Temperatures reach record high in Pakistan

Meteorologists record a temperature of 53.7C (129F) in Mohenjo-daro as heatwave continues across Pakistan and India

A Pakistani boy cools off in a park in Multan
A Pakistani boy cools off in a park in Multan, as temperatures reached record highs in a continuing heatwave. Photograph: MK Chaudhry/EPA

Mohenjo-daro, a ruined city in what is now Pakistan that contains the last traces of a 4,000-year-old civilisation that flourished on the banks of the river Indus, today entered the modern history books after government meteorologists recorded a temperature of 53.7C (129F). Only Al 'Aziziyah, in Libya (57.8C in 1922), Death valley in California (56.7 in 1913) and Tirat Zvi in Israel (53.9 in 1942) are thought to have been hotter.

Temperatures in the nearest town, Larkana, have been only slightly lower in the last week, with 53C recorded last Wednesday. As the temperatures peaked, four people died, including a prisoner serving a life sentence for murder and an elderly woman. Dozens are said to have fainted.

The extreme heat was exacerbated by chronic power cuts which have prevented people from using air-conditioning. The electricity has cut out for eight hours each day as part of a severe load-shedding regime that has caused riots in other parts of Pakistan where cities are experiencing a severe heatwave with temperatures of between 43C and 47C.

"It's very tough," said M B Kalhoro, a local correspondent for Dawn.com, an online newspaper. "When the power is out, people just stay indoors all the time."

The blistering heat now engulfing Pakistan stretches to India where more than 1,000 people have reportedly died of heatstroke or heart attacks in the last two months. Although Europe and China have experienced cooler than average winters, record or well-above average temperatures have been recorded in Tibet and Burma this year.

Southern Europe was yesterday rapidly warming after a particularly cool winter. Thirteen provinces in southern Spain, including Andalucia, Murcia and the Canary islands, were put on "yellow alert" after meteorologists forecast temperatures rising to 38C (99F) in Cadiz, Córdoba, Jaén, Malaga and Seville.

According to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), the national climate monitoring service that measures global temperatures by satellite, 2010 is shaping up to be one of the hottest years on record. The first four months were the hottest ever measured, with record spring temperatures in northern Africa, south Asia and Canada.

The global temperature for March was a record 13.5C (56.3F) and average ocean temperatures were also the hottest for any March since record-keeping began in 1880.

As a result of high sea surface temperatures, the Atlantic hurricane season, which officially started today is now expected to be one of the most intense in years. Last week NOAA predicted 14 to 23 named storms, including eight to 14 hurricanes, three to seven of which were likely to be "major" storms, with winds of at least 111mph. This is compared to an average six-month season of 11 named storms, six of which become hurricanes, two of them major.

On Sunday, scientists reported that Africa's Lake Tanganyika, the second deepest freshwater lake in the world, is now at its warmest in 1,500 years, threatening the fishing industry on which several million lives depend. The lake's surface waters, at 26C (78.8F), have reached temperatures that are "unprecedented since AD500," they reported in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Some scientists have suggested that the warming experienced around the world this year is strongly linked to warmer than usual currents in the Pacific Ocean, a regular phenomenon known as El Niño. Others say that it is consistent with long-term climate change.


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  • MeltingPots

    1 June 2010 6:34PM

    Well, Pakistan is being destabilised not only by means of covert operations but also by pollution from the neighbourhood.

  • CllrRupertRead

    1 June 2010 6:38PM

    Thanks John.
    There is some evidence that having more and stronger El Nino events is a RESULT of manmade climate change, by the way.
    Mike Davis's superb book 'Late Victorian Holocausts' is worth a read in this general connection.

  • Arbuthnott

    1 June 2010 6:46PM

    Well, for us this has been quite a cool and mild start to the year. We have had the heating off in the house since the start of March (which is normal - fantastic insulation and a southern aspect in a sun-trap), despite subsequent fall in temperatures and quite heavy snow again in April. We have had one or two warm days, but nothing like the last three years, and happily we have had a lot more rain. Several of our fruit trees have been in a stressed state, consistent with much of the village, after the very low rainfall last year - the lowest Summer rainfall that any of us can remember. Our temperatures are notably related to cloud cover (and so often inversely related to the amount of rain). The local rainfall minimum was in the last 5 years or so, the previous peak in the early 1970s, in what appears to be a 60 year cycle. As the precipitation slowly trends upwards again, we may see a reversal of the slow retreat of the glaciers which has been evident. Lots of sun and lower precipitation is not great for the glaciers! We always have a few days below -25C in the Winter, and this past Winter was not much colder than "usual" - but there were a lot more days at -25C and we used almost 20% more fuel than usual, which is a function of the extended cold period. From the feel of the weather (and judging from over 40 years of observing it), this Summer is going to be both cooler and wetter than we have had for some time. This time last year, it was often uncomfortably warm for strenuous walks unless we were well above 1500 metres of elevation.

    The cynical might accuse me of making observations based on a spot sample of local weather rather than any profound observations on climate.

    This would be true, but with much better background than the extraordinary grab-bag of sensationalist "high temperature bad news" stats cobbled together for this article. Indeed this article is reminiscent of the great "shark attack" news year, where a record number of shark attack stories marked out an otherwise perfectly average year. The word "irresponsible" does come to mind ...

  • rojh

    1 June 2010 7:02PM

    @Arbuthnott

    I agree that the press is sensationalist and is biased in favour of records. Your account is descriptive of a local area and not trying to grab readership by selecting the juicy bits.

    Never-the-less I thought it note-worthy that the global March temp was a record high.

  • Sweeting

    1 June 2010 7:08PM

    This comment has been removed by a moderator. Replies may also be deleted.

  • Arbuthnott

    1 June 2010 7:14PM

    @ rojh
    1 Jun 2010, 7:02PM

    Never-the-less I thought it note-worthy that the global March temp was a record high.

    To be honest, all I can be sure of is my personal observations. These reports of record high world-wide average temperatures are noteworthy, but I am not at all sure of what the basis is for declaring them. I notice with interest that raw temperature data gets "corrected". This graph was posted on another comment string a couple of days ago, which raises my uncertainty about what the "official" figures show.

  • JethroBajwa

    1 June 2010 7:41PM

    Tirat Zvi in Israel (53.9 in 1942)

    You mean Palestine? The land was "Palestine" in 1942, please correct.

  • ScepticMike

    1 June 2010 7:56PM

    Arbuthnot
    Just google there is plenty of information out there to supplement your personal observations.

  • Teratornis

    1 June 2010 8:24PM

    Arbuthnott:

    To be honest, all I can be sure of is my personal observations. These reports of record high world-wide average temperatures are noteworthy, but I am not at all sure of what the basis is for declaring them. I notice with interest that raw temperature data gets "corrected". This graph was posted on another comment string a couple of days ago, which raises my uncertainty about what the "official" figures show.

    Scientists routinely correct data. For example, if you repeat the experiments that determined the rest mass of the electron, you would be unlikely to get exactly the same number each time. That probably does not mean you have changed the rest mass of the electron. More likely it means your equipment or procedure went awry. Anyone who has taken a laboratory course knows how difficult it is to run measurements perfectly every time.

    Scientists are not just guessing when they correct data. They rely on their long familiarity with the subject matter, statistical understanding of how errors tend to behave, and theoretical models of what they are studying.

    As another example, if a paleontologist was digging through cave deposits thought to be 2 million years old, and uncovered a modern artifact such as a wristwatch, that wouldn't instantly overturn everything scientists think they know about the history of the earth. First it would be necessary to consider every alternative explanation, starting with deliberate or accidental site contamination.

    In every science there will always be a few oddball observations that can't be accounted for by any plausible theory. The whole realm of ufology is based on the residue of UFO observations that haven't been confidently ruled out as weather balloons, atmospheric inversions, swamp gas, etc. However, science cannot be based on residual observations, but only on the preponderance of reproducible observations.

    As to the impact of measurement uncertainty, note that it is generally easier to determine whether a quantity is increasing or decreasing over time, than to determine its exact value at a given time. Corrections to data may raise questions about the exact momentary value of something, but any underlying trend should be robust against corrections.

    To illustrate this, consider the difficulty of counting exactly how many people are in the UK just now. Census takers use corrections to account for people who purposely avoid being counted and so on. Therefore, nobody knows exactly how many people are in the UK today. But can there be any doubt that more people are in the UK now than there were in 1900? Does the fact that the population data includes corrections cause you to doubt that population has actually grown?

    The rate at which the earth is warming as humans continue to raise the concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is not a function of whether any particular person understands the methodology of climate scientists. The earth will warm whether it makes sense to you or anyone else. Nature does not conform herself to the egocentric world view.

  • Ariege

    1 June 2010 8:33PM

    This comment has been removed by a moderator. Replies may also be deleted.

  • Vyse

    1 June 2010 8:36PM

    This comment has been removed by a moderator. Replies may also be deleted.

  • Smogbound

    1 June 2010 8:42PM

    I guess the deniers will add thermometer manufacturers to the long list of people in their ficticious conspiracy.

  • KingInYellow

    1 June 2010 8:45PM

    Arbuthnott

    This graph was posted on another comment string a couple of days ago, which raises my uncertainty about what the "official" figures show.

    Why should an unreferenced graphic purporting to show two temperature graphs with different scaled axes, of 2% of the earth's surface, in anyway be taken seriously as part of the scientific argument ?

    All the best.

  • rigmarole

    1 June 2010 8:57PM

    Why does the headline link for this use farhenheit? This is not the USA, we use a sensible measure called celsis. Next you'll be writing homicide instead of murder. I also note the Guardian has adopted a senseless policy of writing 'the' when 'a' would be much more pleasant to read, for example on today's website front page: "Anthony Gormley, the sixty-nine year old". So HE is THE 69 year old, as if there's no-one else in the country who is 69 years old. And yet you have some semi-regular feature with David Mitchell harping on like I am now about Americanisms and other abuses of the English language.

  • TofuEater

    1 June 2010 9:02PM

    Evening All,

    Mr Rigmarole: Brilliantly said. Spot on.

    I hope that people like Mr Monbiot noted the part of the article that said:

    The extreme heat was exacerbated by chronic power cuts which have prevented people from using air-conditioning. The electricity has cut out for eight hours each day as part of a severe load-shedding regime that has caused riots in other parts of Pakistan where cities are experiencing a severe heatwave with temperatures of between 43C and 47C.

    ..when he writes his articles implying windpower is the answer to all our ills. Isn't it wonderful to be able to use modern technology to keep ourselves warm or cool?

    Peace and Love.

  • Smogbound

    1 June 2010 9:13PM

    rigmarole
    Why does the headline link for this use farhenheit? This is not the USA, we use a sensible measure called celsis.

    It quotes temperatures in Celsius and Fahrenheit. Many older Brits - my mother included - are accustomed to using Fahrenheit. Forty years ago the average Daily Mail reader would have been having fits about using Celsius, and stating 'we are not France, we use a sensible measure called Fahrenheit'.

  • TBombadil

    1 June 2010 9:24PM

    TofuEater
    1 Jun 2010, 9:02PM

    ..when he writes his articles implying windpower is the answer to all our ills. Isn't it wonderful to be able to use modern technology to keep ourselves warm or cool?

    The ideal way of driving air conditioning units would surely be to use solar power. More sunshine equals more heat and more output from the solar cells to power the air conditioning units.

  • Smogbound

    1 June 2010 9:38PM

    TofuEater
    Isn't it wonderful to be able to use modern technology to keep ourselves warm or cool?

    You mean its wonderful that we can minutely adjust temperatures in our already mild climate rather than having to wear appropriate clothing, and its other people in 3rd world countries that we don't care about who are dying as a result of our reckless energy use.

  • Ursi

    1 June 2010 9:41PM

    Above 40 degrees celsius and the ambient temperature is unbearable. It happens regularly in summer in the northern hemisphere, get over it. We have on a global scale, what's known as 'air conditioning'. Above 25C this will kick in for most people, I can't even begin to imagine what almost 58C would feel like - Libya and rounding up.

    Air conditioning takes up so much energy, and Italy, as a European model, regularly has power cuts in its major cities during the overloaded tourist season. And often the air conditioning doesn't work. It cuts out during the day and pitifully comes back at night. Why bother? Better building design or installing new measures to ensure more effective insulation of old buildings would be an economic life saver. I've not been to Italy for years and I'm relying on anecodotal evidence, precursor to scientific methods. And surely someone will come along and point the scientific way forward. No doubt.

    Global warming is alive and well. It's been here for decades. Take the fingers out of your ears and stop singing 'La la la I'm not listening'.

    It helps no one.

  • MrBronze

    1 June 2010 10:07PM

    I know it's a strawman but if the earth was cooling rather than warming and the arctic ice cap and glaciers were creeping south toward the US and Europe would the prevailing attitude toward poor hot countries still be so callous or would we be plowing cash into them to help get them ready for our arrival?

  • antipodean1

    1 June 2010 10:08PM

    oh dear @Arbuthnot

    all I can be sure of is my personal observations. These reports of record high world-wide average temperatures are noteworthy, but I am not at all sure of what the basis is for declaring them

    If all you can be sure of is your personal observations, why bother watching the news or the weather forecast? Why bother reading this article?

    Surely the basis for declaring record high world wide temperatures is that they are records and that they are catastrophic to thoe who are experiencing them! Thats why we are interested. Of course standing alone this report could simply be an anomaly, but in context of the IPCC report, http://www.ipcc.ch/ it may amount to further corroborative evidence of ACC.

    On the other hand it could be part of a vast global conspiracy to impose world government and more taxes.

  • TouchtoneGnome

    1 June 2010 10:16PM

    It's not the change in temperatures that is the problem, the earth has been hotter and colder than it is now.

    Its the rate of change. It's never been so buggered so quickly.

  • TBombadil

    1 June 2010 10:16PM

    Arbuthnott
    1 Jun 2010, 7:14PM

    These reports of record high world-wide average temperatures are noteworthy, but I am not at all sure of what the basis is for declaring them. I notice with interest that raw temperature data gets "corrected". This graph was posted on another comment string a couple of days ago, which raises my uncertainty about what the "official" figures show.

    Perhaps the answer is to read the explanation for those corrections by Hansen himself.

  • TofuEater

    1 June 2010 10:19PM

    Evening Mr Bombardi, Mr Ursi,

    It would be lovely, wouldn't it, to use solar? Such an elegant solution, however currently both solar panels and air conditioning units aren't efficient enough.

    For example:

    Air conditioning units require 3 to 20 KW = 3,000 to 20,000 W

    Solar produces 19 to 56 W/m2

    This equates to a Minimum area of 53 m^2 to a max of 1052 m^2 for ONE air-conditioning unit. I wouldn't want to see the face of the Rome town planner when he/she sees the planning applications for all those..!

    Better building design is one answer. Why have we not learned the lessons of the past? In Seville (c1400) the Moors designed buildings with a central column, open but shaded at the top and a fountain at the bottom. This created a constant cool breeze, without a solar panel in sight.

    In modern times lets just go NUCLEAR!

    Peace and Love.

  • TofuEater

    1 June 2010 10:22PM

    This comment has been removed by a moderator. Replies may also be deleted.

  • Ursi

    1 June 2010 10:38PM

    @TofuEater,
    That would be female Ursi. Please, never the Mr. And to ask respectfully to not presume in future.

    So where in my post did I suggest to go solar? I suggested as you have done better building design or modification of older buildings which is what attracts the tourist to the city in the first place and then when it's too hot, they complain. There is a solution. It may upset the status quo but it's douable.

    I've no problem with nuclear btw.

  • Arbuthnott

    1 June 2010 10:50PM

    @ KingInYellow
    1 Jun 2010, 8:45PM

    Why should an unreferenced graphic purporting to show two temperature graphs with different scaled axes, of 2% of the earth's surface, in anyway be taken seriously as part of the scientific argument ?

    Because both these graphs are from the GISS web site, but different versions, that's why.

  • TofuEater

    1 June 2010 10:50PM

    Apologies Ms Ursi,

    I agree. The Romans designed underfloor heating, the Moors 'air-conditioning', our solutions always seem to be so inelegant in comparison.

    Peace and Love.

  • Arbuthnott

    1 June 2010 10:54PM

    @ ScepticMike
    1 Jun 2010, 7:56PM

    Just google there is plenty of information out there to supplement your personal observations.

    Hmm. Several words there that cause me concern:

    "just Google" - as my father used to say when I was a child, just because it is written in a book does not make it true. I believe that this goes double for the Internet.

    "plenty of information" - in my world "information" has some special characteristics, quite distinct from a casual use of the word. Most of what is available does not even qualify as data.

    and just as an add-on to this, in my world "correction" means to eliminate an error or a bias to produce a "correct" result. In the case of these various adjustments of climate data, I would use the word "adjustment".

  • Arbuthnott

    1 June 2010 10:55PM

    This comment has been removed by a moderator. Replies may also be deleted.

  • NeverMindTheBollocks

    1 June 2010 10:58PM

    antipodean1

    Surely the basis for declaring record high world wide temperatures is that they are records and that they are catastrophic to thoe who are experiencing them! Thats why we are interested.

    Please remember that this is also the reason why we are interested in record low world wide temperatures too. Being too cold is also catastrophic to those who are experiencing it.

  • TofuEater

    1 June 2010 11:01PM

    Dear Mr Arbuthnott,

    To be honest, all I can be sure of is my personal observations. These reports of record high world-wide average temperatures are noteworthy, but I am not at all sure of what the basis is for declaring them. I notice with interest that raw temperature data gets "corrected". This graph was posted on another comment string a couple of days ago, which raises my uncertainty about what the "official" figures show.

    I sort of agree. The one that gets me is 1976. I remember it as one of the hottest years I've experienced in the UK. I remember distinctly that Tarmac melted, a local lake dried up and I saw fish drowning in the mud, I remember watching on TV as people feinted at Wimbledon Centre court.

    But we are informed by the official record, that it wasn't a very unusual year, and years like 1998, 2006 etc all of which slipped past without me noticing anything unusual were hotter.....It does make me wonder.

    Peace and Love

  • Arbuthnott

    1 June 2010 11:07PM

    @ antipodean1
    1 Jun 2010, 10:08PM

    On the other hand it could be part of a vast global conspiracy to impose world government and more taxes.

    Conspiracy? No, I think this is very unlikely. But I do think it is likely that there is considerable "common cause" that diverse people feel. The outcomes look similar, except in the latter there is no diabolical central organisation or deliberate coordination.

    If all you can be sure of is your personal observations, why bother watching the news or the weather forecast? Why bother reading this article?

    Many years ago, one of our Zambian house-servants, who we had left babysitting (and watching the telly) asked me in all seriousness if all Americans could fly. He did not readily distinguish the difference between the news services and the "Greatest American Superhero" which was all the rage at the time. Actually, he was probably right & I have an extremely low regard for infotainment. Perhaps you believe everything you see on the news or read in the newspaper?

    Surely the basis for declaring record high world wide temperatures is that they are records and that they are catastrophic to thoe who are experiencing them! Thats why we are interested. Of course standing alone this report could simply be an anomaly, but in context of the IPCC report, http://www.ipcc.ch/ it may amount to further corroborative evidence of ACC.

    Look, you may be a nice chap, but your use of the word "evidence" in this context simply excludes you from the set of all reliable decision makers.

    When people claim a "record high temperature" etc etc, I wonder if this is raw data, corrected data, or what basis. It is too easy to believe that all of the "climate science", or a critical mass of it., is correct and reliable & that the interpretations of it are realistic. But when I look at many of the individual papers, I am left looking at significant gaps or facing the hidden assumptions of the referenced material. No, I am not at all comfortable with these temperature claims & my level of trust in the people publishing them is very very low.

  • Arbuthnott

    1 June 2010 11:13PM

    @ TofuEater
    1 Jun 2010, 11:01PM

    I sort of agree. The one that gets me is 1976. I remember it as one of the hottest years I've experienced in the UK. I remember distinctly that Tarmac melted, a local lake dried up and I saw fish drowning in the mud, I remember watching on TV as people feinted at Wimbledon Centre court.

    I was working in the north-west of France that Summer. It was amazingly hot. It rained once in 10 weeks & there was very little cloud cover. So it was not just the UK. Difficult for me to comment on the other years you mentioned, because we were in various other places in the world. The wet season in 1977/78 in southern Africa was exceptional that year, though, with a degree of extensive flooding that has not been experienced subsequently.

  • Ursi

    1 June 2010 11:18PM

    Arrgh! no mf titles. I am Ursi. Don't presume anything. Okay?

    Now carry on as you will.

  • oldbrew

    1 June 2010 11:18PM

    So...

    Temperatures reach record high in PakistanMeteorologists record a temperature of 53.7C (129F) in Mohenjo-daro as heatwave continues across Pakistan and India

    ++++

    Here's another headline from Feb 2010:

    1.7 million livestock die in Mongolia freeze
    Temps as low as minus 58 F raise fears that toll could reach 4 million

    ++++

    Funny old world.

  • Arbuthnott

    1 June 2010 11:19PM

    @ Smogbound
    1 Jun 2010, 9:38PM

    You mean its wonderful that we can minutely adjust temperatures in our already mild climate rather than having to wear appropriate clothing, and its other people in 3rd world countries that we don't care about who are dying as a result of our reckless energy use.

    What gets me is that you genuinely believe this.

    When I was a child, it was food. When faced with something truly disgusting, one was then forced to eat it because of some (not fully clear) link with starving people in Africa. So these days it is the use of air conditioners. Don't use the air conditioner, think of all those starving people in Africa? Perhaps you could explain it to me, I could never understand it myself. Or perhaps you don't either?

  • MrBronze

    1 June 2010 11:19PM

    @Arbuthnott

    Are you a scientist yourself? Do you consider your judgement on the issues to be more accurate than those of people who are professionals in this field? Do you also disbelieve physicists who record their observations of space? Would you question the findings of your surgeon if he told you you needed an operation?

    Yes there are some incompetent/less diligent people in all walks of life but you are always doubting the majority verdict.

  • Arbuthnott

    1 June 2010 11:21PM

    @ oldbrew
    1 Jun 2010, 11:18PM

    Here's another headline from Feb 2010:

    1.7 million livestock die in Mongolia freeze
    Temps as low as minus 58 F raise fears that toll could reach 4 million

    I did not spot this temperature anomaly in this article. I am not sure why - surely there was no intent to provide a biased selection of temperature reports on the part of the author? Whatever would be the purpose of misleading the reader?

  • cannaman

    1 June 2010 11:26PM

    Arbuthnot,

    The link that you were given to Hansens own explanations of the changes that have occured during his 30 year career in climatology, clearly cover the whole of that period and he also states that the differences between the individual papers issued over the period are clearly explained in each of the original papers.
    Why do you claim that the period of the switch - graph that you have cut and pasted is in some way a hidden mystery? You are not usually prone to using someone elses suspicions and lack of investigation to enhance those that you have yourself.

    The whole library of giss is fully available on line, just check the papers and if you still have questions that were missed by every fanatical AGW sceptic at the time, why not post a specific question that is not simply asking someone else to do your legwork?

  • Arbuthnott

    1 June 2010 11:38PM

    @ MrBronze
    1 Jun 2010, 11:19PM

    Yes there are some incompetent/less diligent people in all walks of life but you are always doubting the majority verdict.

    This stuff does not work on the basis of majority verdicts. I don't know how you could ever have formed the opinion that this was the case. At the turn of the last century all of the leading scientists of the day estimated the age of the earth to be less than 100th of its "true" age. They arrived at their (remarkably similar) incorrect results by a variety of independent means. Although their work was essentially independent, they were no doubt comforted that they were all in reasonable agreement. They were nevertheless wildly wrong. Do you see any similarities here?

    Would you question the findings of your surgeon if he told you you needed an operation?

    Ever heard of a second opinion? Are you really telling me that you believe that medical professionals never get things seriously wrong? Really? Which planet did you say you are from?

    Are you a scientist yourself? Do you consider your judgement on the issues to be more accurate than those of people who are professionals in this field? Do you also disbelieve physicists who record their observations of space?

    I do not comment on my professional background. I make no claims as to my qualifications. However, are you saying that no-one but an expert on the particular topic can make a judgement about anything? Just think about it. It hugely amuses me to offer a casual opinion when in my walking gear to people, and to see their reaction if they see me in a work context with me offering the same opinions. People are far too inclined to dismiss wisdom if it is offered by a guy in shorts and a casual "T" shirt, and far too inclined to accept it as fact when presented by someone in a serious suit in a rather different context.

    Just to conclude, I thought you might be interested in the following quotes:

    As with all projections of the future, there will always be some uncertainty regarding the details of future climate change.

    Certain Earth system processes - such as icesheet dynamics, cloud processes, and regional climate effects - are either incompletely understood or not fully resolved in current climate models, leading to uncertainties in the magnitude and rate of global climate change and its manifestations at local and regional scales.

    There is also the potential that the Earth system could cross thresholds that result in abrupt changes or other "surprises" The potential consequences of such events could be irreversible and highly challenging, but their likelihood is not very well understood.

    From some "sceptical" web site? Actually no, these are from the "Complexities of Climate Change" section of this report From the US National Academy of Sciences.

    The issue is less that we are being misled by scientists and more by the way that the information is being put together and presented by the media and advocacy groups such as the IPCC.

  • TouchtoneGnome

    1 June 2010 11:39PM

    I said it earlier and you all ignored me. it's not the highs and lows, its the rate of change that is buggering us up.

    Previously migrations were made over thousands of years, soon we will have to make them over decades and as populations rise we are thunderfooked.

    People drowning in Bangladesh and droughing in Pakistan, it's just not suppose to happen so quickly.

  • MrBronze

    1 June 2010 11:43PM

    @Arbuthnott

    Ever heard of a second opinion?

    Yes, but you are still questioning a 1000 opinions, is my point.

  • AlanC

    1 June 2010 11:47PM

    TofuEater

    1 Jun 2010, 11:01PM

    I also remember the summer of 1976, the year my younger daughter was born. Bloody hot it was to - I took my classes out of the classroom as often as I could.

    However, you've obviously not read the link you provided if you think it doesn't show that 1976 was hot. Take another look - July 1976 hit 26.6C at Heathrow. Now look up and down the list - can you see another summer temperature exceeding this?

    There's July 1973 at 27.6C. July 2006 at 28.2C And that's it. So your claim that the official record says 'that it wasn't a very unusual year, and years like 1998, 2006 etc all of which slipped past without me noticing anything unusual were hotter' is rubbish. 1998 never gets past 23.5C. Generally it is a good idea to actually check your links before basing a post on them.

    The reason that you and I remember 1976 specifically (apart from my daughter's birth) was that it was not just a very hot summer but that it was also very dry for a very long time - as your fish memory suggests. 1976 had unusually long periods of drought and high temperatures - have a look at 1976 United Kingdom heat wave.

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    by Richard Mabey £10.99

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