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New York

1:03 PM ET

Senate 99% reporting

  Candidate Party Votes Pct.  
Ny-schumer
Charles E. Schumer
Dem. 2,710,735 65.4% Incumbent
Jay Townsend
Rep. 1,365,439 33.0%  
Colia Clark
Green 39,815 1.0%  
Randy Credico
Lib. 25,975 0.6%  

Senate Special Election 99% reporting

  Candidate Party Votes Pct.  
Ny-gillibrand
Kirsten Gillibrand
Dem. 2,519,806 61.2% Incumbent
Joseph DioGuardi
Rep. 1,505,183 36.6%  
Cecile Lawrence
Green 34,065 0.8%  
Joseph Huff
Ind. 19,708 0.5%  
John Clifton
Lib. 17,872 0.4%  
Vivia Morgan
Ind. 13,058 0.3%  
Bruce Blakeman
Ind. 7,429 0.2%  

Governor 99% reporting

  Candidate Party Votes Pct.  
Ny-cuomo
Andrew Cuomo
Dem. 2,602,443 61.4%  
Carl Paladino
Rep. 1,445,779 34.1%  
Howie Hawkins
Green 58,123 1.4%  
Warren Redlich
Lib. 45,865 1.1%  
Jimmy McMillan
Ind. 40,900 1.0%  
Kristin Davis
Ind. 22,931 0.5%  
Charles Barron
Frdm. 20,658 0.5%  

House of Representatives

District Democrat Republican Other Reporting
1
51.0% Bishop*
49.0% Altschuler
  100%
2
56.6% Israel*
42.6% Gomez
0.8% Other
100%
3
28.0% Kudler
72.0% King*
  100%
4
53.7% McCarthy*
46.3% Becker
  99%
5
62.4% Ackerman*
36.9% Milano
0.7% Other
100%
6
84.9% Meeks*
15.1% Taub
  100%
7
79.7% Crowley*
19.0% Reynolds
1.3% Other
100%
8
75.0% Nadler*
25.0% Kone
  100%
9
58.5% Weiner*
41.5% Turner
  100%
10
91.0% Towns*
7.2% Muniz
1.8% Other
100%
11
90.3% Clarke*
9.7% Carr
  100%
12
92.9% Velázquez*
 
7.1% Other
100%
13
47.8% McMahon*
51.5% Grimm
0.7% Other
100%
14
74.9% Maloney*
21.7% Brumberg
3.4% Other
100%
15
79.9% Rangel*
10.0% Faulkner
10.1% Other
100%
16
95.4% Serrano*
4.6% Vella
  100%
17
72.1% Engel*
23.5% Mele
4.5% Other
99%
18
62.0% Lowey*
38.0% Russell
  99%
19
47.2% Hall*
52.8% Hayworth
  100%
20
44.6% Murphy*
55.4% Gibson
  100%
21
59.3% Tonko*
40.7% Danz
  100%
22
52.4% Hinchey*
47.6% Phillips
  100%
23
48.1% Owens*
45.8% Doheny
6.0% Other
100%
24
47.1% Arcuri*
52.9% Hanna
  99%
25
49.8% Maffei*
50.2% Buerkle
  100%
26
26.2% Fedele
73.8% Lee*
  99%
27
60.8% Higgins*
39.2% Roberto
  100%
28
65.2% Slaughter*
34.8% Rowland
  100%
29
43.7% Zeller
56.3% Reed
  100%

Major Ballot Measures

Measure   Yes No Reporting
1 Return city term limits to two terms
73.9%
26.1%
100%
2 Variety of administrative changes to city charter
82.7%
17.3%
100%

Attorney General 99% reporting

Candidate Party Votes Pct.  
Eric Schneiderman
Dem. 2,207,728 54.9%  
Dan Donovan
Rep. 1,758,269 43.7%  
Carl Person
Lib. 35,906 0.9%  
Ramon Jimenez
Frdm. 18,053 0.4%  

Comptroller 99% reporting

Candidate Party Votes Pct.  
Thomas DiNapoli
Dem. 2,014,091 49.7% Incumbent
Harry Wilson
Rep. 1,911,884 47.2%  
Julia Willebrand
Green 97,873 2.4%  
John Gaetani
Lib. 27,485 0.7%  
Senate Special Senate Governor House Districts
updated 3:57 PM ET

State Highlights

At first glance, it would be easy to conclude that the national shift toward Republicans barely touched New York. Democrats swept the statewide offices, winning the governorship and both Senate seats by very large margins, and they took at least 21 of the state’s 29 House seats.

But in fact, Republicans took five Congressional districts away from the Democrats, tying New York with Ohio for the biggest shift in House seats. All of the New York districts that switched were traditionally Republican districts that Democrats had captured over the last four years, including some they had little expectation of holding.

Andrew M. Cuomo, the attorney general, won the race for governor by one of the widest margins in history, carrying every region except western New York, the base of his Republican opponent, Carl P. Paladino, a businessman. Mr. Cuomo, a former federal housing secretary, is a son of the former Gov. Mario M. Cuomo.

Mr. Paladino rode a wave of anger and support from Tea Party groups to a surprise victory in the Republican primary. Both major candidates campaigned as reformers who could tackle Albany’s dysfunction and profligate spending, but Mr. Cuomo was the favorite all along, and Mr. Paladino’s prospects faded badly as his missteps and erratic behavior mounted.

Most voters described the weak economy as the top issue, but there was a sharp partisan divide, according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for a consortium of television networks and The Associated Press. Paladino voters were twice as likely as Cuomo voters to say that they were very worried about the economy.

Senator Charles E. Schumer, a Democrat, won a third term by a two-to-one ratio over a little-known challenger, Jay Townsend, a businessman.

The other Senate race was expected to provide some drama, but ended up nearly as lopsided, with Kirsten E. Gillibrand, the Democratic incumbent, easily beating Joseph DioGuardi, a former congressman. Ms. Gillibrand, who was appointed to the seat in 2009, ran statewide for the first time, for the two years remaining on the term won in 2006 by Hillary Rodham Clinton, now the secretary of state.

Democrats will continue to hold every statewide office, as they have for the last four years.

State Senator Eric T. Schneiderman of Manhattan won the race to succeed Mr. Cuomo as attorney general, defeating Daniel M. Donovan Jr., the Staten Island district attorney, by a surprisingly comfortable margin. Their stances reflected a classic partisan divide, with Mr. Schneiderman promising to police Wall Street, and emphasizing his support of abortion rights, while Mr. Donovan stressed crime fighting and his prosecutorial experience.

In the closest statewide race, Thomas P. DiNapoli, the state comptroller, narrowly bested Harry Wilson, a former hedge fund manager. Mr. DiNapoli’s wide lead in the polls evaporated in recent weeks, as voters were reminded of his appointment to the post by the Legislature in 2007, questions were raised about his financial acumen, and Mr. Wilson collected many newspaper endorsements.

In House races, Republicans made their most widely expected gain in western New York, where Thomas Reed won the seat vacated by Eric Massa. The most surprising switch came in a district covering Staten Island and part of Brooklyn, where Representative Michael E. McMahon, a Democrat, lost to Mike Grimm.

Despite facing ethics charges, Representative Charles B. Rangel, a 40-year Democratic incumbent from Manhattan, won a lopsided re-election. The district has so few Republicans that the outcome was almost a foregone conclusion after Mr. Rangel, 80, beat back a primary challenge in September, but Republicans tried to keep attention on him and his troubles to cast doubt on Democrats generally. He is the ranking Democrat on the powerful Ways and Means Committee, and in the new session he will be the third-most-senior House member.

Democrats continued to dominate the State Assembly, but control of the State Senate remained balanced on a knife’s edge. Democrats took a 32-to-30 advantage in 2008, the first time they had held a majority since the 1960s.

As of Wednesday afternoon, Republicans had won 30 seats and Democrats 29, with three still too close to call. If the Senate is tied, 31-to-31, Democrats will retain control, with the new lieutenant governor, Robert J. Duffy, breaking the tie.

Senate control could be essential to directing the redrawing of legislative districts based on this year’s census, a process in which New York is expected to lose two House seats. Mr. Cuomo has said he wants redistricting controlled by a nonpartisan, independent body — an idea that will meet resistance in the Legislature.

RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA