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Amazon River

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Britannica Concise Encyclopedia
Portuguese Rio Amazonas, Spanish Río Amazonas, also called Río Marañón and Rio Solimões

River, northern South America.

It is the largest river in the world in volume and area of drainage basin; only the Nile River of eastern and northeastern Africa exceeds it in length. It originates within 100 mi (160 km) of the Pacific Ocean in the Peruvian Andes Mountains and flows some 4,000 mi (6,400 km) across northern Brazil into the Atlantic Ocean. Its Peruvian length is called the Marañón River; the stretch of river from the Brazilian border ... (100 of 9504 words)

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Amazon River - Children's Encyclopedia (Ages 8-11)

The Amazon is the mightiest river in South America. It carries more water than any other river. It is about 4,000 miles (6,400 kilometers) long. Only the Nile River in Africa is longer.

Amazon River - Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up)

The greatest river of South America, the Amazon is also the world’s largest river in water volume and the area of its drainage basin. Together with its tributaries the river drains an area of 2,722,000 square miles (7,050,000 square kilometers)-roughly one third of the continent. It empties into the Atlantic Ocean at a rate of about 58 billion gallons (220,000 cubic meters) per second.

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The topic Amazon River is discussed at the following external Web sites.
Hamline University - Center for Glogal Environmental Education - The Amazon River
MBarron.net - Amazon River
Amazon Rain Forest - Amazon River
ThinkQuest - Amazon River
How Stuff Works - Geography - Geography of Amazon River
Extreme Science - The Greatest River - Amazon

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