Apple new subscription rules now upsetting developers, too

Apple new subscription rules now upsetting developers, too

Some developers are being frustrated by Apple's strict rules regarding access to subscription-based content and services via iOS apps, including those behind native versions of Readability and TinyGrab.

iPhone versus iPhone: Ars puts Verizon and AT&T to the test

iPhone versus iPhone: Ars puts Verizon and AT&T to the test
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Verizon versus AT&T: if you were to buy an iPhone today, which network would you choose? Ars did a plethora of real-world tests to compare the data network speeds and voice calls against each other, with bonus WiFi hotspot and battery testing.

Why I care about tablets: iPad offers huge opportunities for competition

Why I care about tablets: iPad offers huge opportunities for competition

Jon Stokes told us why new tablets don't get his blood pumping. Today, we look at what the iPad does better than anything else, and why the next generation of tablets will only make things better.

Canadians continue to rage against metered billing

Canadians continue to rage against metered billing

Judging from the comments streaming into Canada's broadband regulator, Canadians feel distinctly burned by the agency's now suspended decision to allow that country's top ISPs to charge smaller competitors on a metered basis. Looks like it's going to be a while before consumers trust the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission again.

Empty suit: the chaotic way Anonymous makes decisions

Empty suit: the chaotic way Anonymous makes decisions

In a group that claims to have no leaders, it can be impossible to know when "official" pronouncements are made. As the recent troll war between Anonymous and the Westboro Baptist Church shows, this can be a real weakness for the freewheeling hackers. But it's also a source of strength.

New MacBooks seem imminent, may feature Light Peak tech

New MacBooks seem imminent, may feature Light Peak tech

A Sandy Bridge update to Apple's MacBook Pro line could launch this week, and they may be the first Apple computers to include Intel's 10Gb/s Light Peak connector technology. Ars wraps up the rumors about an imminent MacBook Pro update.

Donations pour in for PS3 hacker; Sony court battle continues

Donations pour in for PS3 hacker; Sony court battle continues

Fighting Sony in court will be a long, hard battle, but hacker George Hotz has raised enough money from donations to keep fighting. Friends with deep pockets, media attention, and rapping skills: this fight could be exciting to watch.

Positrons at center of recent anti-progress in matter research

Positrons at center of recent anti-progress in matter research

In a universe dominated by matter, how does one create, store, and study antimatter? Ars sat in on a symposium at AAAS 2011 discussing these very topics. Here we focus on researchers working on the simple positron.

Windows Phone 7 update updates updater

Microsoft has shipped its first Windows Phone 7 update—but not the one we were hoping for.

"OtherOS" class-action lawsuit: GeoHot, Sony now share same charge

Sony's "OtherOS" class-action lawsuit continues, with interesting arguments being made on both sides. Only one claim remains, and it's the same one Sony is using against the man accused of jailbreaking the PlayStation 3.

Black ops: how HBGary wrote backdoors for the government

Black ops: how HBGary wrote backdoors for the government
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The attacks last week by Anonymous on security firm HBGary have yanked back the curtain on the dark world of government-sponsored malware. Where does the US military get its custom rootkits? It buys them—and the 0-day exploits that deliver them—from private security firms.

Windows Phone Marketplace bans the GPL, and the App Store should too

Windows Phone Marketplace bans the GPL, and the App Store should too

A developer has finally noticed a condition tucked away in Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 Marketplace developer agreement: it bans GPL-licensed software. Apple's App Store doesn't. But it should.

A step closer to Skynet? Pentagon wants fighting robots to talk to each other

A step closer to Skynet? Pentagon wants fighting robots to talk to each other

In search of networks of autonomous robots that can talk to each other and deliver "interexchangeable payloads," is the Pentagon bringing us a step closer to Skynet? And what do the Terminator movies suggest about the limits of this technology?

How the atom bomb helped give birth to the Internet

How the atom bomb helped give birth to the Internet
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The interstate highway system isn't the only society-altering network that we can thank the atom bomb for. The Internet, as well, owes its existence in part to the threat of all-out nuclear war between the US and USSR.

Ten years on: why a complete human genome mattered

Ten years on: why a complete human genome mattered
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The completely sequenced human genome has just turned 10. The project has paid amazing dividends, but a lot of researchers resisted the idea when it was first proposed. Ars charts its politicized birth, silent adolescence, and triumphant maturity.

Forgotten lore: Ars reviews newest board game obsession, Crows

Forgotten lore: Ars reviews newest board game obsession, <em>Crows</em>

Crows combines great art with a fun, easy to play concept for 1 to 4 players. Yes, the idea of flocking crows towards graveyards is a little dour, but the game is a very good time.

Why I don't care very much about tablets anymore

Why I don't care very much about tablets anymore

With all of the new tablets coming out this year, you might think everyone at the Orbiting HQ would be excited. But one staffer isn't. Here are four reasons why he just can't get jazzed about new tablets.

Weird Science is no hero

Weird Science is no hero

Lithium makes for long-lasting humans as well as batteries. Our brains contain subconscious keypads. Having a helpful partner is harmful. And never pretend to be a hero when you screw up. Those are just some of the oddities in this week's Weird Science.

Ask Ars: How should my organization approach the IPv6 transition?

Ask Ars: How should my organization approach the IPv6 transition?
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Wondering how your organization should approach the prospect of adding IPv6 support? Here are some concrete steps and examples of how you can make it happen. We'll also let you know how Ars Technica is handling the transition to IPv6.

Week in gaming: video game Grammy, PlayStation Phone, MvC 3

Week in gaming: video game Grammy, PlayStation Phone, <em>MvC 3</em>

This week we looked again at the upcoming Alice sequel, got the full specs for the Xperia PLAY, and reviewed the wonderfully friendly Marvel vs. Capcom 3.

Week in Apple: iPhone symbols, how do they work!?

Week in Apple: iPhone symbols, how do they work!?

Apple announced its new (controversial) subscription system for the iOS App Store, iPhone nano and MobileMe rumors ran rampant, Apple published a new supplier responsibility report (with bonus "involuntary labor"), and we spent time analyzing what the symbols on the back of the iPhone mean. All this and more is part of our weekly roundup.

Week in tech: Anonymous speaks

Week in tech: Anonymous speaks

The ongoing saga of the HBGary hack dominated the news last week, as well as insight into the plot to bring down WikiLeaks. Check out the week's biggest stories from the world of tech.

Week in science: buckyballs and antilasers

Week in science: buckyballs and antilasers

Ars recaps the week's top stories from the realm of Nobel Intent.

Navigating the US National Broadband Map

Navigating the US National Broadband Map

The US government's long-awaited National Broadband Map has arrived, with tons of ways to discover what kinds of Internet services are (or aren't) available in your area. We've got a guided tour of the site.

iPhone may get cheaper, but not smaller

iPhone may get cheaper, but not smaller

Recent rumors about an "iPhone nano" are likely off the mark, according to sources for The New York Times.