Two images on the main page show roofers atop a historic house at twilight. Photo: NPS files. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior National Park Service arrowhead with a link to ParkNet
The National Park Service, Heritage Preservation Services, presents an informational program--WORKING ON THE PAST IN LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICTS
Section 'a' content:
THE STRENGTHS OF LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICTS
Section 'b' content:
THE LOCAL PRESERVATION ORDINANCE
Section 'c' content:
LOCAL DESIGN GUIDELINES
Section 'd' content:
CHOOSING THE MOST APPROPRIATE TREATMENT
Section 'e' content:
COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS
a. What are the STRENGTHS of becoming a local historic district?
b. What is a LOCAL PRESERVATION ORDINANCE?
c. What are LOCAL DESIGN GUIDELINES and how to develop them? 
d. What TREATMENT is best for a historic property?
e. What QUESTIONS about historic districts are commonly asked?

DESIGNED FOR
- historic property owners
- new members of district commissions
- community officials
- design professionals
- architects and developers


Bringing preservation “home"
What do some 2,300 local historic districts have in common? In each one, a majority of its residents have decided they want to keep the look and feel of the place they call “home” by adopting a local preservation ordinance, then creating a local preservation commission to administer it. Local legislation is one of the best ways to protect the historic character of buildings, streetscapes, neighborhoods, and special landmarks from inappropriate alterations, new construction, and other poorly conceived work, as well as outright demolition.

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