  recommendations locally and provincially? What advice do you have for successful achievement of these recommendations? What are two things you can do to advance multiculturalism?

 

  • Workshop: Multicultural Legislation in Saskatchewan facilitated by Dr. Brian McKinstry. In this workshop, facilitated by Dr. Brian McKinstry, you will examine the wording of the The Multiculturalism Act of Saskatchewan (1997) and discuss its intent and implementation. 

 

2:45 pm    Break

 

3:00 pm    Reporting Back

 

3:45 pm    Closing Remarks and Next Steps

 

4:00 pm    Reporting Back

 

4:45 pm    Closing Remarks and Next Steps

 

5:00 pm    Adjournment

 

 

What happened in Regina at the community consultation?

 

Almost 100 people joined in an open discussion about future directions of multiculturalism in Saskatchewan Saturday Nov. 18 in Regina at the Travelodge South! The input will help develop recommendations in areas of immigration, inclusion, mainstreaming multiculturalism and youth vision. There was no registration fee. Everyone was welcome. The event celebrated Saskatchewan Multicultural Week. Delegates were from Regina, Yorkton, Weyburn, Cowessess, Whitefox, Lumsden, Lloydminster, Prince Albert and Esterhazy. Here is the agenda as well as photos and speeches from the Regina event. There were a variety of speakers at the consultation and their opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the committee or SaskCulture. This was an open forum for dialogue.

 

10:00        Welcome to the Community Consultation:

                    Master of Ceremonies Dr. Jawahar (Jay) Kalra,

                    President, Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan 

 

"Today's consultations are named in honour of the Saskatchewan motto: From Many Peoples' Strength. Saskatchewan was the first province to enact multiculturalism legislation in 1974, recognizing the right of every community to retain its identity, language and traditional arts and sciences for the mutual benefit of its citizens. In 1997, the Act was revised and a section of the Act states the policy should preserve, strengthen and promot Aboriginal cultures and acknowledge their historic and current contribution to the development of Saskatchewan. We ask you all to review and reflect on the legislation in commemoration of multicultural week."

http://www.publications.gov.sk.ca/details.cfm?p=636

 

 

MULTICULTURAL COMMUNITY CONSULTATIONS -

(L-R) Dr. Jay Kalra, Master of Ceremonies, Elder Norma Jean Byrd, Deputy Minister Barbara MacLean, Saskatchewan Culture, Youth and Recreation, Councillor Louis Browne, City of Regina Ward One, Herman Slotsve, President, SaskCulture.

 

Greetings:

Barbara MacLean, Deputy Minister

Saskatchewan Culture, Youth and Recreation

 

"Saskatchewan people take a great deal of pride in the quality of life we enjoy in this province - a quality of life that is strongly supported by a rich, diverse cultural identity.

 

Saskatchewan people celebrate their cultural roots by sharing their heritage, music, dance, art, cuisine and customs with others. Multiculturalism, however, doesn't stop at celebrations. It is a way of life.

 

In today's world the relationship between culture and geography is changing. People are increasingly mobile and move across international borders. With this mobility comes challenges. Multiculturalism is seen by some, as challenging their way of life. In some countries, multiculturalism, or diversity or differences, are seen as threats. You cannot pick up a paper or a news magazine today without reading an article about these tensions.

 

We would like to think that this is not the case in our province or our country. Canada continues to be regarded internationally as a success story for multiculturalism and Saskatchewan has pioneered a variety of policies and legislative tools. This success serves as a strong foundation but in no way means our work is complete in the area.

 

We need to continue to demonstrate our leadership and innovation in legislation, in culturally-sensitive justice models, in programs and policies that support inclusion, and, in community driven multicultural activity.

 

Today, you have the opportunity to influence the future of multiculturalism in our province as we discuss not just how diverse cultural groups can co-exist, but how meaningful connections and relationships can be built.

 

On behalf of the Province of Saskatchewan, I would like to thank the SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Committee and the Multicultural Council of Saskatchewan for organizing today's consultations. I would also like to thank each of you, the participants. Your involvement is essential as we continue to create awareness and ensure that our neighbours, friends and family fully appreciate the richness that multiculturalism brings into our lives."

 

Bruno Kossmann, Chair

SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Committee

 

"I would like to welcome everyone to the community consultation on behalf of the SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Committee. We are volunteers that have been meeting since 2004. Our role is to provide an opportunity for public dialogue about multiculturalism, foster understanding, promote inclusion, and advise SaskCulture about multicultural policies and issues. Our first activity was to develop a definition of multiculturalism for SaskCulture, then we developed a strategic plan for our committee. In 2006 we worked to describe the benefits of multiculturalism. I invite you to visit our website for more information, to read the definition of multiculturalism we developed, view and comment on the benefits statements, to enter our Blog or join on our database."

The committee members were introduced.

 

10:15 am           Keynote Address: Leonzo Barreno

"Moving Beyond Multiculturalism to Interculturalism in Saskatchewan."

 

 

Leonzo Barreno is the co-ordinator of the Intercultural Leadership Project, Indigenous Peoples Program, University of Saskatchewan. He is training First Nations and Metis youth as well as new young immigrants on interculturalism: moving beyond recognizing cultures to interacting with mutual trust, mutual acknowledgement, effective communication, dialogue and debate, exchange of knowledge and experiences, peaceful resolution of conflicts, co-operation and peaceful co-existence to enjoy the benefits of a shared development in a geographic area we all now share. See biography below.

 

10:45 am           Panel Presentation on the four focus areas and the sharing of success stories:

 

  • Focus Group One: Past, Present and Future: Mainstreaming Multiculturalism and addressing the aging population and its effect on multicultural activities.In this focus group, facilitated by Bruno Kossmann, you will share your vision for Saskatchewan and what you would like the general public, community of interest committee and provincial government to achieve. The benefits of those goals and barriers will also be discussed.

 

  • Focus Group 2: The Growth and Development of First Nations and Metis populations in relationship to multiculturalism. In this focus group, facilitated by Germanine Neapetung, you will share what you would like the general public, community of interest committee and provincial government to achieve with regards to the growth and development of the First Nations and Metis Community in relationship to multiculturalism. The benefits of those goals and barriers will also be discussed.

 

  • Focus Group 3: Increased immigration to Saskatchewan and the effects on multiculturalism. In this focus group, facilitated by Darlene Stakiw, you will share what you would like the general public, community of interest committee and provincial government to achieve with regards to the increased immigration to Saskatchewan. The benefits of those goals and barriers will also be discussed.

 

  • Focus Group 4: Youth vision versus traditional approaches and new developments in the ethnocultural arts. In this focus group, facilitated by Reggie Newkirk, you will share what you would like the general public, community of interest committee and provincial government to achieve with regards to the youth vision for multiculturalism and the ethnoculatural arts. The benefits of those goals and barriers will also be discussed.

 

Panelists Included:

 

(L-R) Rhonda Rosenberg, Cassidy McFadzean and Risa Naytowhow of ACT!   an anti-racism, cross cultural team building program of Regina Public Schools with an emphasis on student leadership. They will share the success of this project as an example of mainstreaming multiculturalism and addressing the aging population and its effect on multicultural activities.

 

 

Panelists (L-R)

Milton Tootoosis, Diversity Advisor for SaskPower, is passionate about Aboriginal cultural awareness for the next wave of leaders. He thoroughly enjoys sharing his personal experiences and insights on the subject with a variety of organizations in their quest for inclusion and respect.

Mr. Tootoosis is of Cree and Nakoda descent from the Treaty Six Territory. He was raised on the Poundmaker First Nation near Cutknife, Saskatchewan and is a graduate of the First Nations University of Canada. He is a Plains Cree 'Y' dialect speaker.

 

Mr. Tootoosis has worked in diverse business environments during his 20 year professional career. He was consulting for the Saskatchewan Labour Force Development Board, Aboriginal Human Resource Development Council of Canada, Aboriginal Workforce Participation Initiative, the Casino Industry, and the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations prior to joining SaskPower as the Diversity Advisor in 2002.

 

He is active in the community. He is currently a director for the Aboriginal Leadership Institute Inc., a member of the Regina Police Service Community Advisory Committee and he is founder of numerous events for the Aboriginal community.

 

Giovanna Pirro, Director, Community Partnerships and Settlement, Saskatchewan Immigration Branch, who will share her own immigration story. She was born in Panama and lived in England and the United States before moving to Saskatchewan 12 years ago.

 

Nichole Huck, a Regina journalist who recently  returned from Thailand where she lived with refugees from Burma who are part of the Karen ethnic group. Her desire to share what she experienced motivated her to photograph refugees inside the camps. Her photography exhibit "Life Inside" was on display at the Saskatchewan Cultural Exchange Society in Regina from Sept. 15-Oct.18, 2006. The exhibit is on display at the the fifth parallel Art Gallery at the University of Regina Oct 24- Oct 29, 2006 then in November it is moving to Estevan. The exhibit welcomes 810 new refugees to Canada, predominantly from the Karen ethnic group. Regina will receive 100 of these refugees. Nichole is currently working for CBC in Regina. She hopes her exhibit will foster understanding. "So often we see images from the other side of the world and are touched - but we feel powerless to do anything," she says. "This time we can." Nichole will discuss her motivation within the context of youth vision versus traditional approaches to multiculturalism and new developments in the ethnocultural arts.

 

Oksana Zwarych, a representative of the Tavria Ukrainian Folk Dance Ensemble will also share its success story with regards to new developments in the ethnocultural arts. Oksana appeared on the TV show Corner Gas twice.

 

"I was asked to speak about the successes of multicultural groups in Saskatchewan. I have been involved with the Ukrainian dance scene for over 27 years. I can only talk about the experiences with the Tavria Ukrainian Folk Dance Ensemble from Regina. I do not want you to think this is a boasting or egotistical, for I know and realize that there are many cultural singing, dancing and musical groups that have stories to tell you.

 

I have been involved with the dance groups for 27 years. As a dancer, as an Artistic Director, as a board member, and now as a parent. Tavria is one of the largest Ukrainian dance schools in Saskatchewan.

 

(A power point presentation is shown concurrent to the speech)

 

We have been very fortunate over the years to do numerous performances. Twice a year we perform at the Christmas Concert and the year end concert for our school. We perform at Malanka (Ukrainianian New Years) and annually at Mosaic.

 

We performed last year at the multicultural day which was held at the R.C.M.P. barracks.

 

We have performed annually in Saskatoon at Ukrainian Day in the Park, which is an annual performance commemorating Independence of Ukraine.

 

We have performed at P.E.I Festival by the Sea, Expo 86 and Headlined on the Holland Alaskan Cruise Line. We have been to Ukraine three times (1996, 2000 and 2006). We have performed in the Maritmes as well as Calgary. In our history we have performed in almost all the Canadian provinces.

 

Members of our group have danced on the well-known CTV show Corner Gas once in 2004 and again in 2005 on the episode 'Dog River Vices'. This show had a Ukrainian theme throughout.

 

For all this travelling and performing we are constantly fundraising. This is not unique for our organization, we are fortunate to have a large membership pool to draw on but what about smaller groups?

 

We have an annual fundraiser for our daily operations of our school. It is the Tavria Ukrainian Dance Festival. This competition attracts groups from Western Canada, Manitoba and the U.S.A. and of course Saskatchewan.

 

With the challenges of fundraising for the daily operations of the school and the ensemble as well as fundraising for costumes (they can be as expensive as $425 American for two costumes) and fundraising for trips it can be quite frustrating. Like many other groups we do not receive any funds from Sask. Lotteries. We do not receive any funds as do sports teams.

 

Multicultural groups are a dynamic part of todays youth demographics. Yet we do not share the same funding as sports/athletic groups do.

 

The sports groups have national bodies to lobby for them. They have national and international exposure. Olympics, professional teams, T.V. and other media help to elevate the exposure of sports and athletics.

 

What I believe is needed is a national organization that can lobby for our multicultural activities. With this growing concern for physical activity and well beling, I believe that multicultural activities should be a part of this campaign. If we compare to sports, a dance group promotes physical well being, it promotes unity, it nurtures leadership skills and social responsibility: - everything that sports does yet a dance group takes a back seat to the high profile sport funding that is available. And this is where we start. It is not the cure, there will always be fundraising activities, but we need to tell the government agencies and lottery purse string holders that Multicultural activities are good for the soul, good for the body, good for the spirit and as well we all know good for our cities and towns."

 

12 pm          Lunch and Sharing of Success Stories related to the focus areas. Fun rewards were offered                     participation! 

 

(L-R) Satpal Singh Virdi, Milton Tootoosis, Jay Kalra, Simon Ash Moccasin

 

(L-R) Nargis Bhimji, Raza Bhimji

 

1 pm             Focus Group Discussions 

 

Facilitators:

Focus Group One: Bruno Kossmann

Focus Group Two: Germaine Neapetung

Focus Group Three: Darlene Stakiw

Focus Group Four: Reggie Newkirk

Recorders:

Focus Group One: Chris Lygouriatis

Focus Group Two: Joanne Shannon

Focus Group Three: Judy Dielschneider

Focus Group Four: Rhonda Rosenberg

 

Focus Questions:

 

1. Complete the following sentences to describe your focus area within the context of your multicultural focus area for the next three years.

 

In the near future, the general public, such as students, teachers, cultural groups, businesses, sport, recreation and community groups will have

 

In the near future, the SaskCulture Multicultural Community of Interest Commiteee will have

 

In the near future, the provincial government will have

 

Shared Recommendations

 

2. What would successful achievement of your recommendations provide for:

  • you
  • your family
  • your community
  • your organiztion

 

3. What barriers are preventing successful achievement of these  recommendations:

Locally:

Provincially:

 

4. What advice do you have for successful achievement of these recommendations?

 

5. What are two things you can do to advance multiculturalism?

 

2:45 pm       Break

 

3:00 pm       Reporting Back

 

3:45 pm       Closing Remarks and Next Steps 

 

To register, email info@mcoi.ca or mcos@accesscomm.ca or phone (306) 721-2767. Please note, a second consultation is tentatively planned for Saskatoon in 2007. Delegates are invited to attend one session. Travel stipends may be available for non profit or community delegates. Corporate and government delegates are not eligible for the stipend. We may also be able to assist with carpooling. Call the office to discuss.

 

Keynote Speaker Biography:

Leonzo Barreno was born and raised in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala where he completed his primary and high school education. He moved to Saskatchewan in 1989 and earned his Bachelor of Arts, Honours, in Indian Studies in 1997 at the Saskatchewan Indian Federated College, University of Regina. He served as administrative assistant to the SIFC's Director of International Programs in 1992. In 1994 he was appointed coordinator of International Programs, a position he held until 1997. During his term as a co-ordinator, more than 70 Indigenous young leaders from 20 countries received a certificate in International Indigenous Management. The program was also offered for two years in Costa Rica and one year in Chiapas, Mexico. Between 1998 and 1999 Mr. Barreno, in consultation with the SIFC Elders and executive, government representatives and Aboriginal youth, developed the concept, goal and activities of the Aboriginal Youth Leadership Development Program (AYLDP). Since 1999, AYLDP created several leadership, traditional and academic programs for Aboriginal youth and adults. In June, 2000, Mr. Barreno was appointed director of the Indigenous Centre for International Devlopment (ICID) of the SIFC. As the administrative head of both the AYLDP and ICID, Mr. Barreno was responsible for creating and implementing Leadership and Traditional programs for local Aboriginal people and to oversee SIFC's International commitments. One of the main duties under the International centre was to be the program manager of Indigenous Studies and Education program in partnership with the University of Chiapas, Mexico. The program resulted in the creation of a Masters in Indigenous Education and an undergraduate degree in Management and Indigenous Self Development in Mexico.

 

Mr. Barreno taught the course International Indigenous Issues at SIFC for seven years. He also taught the course Indigenous Philosophy and Religion in the winter of 2002. He concluded his work relationship with the First Nations University of Canada (formerly the SIFC) in February, 2006. In the winter of 2003, he served as the Global Chair for the School of Journalism, University of Regina. He will hold the same position for the winter of 2007.

 

Mr. Barreno has given presentations about Indigenous development and Indigenous highter education in several universities and forums in Chile, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Peru, Ecuador, Brazil and Mexico and to the Inter American Development Bank in Washington. He is the author of a study about Higher Education and Programs for Indigenous people in Latin America. The initial survey was used as a working document by UNESCO-Latin America gathering of international experts in the topic in Guatemala in April, 2002. In January, 2003, Mr. Barreno was approached by the Senate of Canada Standing Committee on Aboriginal People, to participate in a study to examine the issues affecting Aboriginal youth as the Committee aimed to develop an "Action Plan for Change" that will benefit Aboriginal youth.

 

Mr. Barreno completed his Masters of Arts (Justice Studies) courses in 2006. In April of the same year he was hired by the extension division of the University of Saskatchewan as co-ordinator of the Intercultural Leadership program. He provides training to Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth in intercultural issues. The program's content and format is being shared with the Indigenous program of one of the oldest universities in the Americas: The National University of San Marcos, Peru.

 

Mr. Barreno has served on several local, national and international boards.

He is a Mayan Indigenous person and a traditional Mayan timekeeper.

 


Youth Action Now

 

Results, Accomplishments, Changes and Future

Presentation to the MCOI Community Consultation

By Victoria Morris, Feb. 10, 2007 

 

Throughout 2004 and 2005, Youth Action Now consulted ~2,000 young people across the province about their vision for the future of multiculturalism in <state w:st="on"><place w:st="on">Saskatchewan</place></state>

The hundreds and hundreds of ideas of these 2,000 youth were compiled into recommendations in the YAN Blueprint for Action.

 

What were the recommendation themes?

•         Multiculturalism integrated into education

•         Multiculturally enhanced communities

•         Multiculturally engaged youth

•         Youth in multicultural dialogue

•         Youth’s voice in multiculturalism

•         Expanded multicultural programming in mainstream media

•         Multiculturalism makes cents

 

Who were the recommendations for?

 

•         Government, all levels

•         Ethno-cultural and multicultural orgs

•         Youth

•         Media

•         Business

•         The recommendations included some for immediate action, 1-2 years, five year outcomes, as well as overarching recommendations

 

So, what has happened since YAN with…

 

•         Government

 

 

•         Schools

 

 

•         UCC-SPC and MCoS

 

 

•         The Youth Volunteers – Youth Advisory Committee and school workshop Facilitators

 

SK Learning- Interested and working on implementing some of the recommendations, including a multicultural lens/filters to curriculum reviews, increasing accessibility for youth to languages/language classes

 

 

Many of the schools where youth forums were held continue to see the effects of YAN….

 

 

•         Carpenter High, in <place w:st="on"><placename w:st="on">Meadow</placename> <placetype w:st="on">Lake</placetype></place> is still doing annual multicultural days/festival at their school

 

 

•         Lipton High is also continuing to organize annual multicultural activities

 

 

•         Churchill Composite in La Ronge has continued to place emphasis on highlighting cultural activities for students, as well as sending students to events and organizing their own events

 

 

•         Mount Royal Collegiate in <city w:st="on"><place w:st="on">Saskatoon</place></city> continues to support a First Nations student dance troupe and is also working to enhance their support of their ESL programming

 

•         UCC-SPC is still interested in continuing to work on enhancing the results/ work done through YAN, and working on multicultural issues in SK

 

 

•         MCoS continues their emphasis on multicultural activities, and demonstrating youth leadership with their activities

 

 

•         A U of R Faculty of Education professor is incorporating some of the ideas in the YAN report into her course curriculum

 

 

•         One of the projects we partnered with - Ukrainian dancing in a community school in <city w:st="on"><place w:st="on">Saskatoon</place></city> - was wildly popular among students and teachers, so work is being done to continue a partnership with community schools to deliver ethno- and multi-cultural activities.

 

 

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Awareness and Attitudes

 

 

Adventures and opportunities of the youth volunteers

 

 

 

•         In 2006, Margarita attended a youth conference RESOLVE IT! Also, she completed a Canadian part of Canada World Youth exchange to <country-region w:st="on"><place w:st="on">Indonesia</place></country-region>.

 

 

•         Mina and Naima and Gabby (and I'm sure others as well) have gone to multicultural events

 

 

•         Calista… indirectly, it's been amazingly valuable for my career(s) - both professional and volunteer.

 

 

•         Gabby attended the Youth conference Resolve it! on conflict resolution put on by YOUCAN, she went to that with margarita! also this summer she went to <state w:st="on"><place w:st="on">Quebec</place></state> for 5 weeks as part of the french immersion program 'J'explore'

 

 

•         Hope is taking part in a Canada World Youth Exchange

 

 

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David:

 

 

I'm now in the UofA Medicine program, living in the residence called 'International House' - must have been my multicultural background that let me in.

 

 

I'm continuing the Economics Flag project here in <city w:st="on">Edmonton</city>, while ACE <state w:st="on">Saskatchewan</state> is doing it back in <city w:st="on"><place w:st="on">Saskatoon</place></city>. I'm making the game bigger and better, involving international students here in iHouse, as well as partnering with a social justice group here known as Eonfire and SIFE Alberta.

 

 

I'm also starting a group here (partnered with Global Education at the <place w:st="on"><placename w:st="on">International</placename> <placetype w:st="on">Center</placetype></place> at the UofA) called the ‘Global Education Special Service’ which will bring, well, global education to the masses. The aforementioned Economics Flag project will be one of the first run under the GESS banner.

 

 

Krupal:

 

 

 

<address w:st="on">United Way</address>

</street> funding) and recommend the funding they receive from <street w:st="on">

<address w:st="on">United Way</address>

</street> to the United Way Board. I started this January and will finish in March. There are about 7 different panels and I am on a panel with 3 other people. We are visiting 4 agencies: Catholic Family Services, Canadian Mental Health, YWCA and Sask. Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services.

 

It is not directly related to YAN, however it definitely utilizes some of skills that I learned and refined while involved in YAN. Additionally, I think I am only one of the two Univ. Students involved in it.

 

Other than that I am just busy with school.

 

 

Ashley:

 

 

Since YAN I have stayed involved with the National Association of Friendship Centres. I help in the aboriginal community. Though I am more conscious to not be racist against other cultures but embrace our differences.

 

 

Being apart of YAN opened my eyes to other cultures in <place w:st="on"><state w:st="on">Saskatchewan</state></place>. I would like to see more provincial initiatives involving youth and multiculturalisim.

 

 

I had a baby he is 9 months old named Dontae Bear, he is a Plains Cree First Nations from Ochapowace First Nation.

 

 

I also got on the Provincial Youth Advisory Committee, for those who do not know that this is, it is a NDP Provincial Gov. Youth Committee, all on this committee are appointed by the Minister of Culture, Youth and Recreation. So it is pretty big and fun. I always stress the importance of how we need to share and not be ignorant of each other and our cultures. As I know that a lot of racism still exists today.

 

 

Being an Aboriginal person, has opened my eyes to having racism thrown at me. YAN has helped me to be proud to be a person from a strong culture. I was always interested in other cultures, but I want to see more YAN PROJECTS.......

 

 

Lorin:

 

 

I too learned a lot of other cultures and also a lot about myself. I was actually afraid or felt i didn’t belong when I first met with members of YAN. Growing up (to put it mildly) under-privileged, one thinks they are not worthy to be associated with other people especially such bright, talented people as the YAN members.

 

Anyway, interacting and learning of other cultural backgrounds made me realize that I too was somebody. I got a real boost of confidence from YAN. Since the YAN experience I have gone places and done things that I never would have dreamed I'd do in a life time. The last European trip I took I traveled with Dance SK. and performed not only with First Nation dancers but other contemporary dancers of various ethnic backgrounds.

 

One day we were all gathered on a beach in <city w:st="on"><place w:st="on">Holland</place></city> with the contemporary dancers on one side and the First Nation dancers on the other, divided as we have been for many years. Not thinking anything I kicked the ball up as high as I could on the beach and a gust of wind carried the ball to the contemporary dancers. I stood there watching as the two different types of dancers began kicking the ball to each other then slowly came together to have a huge volleyball game on the beach. We broke down a huge racial barrier right then and there.  My friend stood by me and said you're awesome. Look at what you managed to do. I said I didn’t do a damn thing but kick a ball in the air. There was a reason that gust of wind came when it did. I then realized I have been forgetting to acknowledge and pay respect to all the elements of mother nature, including the wind.

 

We went over to <place w:st="on">Europe</place> as Dance SK. the Native dancers and contemporary dancers. But we came back as just Dance SK. Good solid friendships were created on that trip and a new understanding and respect for all other ethnic backgrounds. I was the co-choreographer of the piece we performed over there. I strongly believe that organizations and gatherings that YAN offered helped me too to open up and realize more of my self and my potential. That's just one of the stories of the trip.

 

 

 

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