(Canadian Press)  Japan lawmakers see video of ship collision near disputed islands that heated China relations.  November 2, 2010.

Members of Japan's parliament reviewed a video Monday showing a collision between a Chinese fishing boat and Japanese patrol vessels off disputed islands that has flared into an emotional row between the countries. The video, taken by the coast guard vessels involved, was shown to about 30 members of the lower house Budget Committee. It was reportedly about six minutes long. The video has not been made available to the public or other members of parliament. Japan's coast guard claims the captain of the Chinese ship refused to stop for an inspection and collided with its vessels. The captain was arrested and prosecutors considered pressing charges, but he was later released and sent back to China. The 14 crew members were released earlier.

The screening of the video, considered as evidence in possible further legal action against the captain, has raised concerns that it could rekindle emotions. Prime Minister Naoto Kan has seen it, government officials said, but his ruling party is against opposition demands that it be made more widely available.

A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman later Monday said the showing of the video changed nothing. "The so-called video cannot change the truth and cannot cover up the unlawfulness of the Japanese action," Ma Zhaoxu said in a statement posted on the ministry's website.

The Sept. 7 incident sparked a high-level tiff with Beijing because it occurred in waters near a group of islands claimed by Japan and China in the East China Sea. Several large anti-Japanese demonstrations have occurred in response across China. Called Diaoyu or Diaoyutai in Chinese and Senkaku in Japanese, the islands are controlled by Japan but also claimed by China. Located 120 miles (190 kilometres) east of Taiwan, the islands are surrounded by rich fishing grounds and are regularly occupied by nationalists from both sides.

After the collision, China demanded an apology and compensation, but Tokyo countered by demanding that Beijing pay for damage to the patrol boats. Beijing cut off ministerial-level contacts with Japan, repeatedly called in Tokyo's ambassador to complain, and postponed talks on the joint development of undersea natural gas fields.

(The Associated Press)  Purported video behind China-Japan clash leaked    November 5, 2010.

Japanese officials are checking the authenticity of a video purportedly showing a collision between Japanese coast guard vessels and a Chinese fishing boat off disputed islands that was leaked Friday, potentially worsening a dispute between the Asian neighbors. Coast guard spokeswoman Mariko Inoue said the government is checking into the video, which was shown on YouTube and then Japanese television networks.

The Sept. 7 collision sparked a high-level tiff with Beijing because it occurred in waters near a group of islands claimed by Japan and China in the East China Sea. Several large anti-Japanese demonstrations have occurred in response across China.

The video has raised concerns it could rekindle the dispute ahead of an international summit in Japan next week. Tokyo hopes to have a bilateral meeting with China's leader on the sidelines of the summit. The video showed a trawler bumping a Japanese vessel, while sirens wailed in the background and the Japanese crew shouted orders for the ship to stop. A voice on the video said in Japanese, "The ship is taking aggressive action." The ship then appeared to ram the Japanese vessel. "Check our position!," the voice said. The trawler then steamed away.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshito Sengoku called the leak of the video "unexpected and grave" because it is evidence in a continuing investigation into the collision. Sengoku also confirmed Friday that China has questioned Japan about the leak through diplomatic channels. "I don't think the Japanese government at this juncture intends to release the video," said Noriyuki Shikata, spokesman for prime minister's office. "The prime minister is saying that we have to conduct a thorough investigation and try find out the background of what happened, although we haven't confirmed that this is the true video."

On Monday, about 30 members of Japan's parliament reviewed a video of the collision which was reportedly about six minutes long. The video was not officially made available to the public or other members of parliament, however. "If this means that information from the government has been leaked, we must handle this as an incident," Japanese Foreign Minister Seiji Maehara told a parliament committee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suppose you walked into a store called QQ.  You point to a QQ shoe brand and you say, "I want this!"  The QQ salesperson will bring this pair of QQ shoes to you with both hands.

That's natural, right?

But that's not how reality works.

Let us say that you chose to have a 360 display window to be placed around the QQ store.  You point through the display window to a QQ shoe brand and you say, "I want this!"  So the 360 salesperson brings over a pair of shoes to you with both hands.  You leave with the shoes without carefully inspecting them.  Well, sorry, you lost out.  Because if you inspect the shoes carefully, you will be astonished to find that this is a pair of 360 brand shoes!

Yes, the great and smart 360 has made a decision for you: you want 360 and not QQ!  This is "hijacking."

Well, you may find the above scenario to be unthinkable.  But you ought to take a look at the following screen captures:


Here is your QQ screen on a normal computer.  If you click on the "Safety" button at the bottom, you reach QQ's safety page.


But if you had installed 360's "Koukou Bodyguard," then something else happens when you click on QQ's "Safety" button.  You get directed to QQ's "Koukou Bodyguard" page instead!

If you are familiar with the history of Google and Baidu, you will know that QQ was far from the first victim.  Within the 360 browser, if you search either Google or Baidu, you end up with the results from a different search engine.  Isn't this awesome?

Did 360 tell you (whom 360 claims to protect) about what is going on?  I am afraid not.

In the explanation of "Koukou Bodyguard," 360 said: "We tacitly state that we do not alter any QQ features.  All functions are enabled by the user himself, and they can be used/restored anytime."  But 360 is doing the exact opposite.  First of all, they have tacitly re-directed the destination of QQ's "Safety" button.  Secondly, the process was not enabled by the user who is not informed about what is going on.

"Strictly speaking, 360's Koukou Bodyguard is hacking QQ's Safety button.  This is the first occurrence in the history of software around the world.  Within the software industry, the most basic rule is that software ought to be independent entities which can compete fairly with each other.  Your software should not intrude into someone else's software and modify their functions in order gain competitive advantage.  This is highway robbery.  Robbers do not compete; they intrude."

This type of hacking activity is like a shopping mall security guard who can barge into a store and replace your store counter with one displaying his products.

The Shanghai Internet Society Credit Investigation Website is actually not about consumer/corporate creditworthiness.  Instead, it is about 'credit' in the sense of the reputation of an individual or entity.

With respect to individuals, the website has 80 netizens who have been exposed for "illegal activities."  The netizens are identified only by their nicknames (such as "Jolin's shadow," "lin555" and even "anonymous").

The list of illegal activities include: issuing false invoices for a small fee; selling fake diplomas; posting pornographic photos; rumor mongering, disrupting public order.  These activities took place in local Shanghai websites such as KDS, Liba, etc as well as national websites such as Sina blog, Renren, QQ, etc.

Here are some examples:

  • On June 21, 2010, "Jolin's shadow" posted <The mistress price list for Shanghai female university students> including the photo of one student.  The price list shows the prices at 12 different universities ranging from 20,000 yuan to 500,000 yuan.  This post spread like wildfire and drew in the mainstream media.  According to news reports, "Jolin's shadow" was a man named Guan living in Lane 1053, Hongqiao Road, Changning district, Shanghai.  At the time, the Shanghai media reported: "According to the police investigation, Jolin's Shadow engaged in rumor mongering that disrupted public order.  After being lectured by the public security bureau in accordance with the law, Jolin's Shadow expressed genuine remorse."
     
  • "Han Naichuan" posted <Dark inside secrets about the university entrance exam> at Renren website.  After being lectured by the public security bureau in accordance with the law, "Han Naichuan" expressed remorse.
     
  • "Yellow -cao" organized an event for model airplane aficionados to fly model airplanes in Shanghai when such activity were explicitly banned during the World Expo.  After being lectured by the public security bureau in accordance with the law, "Yellow -cao" expressed remorse.
     
  • "zzj00" was displeased with a traffic fine and went on the Internet to say that he "wants to follow the footsteps of Yang Jia."  After being lectured by the public security bureau in accordance with the law, "zzj00" expressed remorse.
     
  • "357156568" went on the Internet to say that "he lost his job twice already, he has no money, therefore he is going to bomb the World Expo."  "357156568" was placed under administrative detention.

In addition, the Shanghai Internet Society Credit Investigation Website also rated various local Shanghai websites.  Of those rated, 30 received five stars and only Tudou and Dingding received four stars.


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