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December 6, 2010 2:37 PM PST

MasterCard pulls plug on WikiLeaks payments

by Declan McCullagh
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MasterCard is pulling the plug on payments to WikiLeaks, a move that will dry up another source of funds for the embattled document-sharing Web site, CNET has learned.

MasterCard logo

There are some things you can't buy with MasterCard.

"MasterCard is taking action to ensure that WikiLeaks can no longer accept MasterCard-branded products," a spokesman for MasterCard Worldwide said today.

That further limits the revenue sources for WikiLeaks, which has seen its finances systematically attacked in the last few days, as the Swiss authorities shut down a bank account used by editor Julian Assange, and PayPal permanently restricted the account used by the group. WikiLeaks has responded with an increasing number of fund-raising requests that urge supporters to "KEEP US STRONG."

Assuming that MasterCard blocks payments, the only easy way to donate electronically would be with a Visa credit card through a Web page hosted by Iceland-based DataCell.com. Representatives of Visa did not respond to requests for comment from CNET today. (WikiLeaks also solicits payments sent through the U.S. mail.)

MasterCard said it was cutting off payments because WikiLeaks is engaging in illegal activity. "MasterCard rules prohibit customers from directly or indirectly engaging in or facilitating any action that is illegal," spokesman Chris Monteiro said.

The move to cordon off WikiLeaks comes as a noose appears to be tightening around the neck of editor Julian Assange, who is the target of an arrest warrant issued today in the United Kingdom, according to a BBC report. He is expected to appear in a U.K. court tomorrow.

WikiLeaks previously was given the boot from its United States-based hosting services and domain name services. Sen. Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut said last Wednesday: "I call on any other company or organization that is hosting WikiLeaks to immediately terminate its relationship with them."

Since then, U.S. politicians have stepped up their criticism of the document-sharing site, which has posted only about 1,000 of 251,000 State Department dispatches it says it possesses and has shifted to the WikiLeaks.ch domain. "I think the man is a high-tech terrorist," Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said yesterday, referring to Assange. "He has done enormous damage to our country."

In addition, the incoming chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee wants WikiLeaks listed as a "terrorist" organization, which would prohibit U.S. banks from processing payments and make it a felony for anyone else to provide "material support or resources" to the group. CNET reported earlier today that some U.S. government employees are being blocked from visiting WikiLeaks' Web site and the myriad mirror sites that have sprouted in the last few days.

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Declan McCullagh is the chief political correspondent for CNET. Declan previously was a reporter for Time and the Washington bureau chief for Wired and wrote the Taking Liberties section and Other People's Money column for CBS News' Web site.

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by Atofose December 6, 2010 2:47 PM PST
The blueprints of Civil War
Reply to this comment 7 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 3:55 PM PST
Do you know what Civil War is?
14 people like this comment
by solitare_pax December 6, 2010 4:48 PM PST
I suppose Atofose believes it is civil in the fact that they have not sent stormtroopers, assassins and Sith Lords out to eliminate anyone remotely connected to Wikileaks.

Hey, wake up - the chief editor is Australian like Rupert Murdoch, Wikileaks is mostly hosted now on European sites, and they managed to tick off more than enough people by putting even MORE people in harm's way by releasing confidential information.

If you don't understand what confidential is about, I advise you to tell your doctor, dentist and credit card company to release all your embarrassing private information to your Facebook page for all the world to enjoy.
9 people like this comment
by papabaer123 December 6, 2010 5:53 PM PST
In my opinion, if it counts for anything, y'all reading the wrong news. I'm from the Pirate Party who has the legal and just backing by Millions of Voters in my country. We see things quite differently. Please review the following links, which you might find helpful in further assessing what's really at stake here.

Leaked

Microsoft & MSNBC: Leaked: Interpol demands extradiction of Dick Cheney.
http://aol.it/dEPaV1

Foreign contractors hired Afghan 'dancing boys'
http://j.mp/hXNvtV

US manipulated climate accord in Copenhagen
http://j.mp/hGvkw0

US wrote Spain's proposed copyright law
http://bit.ly/epFDf5

BoA sets up lawyer Swat Team to combat wikileaks
http://read.bi/fTfHeg

Assessment: CNN: Times and NYT editors discuss wikileaks
http://bit.ly/gCwn1L

Conspiracy

MSNBC: Assange 'rape' accuser has CIA ties.
http://j.mp/fJl3tJ

Julian Assange & Anna Ardin: The person behind the police complaint identified.
http://j.mp/gJZzy6

Reporters Without Borders condemns the blocking, cyber-attacks and political pressure directed at wikileaks
http://j.mp/ekb2xy

Assessments

Washington Times: Wave goodbye to Internet freedom
http://j.mp/hsukF6

The State Department papers throw light on the seamy side of American diplomacy
http://j.mp/fEWVJo

Assange Delivers On Obama's Promise Of Transparency
http://j.mp/hGoNwV

Like It or Not, WikiLeaks is a Media Entity
http://j.mp/e6hAGM
15 people like this comment
by x181 December 6, 2010 5:53 PM PST
With 200+ web site mirrors, wikileaks is not going away. Now is a better time than ever to stamp out US Government corruption.
9 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 8:08 PM PST
@x181

Please post some examples of "corruption" that WikiLeaks has exposed.
3 people like this comment
by jklank December 7, 2010 4:24 AM PST
@x181 - what "corruption" has been revealed? If you honestly think that no other governments have "secret" documents like the ones Assange and his cronies are releasing, you're sadly mistaken.

He's doing this to stroke his epeen. He had Wikileaks distribute the info, encrypted, because he KNOWS he's messed with the wrong government. Sure, he has no choice but to keep going now....but he's starting to become aware of the consequences of his actions. Soon enough the other known members of Wikileaks will be arrested for posting the stolen info.
4 people like this comment
by kaibelf December 7, 2010 6:06 AM PST
@jklank, what corruption? How about that whole Apache helicopter gunning down journalists and then lying about them being armed terrorists? If your government and military covering up a GROUP MURDER isn't corrupt, I seriously question what you think is acceptable.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1263822/WikiLeaks-video-Reuters-journalists-civilians-gunned-US-pilots.html
5 people like this comment
by Random_Walk December 7, 2010 7:11 AM PST
"With 200+ web site mirrors, wikileaks is not going away"

...until the hosting bills fail to get paid. This is why they're going after the money.

==

As for "Civil War"?

Yeah, right. Back in the real Civil War (ref: 1860-1865), there was a ton of violence preceding it, and a population that was willing to fight and literally die for their opinion on the matters (there were two: slavery and states' rights).

In this particular case, I sincerely doubt that there are people willing to take up arms against anyone... you'd have to peel them away from their Internet pr0n and XBoxes first.
4 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 7, 2010 8:45 AM PST
@kaibelf

That video was a while back and It was revealed way before the Iraq War logs release or the diplomatic cables release.

We're talking about what "corruption' has been revealed from the diplomatic cables.
3 people like this comment
by kaibelf December 7, 2010 1:11 PM PST
@ anonCNET, the same arguments were used back then (SO far back - what was it? 6 months?) As for the new document drops? How about spying on diplomats, and collecting their DNA? Not corrupt, considering the big deal we make about being so different from Cold War USSR-style actions?
2 people like this comment
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by Pete Bardo December 6, 2010 3:00 PM PST
"MasterCard rules prohibit customers from directly or indirectly engaging in or facilitating any action that is illegal," spokesman Chris Monteiro said. Chris had better think again. It's not at all clear the site or its owner have actually done anything illegal. Amazing how many people are willing to jump on the band wagon to hang Assange. And to classify Wikileaks as a Terrorist Organization gives a whole new meaning to terrorist.

What's worse: US diplomats behaving badly or Wikileaks exposing the bad behavior?
Reply to this comment 23 people like this comment
by Adam-M December 6, 2010 3:03 PM PST
What is behaving badly in this latest batch of leaks?

Spying which every other country already does?
7 people like this comment
by gerrrg December 6, 2010 3:28 PM PST
You must have missed the story today about one of the cables that was released: a list of sites around the world that the US considered important to the security of America; a veritable hit list for Al Qaeda.

I don't particularly see how you can apply your sweeping generalization to a data dump.
13 people like this comment
by assman December 6, 2010 3:34 PM PST
Still think Wikileaks are the good guys?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-11923766
18 people like this comment
by eswinson December 6, 2010 3:55 PM PST
So would MasterCard be indirectly facilitating illegal activity themselves? I would imagine 99% of their merchants have indirectly facilitated illegal activity. How many stolen credit cards are used to buy stuff on a daily basis? How many credit cards are used to buy guns that are used in crimes?... etc.. etc..
5 people like this comment
by NegreMuerte December 6, 2010 3:57 PM PST
Sadly, this is the death knell for ever again outing the government or its actions. This drive, with lib media and mafia politicians, to shut down Assange and WL only goes to show that the truth will never be allowed to be spoken, and that while illegal bankers can take billions, even trillions from the public without penalty, WL cannot merely print the truth of what evils that our politicians and other politicians have done. How dare anyone out the lies? Easy, big power talks to big banking and says, 'shut him down before he says too much'. Guess we now see that the little guy is only an ant, after all. Stop trying to say anything revolutionary or important or true, you will be crucified for it publicly if you try.
6 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 4:16 PM PST
@NegreMuerte

Posting a list of sites critical to the US economy and infrastructure, that if targeted by terrorists could do serious damage is NOT "printing the evils" of politicians, etc. It is outright dangerous and could potentially affect all of us severely if anything happened to such sites.
4 people like this comment
by eswinson December 6, 2010 4:42 PM PST
@anonCNET It is a list of potential targets not much different than many of the lists the media has compiled and published on its own over the last 9 years. You have to realize this is diplomatic level stuff. We expect our embassies to be compromised (bugged, spied on by compromised local workers, hacked, etc.) We don't generally put real military and specific threat level intelligence in the hands of people that are generally appointed to their posts by the president as favors to his political supporters. The CIA/NSA/FBI/DOD is very careful about what it lets circulate in the hands of diplomats especially when they are the source of many of the leaks to begin with.
4 people like this comment
by ReVeLaTeD December 6, 2010 4:42 PM PST
"You must have missed the story today about one of the cables that was released: a list of sites around the world that the US considered important to the security of America; a veritable hit list for Al Qaeda."

It appears some do not understand the terrorist mind. Here's a scary fact: terrorists already KNOW what targets to hit. The key is when they choose to hit them and the reason(s) for doing so. Did you know that most of the terrorist behavior that happens now is a result of us not pulling out of the conflict?
5 people like this comment
by Adam-M December 6, 2010 6:23 PM PST
@ReVeLaTeD

Is that not how every conflict goes? The opposing party gets more violent until one gives up. This is war 101. Just because they offer resistance doesn't mean you pack up your **** and go home.
1 person likes this comment
by Lerianis4 December 6, 2010 7:59 PM PST
I think that Wikileaks should sue Mastercard over this. They are doing NOTHING that the New York Times and various other newspapers and organizations have done over the years. The only difference is the sheer staggering amounts of information that have been leaked to Wikileaks.... which, by the way, most of it is UNclassifed stuff, better than 80% in fact.
3 people like this comment
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by Conspiracy2Riot December 6, 2010 3:06 PM PST
*** is this....they are one by one closing/freezing his monies while ensuring most likely he will not be able to make bail and be taken into custody is what it looks like to me.

This country deserves to be shredded. I read a blog about the real revolution involving more than just peaceful protest....evidently we need to organize against the corporations assisting the US in their obvious witch hunt.

No matter what happens to Assange the truth is coming out and they've created a whole new base of enemies both foreign and domestic that will wreak havoc in this system as best as possible.
Reply to this comment 9 people like this comment
by Random_Walk December 7, 2010 7:17 AM PST
Until you stop posting ersatz philosophy and start actually doing something to change the world to suit your ideal, I'll continue to not believe you'll do anything more than the vast majority of those calling for violent action...

...there's a world of difference between talking and doing. With real terrorists, at least they're willing to actually perform an act, no matter how despicable. You and your like OTOH can't be arsed to put down your television remote and keyboard, so I doubt anything will ever happen.

As for "the truth"? Feh - you have no idea what the truth is, especially if you're relying on one side's presentation of massaged fact to base your arguments on.
7 people like this comment
by Random_Walk December 7, 2010 7:17 AM PST
Until you stop posting ersatz philosophy and start actually doing something to change the world to suit your ideal, I'll continue to not believe you'll do anything more than the vast majority of those calling for violent action...

...there's a world of difference between talking and doing. With real terrorists, at least they're willing to actually perform an act, no matter how despicable. You and your like OTOH can't be arsed to put down your television remote and keyboard, so I doubt anything will ever happen.

As for "the truth"? Feh - you have no idea what the truth is, especially if you're relying on one side's presentation of massaged fact to base your arguments on.
1 person likes this comment
by Atofose December 7, 2010 9:20 AM PST
Same could be said about you random.. you think you know everything but your just an iggnorant e thug. keep your critisim to yourself. Your always on Cnet posting replies like you know everything which you problly dont.
by Random_Walk December 7, 2010 10:47 AM PST
I'm not the one demanding revolution, nor am I crying for anyone to charge the barricades... now am I?
2 people like this comment
by sxpert December 6, 2010 3:13 PM PST
anyone with a Mastercard, time to go see your financial institution to get rid of it.
Reply to this comment 19 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 3:46 PM PST
Why?
14 people like this comment
by zmonster December 6, 2010 5:11 PM PST
Done.
2 people like this comment
by Random_Walk December 7, 2010 7:19 AM PST
Hint: Visa and Amex are either not far behind, or won't/don't deal with 'em. Since nobody takes Discover...


...I guess you'll be doing cash only and checks from now on, then?
3 people like this comment
by ddpalmer December 7, 2010 10:18 AM PST
Latest news is VISA has locked them out also.
2 people like this comment
by Pac-Man- December 6, 2010 3:13 PM PST
Wait a sec! What exactly is illegal? The fact that they are posting documents that were "given" to them by whistle blowers regarding some govt **** ups? What happened to the freedom of the press? Oh boy!! I think this is gonna hit Master card hard as a damn lawsuit. Once the storm about the cables cool down, Assange is gonna come back hard and sue Master card...Looks pretty clear cut to me.
Reply to this comment 10 people like this comment
by EducatedPanther December 6, 2010 3:50 PM PST
They also state they can cancel services for any reason they see fit. It is their business, they can do what they want (as long as it isn't illegal - such as not lending to certain ethnic groups but lending to others, etc). It is people like you that make this country a pain to live in...ooh I don't agree, so I'm gonna sue!

And secondly this is not about freedom of press. He is not a reporter... he is disclosing state secrets (granted, some of them humorously embarrassing) that were stolen, yes, STOLEN, from government computers by an idiot with no morals, who should be tried for treason.

At least with the last release, he redacted most, or at least made a seemingly honest effort to, of the critical names and places that could be used to locate and kill our allies and/or troops...
12 people like this comment
by johnqh December 6, 2010 3:54 PM PST
It is illegal even with the old and weak copyright laws.
by LilMissTechie December 6, 2010 4:13 PM PST
@EducatedPanther

Thank you for your post. I find it really sad how many people are crying "free speech" and "freedom of the press" and don't even understand what it means. I agree with everything you said.
4 people like this comment
by Lerianis4 December 6, 2010 8:02 PM PST
EducatedPanther, he is just as much a reporter as someone for the New York Times. Anyone who is giving us NEWS and INFORMATION (which Wikileaks is doing) fits in most people's idea of a reporter.
3 people like this comment
by ckh1272 December 7, 2010 2:28 AM PST
@Lerianis4--They are not reporters. Even the reporters are not reporters anymore. They (Assange and Co.) are anarchists selling their wares to the highest bidder. Assange is about as much of a reporter as me or you. Besides, given the sheer scope of these leaks, any other reporter would face the same consequences. The "whistle blower" (traitor) is really going to feel the hammer fall.
by kaibelf December 7, 2010 6:02 AM PST
Blah blah blah anarchists selling to the highest bidder? I didn't pay a thing and am now privy to my government spying illegally and covering up murder. And thank god I know about it. Do i want civilization to fall? No, but I'd be a moron to not want to know what's being done in my name with my tax money.
1 person likes this comment
by icebear79 December 6, 2010 3:18 PM PST
This is amazing, Wikileaks have not been charged for any crime, how can those company justify those actions?

This is turning out to be a war between government and corporations against the public.

In my opinion have the actions taken by US government made America look thousand times worse then those cables have done.

Shameful actions, already dropped paypal, amazong and tomorrow I will hand in my Maestro card.
Reply to this comment 20 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 3:54 PM PST
I side with my country.
10 people like this comment
by EducatedPanther December 6, 2010 3:55 PM PST
They don't have to be charged... haven't you read any customer agreements? They almost always say they can terminate service for any reason they so desire. They are a business, it is in their interest to protect themselves from bad publicity. In this case, indirectly helping a thief.

They are well within their rights. Oh, and by the way, in case you missed it, from what I have read, he didn't even redact critical information this time, which could be used by our enemies to find and kill our allies/troops. At least he appeared to make an honest attempt last time.

Yeah, that's a cause worth supporting... (sarcasm in case you don't get it)
9 people like this comment
by 0ri0n December 6, 2010 4:34 PM PST
@anonCNET - Side with your country....

1.) When it hands the power of imminent domain to any developer who wants your property.
2.) When it conducts illegal wiretaps through AT&T, and then creates laws to retroactively excuse them - after they are busted.
3.) When it creates a NEW security department, rather than modifying any of the existing ones, with broad laws to corral the citizens of this country as potential terrorists.
4.) While one political party tries to cry "because not enough has been done" in two years, after their champion as president ground this nation down for 8 years - playing the public like puppets.
5.) While your country continues to endure the damage of the 'trickle down theory'.
6.) While laws are enacted to erode your rights in favor or corporate interests and democracy dissolves into a Big-money-backed good ol' boy system.

Go ahead, stand with your country in blind obedience; the Germans, Russians, Iraqis and Chinese did the same thing....while liberty dies.
12 people like this comment
by fumastercard December 6, 2010 5:16 PM PST
i had an acccount with amazon (HAD) and i personaly have influenced at least ?700 pounds away from them by their actions i just hope many more pounds or dollars are taken away from such a low life company that fought for a pedophiles handbook to be allowed to be sold by them SHAME ON YOU AMAZON
1 person likes this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 5:47 PM PST
Why do you assume I'm blindly siding with my country?
1 person likes this comment
by 0ri0n December 6, 2010 7:09 PM PST
@anonCNET - Perhaps because you don't defend your position, maybe you would rather not or can not but, in any case simply do not? Simply stating you 'stand by your country' doesn't really say that you stand by your government.

So, how DO you stand by your country? Right or wrong? Or simply take up space like so much debris on the sea?
4 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 7, 2010 1:05 AM PST
@0ri0n

To be honest, I hate political debates so it's surprising to me even that I got so caught up in commenting in this thread. I'm not a politics fan. I like tech stuff which is why I come to the site.

To be brief, because I could go on and on, I don't like the way WikiLeaks is doing things. I see them as an organization that started out as a group dedicated to "revealing the wrong" and has become an organization dedicated towards targeting the US without real purpose. Yes, some of the cables have been insightful, but none of them have revealed significant wrong doing - only not-that-surprising or wrong backroom occurrences. I even consider some of the releases downright reckless (when they don't take time to redact names, etc. - something many of the resigned WikiLeaks boardmembers agree with) and others downright dangerous (such as the list of vital US sites).

What is the purpose of revealing vital US sites. It exposes absolutely no wrongdoing of any kind, something Wikleaks is supposedly dedicated to. While no harm may come of it (since many locations, though not all, are somewhat obvious), certainly no good will come of it. It is examples like this, more than other kinds of documents, that really make me think WikiLeak's main goal is to hurt the US (thus my comment) as opposed to revealing wrong doings.
1 person likes this comment
by ckh1272 December 7, 2010 2:31 AM PST
@0ri0n--If you think somehow the Dems are not money grubbing, clearly you have not been paying attention (which is exactly what they want). It's called political slight of hand. By all means though, continue on the path to ignorance.
by Sleep Dawg December 7, 2010 4:04 AM PST
You are correct. Corporations will always justify their actions as a right to do business. People can choose <except in the case of health care> not to be forced to do business with them, they say.

The problem starts when governments become the enforcers of corporate will. That is the textbook definition of fascism, of course. You're now seeing the symbiotic relationship harshly exposed once again.

Your choices are decided for you. What you can or cannot read (easily) on the Internet is censored for you, by calling it "illegal". Of course, it makes no difference if the information is hosted elsewhere and published by non-Americans. The current (and previous Bush) government believes that if you view it in the US, they have jurisdiction. It makes their propaganda efforts easier inside your country, and keeps the populace obedient in the face of murderous wars and deleterious gouging of the financial system.

They learned their lessons well from the Nazis they protected after WW2.
by kaibelf December 7, 2010 7:12 AM PST
@anonCNET, you're saying that Wikileaks isn't revealing wrongs by showing that the USA covered up the gunning down of civilians? How is that a political debate? If ANYTHING, the people who are covering up these murders (and that's EXACTLY what they are) belong in the Hague.

And EducatedPanther, why exactly are our troops' lives supposed to be more valuable than the lives of the civilians killed and then covered up? Are you really so arrogant as to say that America can do no wrong EVER, and are the kings of the world, even to the extent that we should be allowed to charge foreign citizens outside of our borders with our local laws and kill foreigners with impunity? We didn't annex the entire earth last time I looked at a map. If we are hurting over the truth, so be it. It's our OWN fault for running a filthy operation.
1 person likes this comment
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by infernoskating December 6, 2010 3:24 PM PST
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution
Reply to this comment 5 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 3:47 PM PST
...applies to a foreign organization how?
7 people like this comment
by icebear79 December 6, 2010 3:58 PM PST
Guess it applies because he US would trial him, and in US courts US laws apply.
2 people like this comment
by EducatedPanther December 6, 2010 4:00 PM PST
The first amendment doesn't even apply.

1: He is not a US citizen
2: He is releasing classified, sensitive information (some of it amusingly embarrassing, admittedly), that was STOLEN from US computers, by a US Citizen, who should be tried for treason.
3: Releasing classified documents that put real peoples lives in danger, is not journalism or news reporting. He is not a reporter by any stretch of the means. He is many things, but reporter/journalist is not one of them.
7 people like this comment
by Adam-M December 6, 2010 6:25 PM PST
I love this the same people who say he doesn't have to abide by US laws is protected by US freedoms LMFAO.
1 person likes this comment
by Lerianis4 December 6, 2010 8:04 PM PST
Sorry, EducatedPanther, but any FOREIGN citizen in our country has the right to be protected under our Constitution. The Supreme Court settled that issue YEARS AND YEARS ago, and said that anyone brought to this country and tried on United States soil is protected by our Constitution.
6 people like this comment
by JayJayD December 6, 2010 8:39 PM PST
@Adam-M: Because the Constitution doesn't *grant* freedoms to US citizens--those are presumed (9th Amendment). It *withholds* freedoms from the government. The 1st Amendment begins, "Congress shall make no law." It doesn't matter if a case involves the US vs. a US citizen or the US vs. a foreign national. The restrictions on the government are the same.
6 people like this comment
by ddpalmer December 7, 2010 4:04 AM PST
Sorry Lerianis4 but he is not in the US now is he? So how can anybody expect the US Constitution to offer him any protection? If he were brought to the US that would change but the only charges actually filed against him that I know of are from Sweden, which in case you didn't know is not part of the US.
1 person likes this comment
by kaibelf December 7, 2010 1:24 PM PST
He's not a US citizen, and he didn't do any of this on US soil. This can't be tried any more than I can be tried in China for taking a dump on a picture of Chairman Mao in Chicago. That's jurisdiction.

Also, he released this information to the media. Does that mean we start arresting the editors of the New York Times, Der Spiegel, and The UK Guardian too?
2 people like this comment
by kaibelf December 7, 2010 1:24 PM PST
He's not a US citizen, and he didn't do any of this on US soil. This can't be tried any more than I can be tried in China for taking a dump on a picture of Chairman Mao in Chicago. That's jurisdiction.

Also, he released this information to the media. Does that mean we start arresting the editors of the New York Times, Der Spiegel, and The UK Guardian too?
by anonCNET December 7, 2010 6:32 PM PST
@kaibelf

He did store stolen classified documents on American servers at one point.
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by n3td3v December 6, 2010 3:38 PM PST
US Government stops funding to CIA-sponsored web site, Wikileaks.

Psychological Operations (United States)

"Psychological operations are planned operations to convey selected information and indicators to foreign audiences to influence their emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and ultimately the behaviour of foreign governments, organisations, groups, and individuals."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_Operations_%28United_States%29
Reply to this comment 5 people like this comment
by dumbspammers December 6, 2010 3:50 PM PST
You're keeping Alcoa in business. Time to change the hat!
5 people like this comment
by n3td3v December 6, 2010 4:35 PM PST
CIA are using Wikileaks as a pre-text for US Military to start a new war, similar to the "dodgy dossier" that was the pre-text to invade Iraq in United Kingdom.

Insurance file key to be released to provoke a war with the United States that the US Government want to have.

What we are seeing at the moment is the groundwork for a reason to preemptive military attack another country.

The details of the country US want to attack will come clear as soon as more leaks are released by CIA via Wikileaks.
4 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 8:09 PM PST
A war with whom?
7 people like this comment
by ckh1272 December 7, 2010 2:33 AM PST
Ah, the tinfoil hat spammer has returned.
2 people like this comment
by Atofose December 7, 2010 9:32 AM PST
LOL N3 is back! yes this is the BS i knew he had locked inside of him... you make a great BS artist!
by dumbspammers December 6, 2010 3:49 PM PST
There's no way all these things are happening without Government pressure.
Reply to this comment 10 people like this comment
by Lerianis4 December 6, 2010 8:05 PM PST
Exactly. Personally, if I find out that ANY Senator, Representative, etc. is involved in this or put ANY pressure on Amazon, Mastercard, PayPal, etc...... arrest the bastards, because they are abusing the power of their office.
by drfillgood December 6, 2010 9:19 PM PST
@Lerianis4
But you'll never find out who if those Senators, Representatives, etc are successful in turning whistleblowers into "terrorists". Seems to me like the real terrorists are the elected government officials that are trying to squash the truth. Maybe they should start being called the "elected terrorists".
5 people like this comment
by eswinson December 6, 2010 3:56 PM PST
it's just starting to get silly now.
Reply to this comment 2 people like this comment
by sismoc December 6, 2010 4:00 PM PST
First the Swiss police, then Paypal, next a Swiss bank, now MasterCard. The long arm of the CIA has certainly frightened quite a few people!

Go, WikiLeaks, Go!!!
Reply to this comment 7 people like this comment
by dieselmachine December 6, 2010 8:49 PM PST
This is the unveiling, when we see where each company stands. Many of them will turn on you in a second, few will actually respect the rights of their users. Amazon, EveryDNS, Paypal, Mastercard, have all shown us where they stand, and they need to suffer for it financially. Companies are showing their allegiance. If the company chooses money over rights, they need to be dropped.

Although, using paypal? they've been stealing peoples' money for years, I can't believe wikileaks trusted them with any money at all, much less 60 grand. Paypal = crooks, period. This is common knowledge by now. How did he miss that?
by eswinson December 6, 2010 4:28 PM PST
Osama can hang a big "Mission Accomplished" banner up in his cave and take the next several years off. If there is never even another terrorist attack for the rest our lives it won't matter. We will pick ourselves in to oblivion in the name of what could happen. Every crime no matter how big or small is terrorism. Every act is now potential terrorism no matter how benign. It used to be Communists now it is terrorist... I guess tomorrow it will be journalists.

Assange may very well be a jerk. He may be parading around with some of our dirty laundry like some kid that just found his sister's diary. But he is not public enemy number 1. He hasn't killed anybody. He hasn't started a war, all he as done is embarrass a bunch of people and left us with a bunch of curious questions to ask of our leaders. Though we have conjured up all these hypothetical turn of events that turn him into Hitler and have decided to start attacking our very own civil rights in order to punish someone that is not even affected by them to begin with.
Reply to this comment 12 people like this comment
by krosafcheg December 6, 2010 8:59 PM PST
FINALLY! Someone posting with some logic. Amen.
5 people like this comment
by makardhwaj December 7, 2010 12:30 PM PST
Strong post.
by nixermac December 6, 2010 4:31 PM PST
I have been pretty neutral with WikiLeaks and have not seen any strong reason to criticize them but the latest salvo of detailing important facilities around the world is sheer stupidity. I do not think that this information should have been released. The info is not some stupidity of politicians but real critical installations around the world that help the common peoples.

WikiLeaks should understand and be responsible in what they do.

To let you all know, I believe in the Fourth Estate. It is stronger than governments and has the power to change and being a power has responsibilities. While publishing these docs, WikiLeaks has foregone the right to be a member of the Fourth Estate.
Reply to this comment 2 people like this comment
by Lerianis4 December 6, 2010 8:06 PM PST
You are forgetting that you could get this SAME EXACT INFORMATION from other sites other than Wikileaks, idiot. In fact, you could go to Google Maps and get most of this information.
by ckh1272 December 7, 2010 2:36 AM PST
@Lerianis4-If that is the case, then why would WikiLeaks bother releasing info. that is already available? Why would they need a "whistleblower" to hand over info. that is already available on the web? Your logic is flawed beyond belief.
1 person likes this comment
by Ilgustavo December 6, 2010 4:45 PM PST
With Google and a half an hour, I could draw up a long list of sensible targets for terrorists / foreign military.

Good point about the mountains of money MasterCard makes when people use them to buy handguns.

Assange has leaked nothing. He has published materials which have been leaked to him. If your Gubmints wants to get serious about going after leakers, they have a much, much more difficult job ahead of them.

Besides: the genie is out of the bottle. Tomorrow or next week there will be 100 or 1000 Wikileaks.
Reply to this comment 9 people like this comment
by Ilgustavo December 6, 2010 4:55 PM PST
P.S. I urge MasterCard employees to leak a list of known unfriendly regimes who routinely use MasterCard services in the purchases of weapons, communications, etc., in support of criminal and / or terrorist organizations.
8 people like this comment
by ckh1272 December 7, 2010 2:39 AM PST
IIgustavo says, "Assange has leaked nothing. He has published materials which have been leaked to him. If your Gubmints wants to get serious about going after leakers, they have a much, much more difficult job ahead of them."

Based on that "logic" middle man drug dealers should not be arrested and tried. After all, they are just dealing drugs that were dealt to them. The way WikiLeaks works is no different. This info. was not given to them for free, I promise you.
2 people like this comment
by ddpalmer December 7, 2010 4:08 AM PST
"With Google and a half an hour, I could draw up a long list of sensible targets for terrorists / foreign military."

Well good for you. But the list released is of sites the US government believes are vital, not what Ilgustavo believes are vital. And despite your vast knowledge and experience you don't know what or why the US may believe certain facilities are vital.
2 people like this comment
by fumastercard December 6, 2010 5:06 PM PST
i dont have much of a credit limit with my cards around ?1000 but they are maxed but not for long though bye mastercard youve been a diss service to freedom of information thanks for helping me decide who gets paid off first pitty i dont owe you enough to go for sequistration i hope visa dont do the same or sequistration might still happen lol
Reply to this comment
by zmonster December 6, 2010 5:09 PM PST
We stand with you Wikileaks. You have provided the public with a foolproof method to hold government accountable. Over one million people have joined Wikileaks Facebook page, and people from all over the world are united. The secrecy that separates us, allows corruption to exist, and allows wars to be manufactured is now coming to an end. The free flow of information is the path to peace.
Reply to this comment 9 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 5:48 PM PST
Speak for yourself and don't say "we". It implies everyone.
6 people like this comment
by Lerianis4 December 6, 2010 8:07 PM PST
anonCNET, most people who I have talked with online and in real life ARE on the side of Wikileaks once I bring up the fact that the New York Times did things similar to this in the Watergate scandal and with the Pentagon papers.
by krosafcheg December 6, 2010 9:00 PM PST
anonCNET is clearly a 1st year staff for both the NRA and RNC.
1 person likes this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 9:48 PM PST
@Lerianis4
Still "most people" does not mean all.

@krosafcheg
I don't associate with either political party, but I usually tend to vote democrat.
Also NRA? I'm not sure where that one is coming from...
7 people like this comment
by anonCNET December 6, 2010 9:48 PM PST
@Lerianis4
Still "most people" does not mean all.

@krosafcheg
I don't associate with either political party, but I usually tend to vote democrat.
Also NRA? I'm not sure where that one is coming from...
1 person likes this comment
by coldReactive December 6, 2010 5:14 PM PST
Looks like MasterCard's going to get DDoS next too. :D
Reply to this comment 4 people like this comment
by fumastercard December 6, 2010 5:26 PM PST
LOOKS LIKE MY REPLY GOT DELETED WELL HERE GOES AGAIN I MENTIONED ABOUT AMAZON FOUGHT FOR THE RIGHT TO SELL A PEEEDDOFFFILES HANDBOOK BUT KICKED WIKILEAKS OFF FOR NOT STICKING TO TERMS AND CONDITIONS AMAZON NEEDS SHUTTING DOWN TOOO THERE JUST PUPPETS OF A MORE CORRUPT GOVERNMENT THAN WE MAY EVER KNOW
Reply to this comment 3 people like this comment
by MaggieKilt December 6, 2010 5:38 PM PST
gerrrg December 6, 2010 3:28 PM PST

The sites around the world? Oh, like America is the world, right?

Sorry, but anyone can take a wee walk down the streets of Edinurgh and find that 'strategic' site. But hey, it's not our problem, this isn't Scotland anymore, just a non-voting possession of the US.

Shall we assume the comms cable around coastal UK were installed by your CIA, rather than UK comms engineers?

Gee, and you guys are always complaining about how 'foreigners' don't like you. Helloooooo.

Go build your own submarine toys rather than expecting us Scots to do it for you if you don't like the fact that this is not your country! Scotland is strategically important to the people of Scotland and the people of the British Isles. Full stop.

Untangle your knickers like a good boy. Wipe your nose, stop snivelling, grow up and use those neurons you have as a result of evolution through the millenia. You might just discover that even the terrorists, with their neurons are familiar with complex tools such as the phone book, and google maps too!
Reply to this comment 6 people like this comment
by fumastercard December 6, 2010 5:42 PM PST
GO MAGGIE GO couldnt have said it better myself from a fellow scott
by dieselmachine December 6, 2010 8:54 PM PST
Not all of us complain about foreigners not liking us. Some of us are perfectly aware of the absolutely ****** human beings produced by this country, and are reviled by the same misanthropic tendencies that you are.
by Jonathan December 6, 2010 5:52 PM PST
Good. This has NOTHING, not a ******* thing to do about freedom of speech. Nor does it have anything to do with bringing down a corrupt government.What was leaked most like has or will cost intelligence sources their lives. It pinpoints methods of directly and indirectly attacking america from something as minor as destroying the location that produces smallpox vaccines to mines were we get moderately rare elements. Call it what you will but this is an informational attack on the US.
Reply to this comment 1 person likes this comment
by donttouchmyjunk December 6, 2010 7:17 PM PST
http://projects.washingtonpost.com/top-secret-america/

another i.di.ot
4 people like this comment
by Futura10 December 6, 2010 7:35 PM PST
It would be rather limited for the US to get small pox vaccine from only one place in Holland, which it can neither control nor protect, or to think that the US can single handedly protect a Russian gas pipeline and that the Russians don't have a bigger reason to protect that gas pipeline. Nor can they force the Russians to make that gas available if the Russians decide otherwise. The US doesn't have ownership of a cobalt mine in Congo. Congo does. To think that this list is in any way attractive for terrorists is to forget that these sites are not in the US or US controlled. Instead it bears some questions how the US could possibly designate other nations' property as vital US security interest. It implies that the US would give itself a right to start a war against any nation who owns such a US security site and decides to use it contrary to US desires. I dispute such a US right. But that possibility is certainly the reason why the world fears and hates the US.

To publish that list is genuine journalism - namely to show the thinking of the last superpower and the danger that cooperation in science, mining etc. can bring to other nations.
4 people like this comment
by Lerianis4 December 6, 2010 8:08 PM PST
No, it isn't Jonathan, and thank you.... I just reported you to the FBI for incitement to murder.
2 people like this comment
by kaibelf December 7, 2010 2:11 PM PST
Amazing, I wasn't aware that people in the US were the only ones with Google access and common sense. These aren't hidden bunkers. Shall they outlaw Encyclopedia Brittanica next since it might give me insight into where Fort Knox is?
by expose-government December 7, 2010 3:19 PM PST
Hallelujah! Jonathan. America NEEDS to be attacked with this kind of information. Most people have forgotten that this is a government OF the PEOPLE, BY the PEOPLE and for the people -- not a government of the POLITICIANS AND THEIR HIDDEN AGENDAS! Whatever the cost, Americans who believe in the TRUTH and FULL PURPOSE upon which America was founded need to TAKE BACK AMERICA FROM THE POLITICIANS and put the country back into the hands of honest people who believe in the American principles.
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