Reviled B.C. serial murderer Clifford Olson can return to torment victims' families every two years

 

'There's nothing that can be done until he's dead'

 
 
 
 
Clifford Olson, pictured here in custody in August 1981, tortured and killed eight boys and three girls between the ages of nine and 18. In 1982 he pleaded guilty to 11 first-degree murder charges and worked out a deal with prosecutors to reveal the location of the bodies in exchange for $10,000 each.
 

Clifford Olson, pictured here in custody in August 1981, tortured and killed eight boys and three girls between the ages of nine and 18. In 1982 he pleaded guilty to 11 first-degree murder charges and worked out a deal with prosecutors to reveal the location of the bodies in exchange for $10,000 each.

Photograph by: Rick Loughran file, PNG

The families of Clifford Olson's victims are bracing for his parole hearing next month.

The Province has learned a hearing is planned for November, likely in Quebec, where Olson is serving a life sentence for killing 11 children in B.C.

Olson, 70, who seems to take pleasure in revictimizing the families of those he killed, is automatically eligible for parole every two years until the day he dies.

Ray King, whose only son was 15 when Olson killed him, plans to be at the parole hearing but said it's difficult facing the prospect of a hearing every two years. "Of course it's hard," he said. "It's hard just hearing [Olson's] name."

King said he'd like to see the rules changed to prevent killers from having regular parole hearings. "I'd like to be able to fly, but that's not going to happen either. There's nothing that can be done until he's dead. I'd be glad if he died."

Sharon Rosenfeldt, whose 16-year-old son Daryn was murdered by Olson in April 1981, said from Montreal that she and her daughter will attend Olson's hearing. "I will be attending parole hearings until Clifford Olson dies or I die," said Rosenfeldt, who attended the last hearing with her daughter in a Montreal-area prison in July 2006. "But it's always been really unsettling to us.

"When Clifford Olson was first sentenced I thought it would be for life. Well, he's been part of our lives for coming up 30 years. It will be 30 years in April that Daryn went missing and was murdered.

"To have to relive this every two years, it's so inhumane. It really is," said Rosenfeldt.

At his 2006 hearing, Olson was denied parole after ranting at the board and making wild claims he had information on the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in the U.S. Before he was taken away, parole officer Nancy Beaudoin said Olson was classified as a high risk to reoffend. "In fact we have reason to believe his murderous behaviour will continue if he is released," she said.

In rejecting parole, board member Jacques Letendre called Olson "a sexual sadist and a narcissist."

Olson has been in prison since 1981, a year after he began his killing spree in Surrey. Olson tortured and killed 11 children -- eight boys and three girls between the ages of nine and 18. In 1982 he plead guilty to 11 first-degree murder charges and worked out a deal with prosecutors to reveal the location of the bodies in exchange for $10,000 each.

"No punishment a civilized country could give you could come close to being adequate . . . You should never be granted parole for the remainder of your day," said the late Justice Harry McKay during sentencing.

Brigitte Kozma Nordin, whose sister Judy was killed by Olson, says the murderer continues to hold sway over the country he first terrorized 30 years ago.

"Every time Clifford Olson is mentioned, I'm devastated," she told The Province in July. "You can never win with this guy. Every time [he] comes up, I get so afraid. I see him in front of me. It's non-stop horror."

The serial killer has the right to waive his parole hearing at any time, as he did two years ago. gluymes@theprovince.com

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Story Tools

 
 
Font:
 
Image:
 
 
 
 
 
Clifford Olson, pictured here in custody in August 1981, tortured and killed eight boys and three girls between the ages of nine and 18. In 1982 he pleaded guilty to 11 first-degree murder charges and worked out a deal with prosecutors to reveal the location of the bodies in exchange for $10,000 each.
 

Clifford Olson, pictured here in custody in August 1981, tortured and killed eight boys and three girls between the ages of nine and 18. In 1982 he pleaded guilty to 11 first-degree murder charges and worked out a deal with prosecutors to reveal the location of the bodies in exchange for $10,000 each.

Photograph by: Rick Loughran file, PNG

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SEND US YOUR VIDEOS

 

 
We're always looking for news, sports, and entertainment footage that you've taken around town, to share with The Province readers. Upload your videos through YouTube, as follows. Thanks!
 
 
 
 
 

Most Popular News

 
 
 
 
 

Breaking News Alert

 
Sign up to receive e-mail alerts on breaking news from The Province.