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The Arab Awakening
As revolution shakes the Arab world, a series of films explore the roots of the uprisings and ask 'what next'?
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2011 15:07

As protest and revolution shake the Arab world, a new series of films documents the Arab awakening.

Seven one-hour long programmes offer fresh insights into what happened in the region and why, as well as into the lives unexpectedly altered by events.

The first half of the series takes us behind the scenes of the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions, with access to the people who made them happen. It pieces together the jigsaw of events as they played out in the media, in the corridors of power and on the ground.

The second half stands back from events to debate their place in history, global politics and everyday life. We are surprised and entertained to hear those in the know expose how Arab dictators have held onto power for so long. And we are taken into the lives of people across the region, as they reveal their hopes, fears and expectations for the future.

The death of fear

Click here to watch part two

Rageh Omaar examines how the death of a penniless fruit seller in Tunisia first ignited mass revolt in the country, led to the overthrow of its president and effects far beyond its borders.

The death of fear can be seen from Thursday, March 31, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600. 

The end of a dictator



Driven by its youth, Egypt's revolution embraced all sectors of society. As the fear barrier was broken, destinies were transformed by the tumultuous events. An examination of the demise of the Mubarak regime through the eyes of people whose lives were, until now, defined by it.

The end of a dictator can be seen from Thursday, April 7, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600. 

The fall of Mubarak

A day-by-day account of how a protest became a people's revolution and brought down one of the most durable leaders in the Arab world.

The fall of Mubarak can be seen from Thursday, April 14, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600. 

The evolution of revolutions
[GALLO/GETTY]

Marwan Bishara, Al Jazeera's senior analyst, hosts a debate on the triggers and traumas of revolution in the Middle East after decades of repression.

The evolution of revolutions can be seen from Thursday, April 21, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600. 

Seeds of revolution
[EPA]

A film following the activists who led Egypt's revolution, as they attempt to capitalise on their unexpected success.

Seeds of revolution can be seen from Thursday, April 28, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600. 

Absolute power
[AFP] 

Those in a position to know reveal the 'tricks of the trade' of Arab dictatorship.

Absolute power can be seen from Thursday, May 5, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600. 

The people want ...
[REUTERS]

"The people want the fall of the regime" is the shared slogan of the Arab uprisings. An array of characters spanning the Arab world explain what they want and what they expect for the future.

The people want ... can be seen from Thrusday, May 12, at the following times GMT: Thursday: 2000; Friday: 1200; Saturday: 0100; Sunday: 0600; Monday: 2000; Tuesday: 1200; Wednesday: 0100; Thursday: 0600. 

Source:
Al Jazeera
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