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This guide is based on the style book which is given to all journalists at The Economist. (See also our Johnson columns.)


Introduction
Metaphors
Short words
Unnecessary words
Active, not passive
Jargon
Tone
Journalese and slang
Americanisms
Syntax
Some dos and don'ts
Some common solecisms
Abbreviations
Accents
Capitals
People
Organisations, acts, etc
Places
Political terms
Historical periods
Trade names
Euro-terms
e-expressions
Miscellaneous (Upper case)
Miscellaneous (Lower case)
Figures
Hyphens

The write stuff

Have you got it? Take a quiz based on The Economist's Style Guide... more
Italics
Plurals
Punctuation
Apostrophes
Brackets
Colons
Commas
Dashes
Full stops
Inverted commas
Question-marks
Semi-colons
Singular or plural?
Spelling
Common problems
Miscellaneous
People
Places
Titles

THE STYLE BOOK WAS WRITTEN BY JOHN GRIMOND.

An expanded hardback version of The Economist Style Guide, with a special section on American and British English, a 64-page fact checker and glossary, and more is available from our online shop. Buy it today.



More about...

Language

Websites

George Orwell's six elementary rules of writing are outlined in “Politics and the English Language”. (A biography and more essays by Orwell are available here.) Xrefer and Bartleby offer free access to dictionaries, style guides, thesauri and encylopedias. The English-to-American Dictionary, the Dictionary of American and British Usage, and United Kingdom English for the American Novice explain the differences between American and British English.

Click to buy from Amazon.co.uk: “A Dictionary of Modern English Usage”, by H.W. Fowler (Amazon.com); “The Complete Plain Words”, by Sir Ernest Gowers.

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