READINGS  IN  EARLY  MORMON  HISTORY
(Newspapers of Missouri)


Misc. Missouri Newspapers
1838-1840 Articles


Court House Square, Independence, Missouri, 1830s.


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WStr Aug 31? '38    SAdv Sep 01 '38    Miss Sep 01 '38    SAdv Sep 08 '38    ComAd Sep 18 '38
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WStr Nov 6? '38    SAdv Nov 10 '38    JRep Nov 10 '38    FarW Nov 10 '38    WEm Nov 15 '38
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JRep Feb 02 '39    WEm Feb 07 '39    JRep Feb 09 '39    WEm Apr 18 '39    WEm May 02 '39
WEm Jun 20 '39    JRep Jul 13 '39    WEm Jul 18 '39    WEm Jul 31 '39    MWg Aug 10 '39
MWg Aug 24 '39    MWg Sep 28 '39    MWg Oct 05 '39    MWg Oct 12 '39    MWg Feb 29 '40
MWg Sep 19 '40    MWg Sep 26 '40


Articles Index   |   St. Louis papers   |   Missouri Republican, 1830s

 

THE  WESTERN  STAR.
Vol. ?                             Liberty,  Missouri,  August ?, 1838.                             No. ?


 

MORMONISM. -- From the following proceedings of a public meeting of the citizens of Ray county, our readers will at once perceive the great excitement which prevails in conquence of the conduct of this extraordinary sect. We will not attempt to give the various rumors afloat, of threats and denunciations, as fulminated by Jo Smith and his council. They can be seen in part, in an oration delivered by Sidney Rigdon, on the last 4th of July, in which he threatens to "carry war and extermination" to the lives and property of every citizen who may dare to oppose their wild career.

The Mormons are at this time in open rebellion against the laws of the land. Armed men, as will be found from the statement of Mr. Black, are parading through Daviess county, compelling every person in any way disaffected towards them, to sign an instrument of writing dictated by themselves; the purport of which we are unable to find out.

Under circumstances so alarming to the tranquility of this upper country, the circuit Judge of this District was called upon to issue his warrant for the apprehension of the ring-leaders, who promptly complied by issuing a warrant against Joseph Smith, jr. and Lyman Wight. For the purpose of executing this warrant, it was placed in the hands of the Sheriff of Daviess county, who repaired to the house of Lyman Wight -- and there found an armed force of from 80 to 100 men, and was told by Wight "that he would not be taken alive -- that the law had never protected him, and he owed them no obedience -- that the whole state of Missouri could not take him," &c. Joseph Smith, jr. professed his willingness to be tried, provided it was done in Caldwell county. Upon these facts being made known, the people of Ray county deputed a committee to Smith and Wight, if possible to prevail upon them to cease their opposition, and peaceably submit to the execution of the laws. That committee, as far as we understand, were unsuccessful in their mission. A second committee was then appointed, from whose proceedings we have not heard one word.

The Mormons can raise from 1000 to 1500 fighting men, well armed. They believe Jo Smith to be a prophet of the Lord and that he holds a communion with him. Hence, any statement given to them by said Smith as a Revelation of the Lord, is to be implicitly complied with. He can embody them as one man -- as exemplified in the late election. Suppose then, this modern Mahomet, backed by such a host of armed bigots and enthusiasts, should take it into his head to resist the execution of the laws, would it not verify the statement of Wight, that, even the "whole state of Missouri could not take him!"


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


THE  WESTERN  STAR.
Vol. ?                           Liberty,  Missouri,  August 31?, 1838.                           No. ?



(Mormons in Missouri present a formidable fighting force
under construction)

[They can muster from 1000 to 1500 fighting men; and of that degraded and ignorant class, who implicitly obey the will of their leaders. They have the utmost confidence in Smith, and believe him to be a Prophet of the Lord -- he can embody them to a man, as exemplified in the late election. The leaders appear to be resolute and determined, as foreseeing a difficulty of the kind, they have brought a large quantity of arms and other munitions of war, to the State with them. Sydney Rigdon, another of their leaders, delivered a fourth of July oration in which he declared they would "carry war and extermination" to all who oppose them in their wild career.]

Suppose then, this modern Mahomet, backed by such a host of bigots and enthusiasts, should take into his head to resist the execution of the laws, would it not verify the statement of Wright, that even the "whole State of Missouri could not take him!


Note: The exact date and title of this article remain undertermined. See the Illinois Quincy Whig of Sept. 8, 1838 for a paraphrase of the Star's report.


 


Vol. III.                           Jackson,  Missouri,  September 1, 1838.                           No. 39.


 

THE MORMONS. -- The deluded followers of Jo Smith, are again becoming troublesome neighbors to a portion of our citizens in the northern part of the State. A meeting of the citizens of Carroll county, was recently organised, and a committee of safety appointed "to correspond with the adjoining counties, and make known" their "distressed situation, and request aid to remove Mormons, abolitionists, and other disorderly persons out of the limits of Carroll county." What is the precise nature of the offence of this deluded people, and in what particular they are troublesome neighbors, we are uninformed. They are styled generally in the quotation above, "disorderly persons," but it is certain however that they are troublesome, from the difficulties and excitement of which they have been the authors for the last few years in Jackson, Clay, and Carroll counties. However deluded and however regardless, by virtue of their peculiar religious faith, of the private rights of others, they are still citizens of the State of Missouri, and therefore entitled to the rights and immunities of such. By what color of propriety a portion of the people of the State, can organize themselves into a body, independent of the civil power, and contravene the general laws of the land by preventing the free enjoyment of the right of citizenship to another portion of the people, we are at a loss to comprehend. The evils produced by the Mormon sect, certainly are not above the remedy provided by our penal code; -- they are certainly not universal enemies to all civil institutions, and as such ex necessitate ref, in their case, demand a relaxation of the laws of civil society, and a recurrance, for self-defence, to the means dictated by a state of nature. Would not the most effectual remedy against the evils produced by this people be, to let the law have its course with them?


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


THE  MISSOURIAN.
Vol. ?                       Fayette, Howard Co., Mo., September 1, 1838.                       No. ?


 

Livingston County, August 12, 1838.    
To the Citizens of Carroll County.

Gentlemen: The awful situation of our fellow men (the citizens of Daviess county) is so very distressing that we feel it a duty to give you a statement of facts, that you may give the assistance that the emergency actually requires.

On last Tuesday morning about 250 Mormons, armed and equipped complete, came into Daviess county and surrounded a Mr. Adam Black's, an acting Justice of the Peace in Daviess, and by threatening his life forced him to subscribe a paper by which his liberty, as a freeman, is gone. -- The like affair has been forced from Mr. Enoch Riggs, and they have threatened instant death to all who may oppose their steps of treason. Immediately after the above affair their forces were augmented to the number of from 3 to 400 men all well armed, headed by Joseph Smith, Sidney Rigdon and Lyman Wright [sic]. They have literally overrun a considerable portion of this county, destroying the crops of grain that may be in their way. The lives of many of the most prominent men of Daviess county are threatened. Several men have been sent to Clay, Eay, Jackson and Lafayette counties, and it is seriously believed that the Mormons have taken and killed them. The men who have been sent are William Bownias, Col. Wm. Pennington, Major Etherton, Wilson McKinney and Theodore Pennington. On this morning we received a call from citizens to march to Millport. We have arranged about two hundred men in Livingston and we call unto you for aid.

The Mormons are said to have lately gone to Far West, and it is the prevailing opinion here that there they are fortifying for a seige. Your speedy co-operation with us is anticipated. We will move for Millport on to-morrow morning, and if we get the assistance that we expect, will be able in a few days to make an investigation of the whole affair. The affair of Black was stated by himself, last Friday, at Jesse Neves' to about one hundred.

The above does not comprise any thing like the whole length to which the Mormons have gone. They have, in addition, threatened to take Jaclkson county, and every thing does indicate a battle -- and if we do not get aid very shortly our county is ruined.
I am, Sirs, your very obedient And humble servant, HIRAM CUMSTOCK. One of the Committee.
Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. III.                           Jackson,  Missouri,  September 8, 1838.                           No. 40.


 

MORMONS. -- We publish below the proceedings of a meeting of the citizens of Ray county in this State, passing resolutions condemnatory of the insurrectionary movements of the deluded followers of Jo Smith, and calling upon Judge King, acting in his official capacity, to take some step whereby Jo Smith, Jr. and Lyman Wight, the leaders of the assembled Mormons, shall be "brought to immediate justice."

It is stated that there are already assembled under the leaders above mentioned, at least 500 men with arms and munition of war, who seem determined to force their fanatic opinions at the point of the bayonet; and it is further stated they can muster, at a moment's warning from 1000 to 1500 fighting men.

Deputations have been sent from different counties to urge upon these leaders of the mormon sect, the necessity of desisting from their mad course, and peaceably to submit to the regular [course] of the law. Lyman Wight however declared that, "he would not be taken alive -- that the law had never protected him and that he owed no obedience to it -- that the whole State of Missouri would not take him &c.," but Jo Smith Jr. has expressed his willingness to be tried, provided it was done in Caldwell county. As a grand jury could not be found in that county, who would prefer a bill of indictment against any of the Mormon leaders, or a traverse jury, who would convict them, it would certainly be quite negatory to attempt to punish them in Caldwell county for any breach of the law how grevious soever. Seeing this difficulty the Editor of the Western Star, published at Liberty, Clay county, has wisely suggested the idea, that the next Legislature repeal the law organizing Caldwell county, and that it be attached to the adjoining counties for civil and criminal purposes: Something of this nature will doubtless be necessary effectually to place the Mormons under the arm of the civil power. We have room but for the report of the committee, and the resolutions.

Upon an examination of the facts and circumstances examined by us, consisting of certificates, documents, and other evidence, we are satisfied that there is an armed force now collected and embodied in Daviess county, of about 500 Mormons whose movements are highly insurrectionary and unlawful: -- that they have already committed outrages on individuals who were old and respectable citizens of Daviess county, by taking them in the bosom of their families, and forcing them by threats of immediate violence or death, to sign papers, the particular contents of which are not known to the committee, but which were such as a freeman ought not to sign; -- and that they threaten to make this thing universal throughout the country; and that they are still embodied, and are purchasing and collecting ammunition, and making all preparations for an insurrection, -- or, at least, a great an enormous violation of the laws and the private rights of the citizens of Daviess county. We have also a variety of evidence before us that the leaders of this people are determined not to submit to the law, and that they are entirely revolutionary in their feelings and intentions, and have been so for some considerable time past.

We therefore submit the following resolutions for consideration of the meeting.

1st. Resolved, That we highly disapprove of all improper and unlawful collection of people for any purpose, whatsoever. But that if injuries or injustice is done to any man or body of men, that they shall resort to the laws of the country for redress, which we believe to be amply sufficient for that purpose.

2d. Resolved, That in the opinion of this meeting all the evidence of the movements of said body of Mormons, should be speedily made known to the judge of this Circuit, and that if he deems the evidence sufficient to authorize his action on the subject, the he take such steps to be apprehended and brought to justice all concerned in the violation of the laws, as may be proper.

3d. Resolved, That we believe that Joseph Smith, Jr. and Lyman Wight, are the leaders of this measure, and that we urge upon judge King, the necessity of his action in his official capacity, to have said Smith and Wight brought to immediate justice.

4th. Resolved, That this meeting deprecate any hasty or improper action on the part of the citizens of this county, and that they will do no act which is not justified by the laws of the land.

5th. Resolved, That a committee of vigilance be appointed on the part of this county whose duty it shall be to collect all the information on the subject of the movements of the Mormons, and inform the citizens of this county thereof -- and that they also give any information which they deem necessary to other counties -- and that they be authorized to call a meeting of the citizens of this county when in their opinion it shall be necessary.

6th. Resolved, That a committee be appointed on the part of the people of this county to visit Daviess and Caldwell counties, and collect all the facts in relation to the difficulties between the Mormons and other citizens of Daviess county, and report to the committee of vigilance of this county.

7th. Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be published in the newspaper printed in Liberty; together with the documents herewith returned.

On motion of Dr. R. B. Ellis, the committee of vigilance was composed of seven persons to be appointed by the chair. Whereupon, the chair proceeded to appoint the following persons to compose that committee, viz: Robert B. Ellis, Dr. Thomas Allen, Moses F. Rainwater, Chas. R. Morehouse, Wiley D. Williams, Joseph Ewing, and William Hudgens.

On motion the committee to visit Caldwell and Daviess counties under the 6th resolutions, was composed of three persons to be appointed by the chair. -- Whereupon, the chair proceeded to appoint the following persons to compose that committee, viz: -- Thomas Hamilton, Israel R. Hendley, and William Hudgens, Esquires.

On motion, it was agreed that the traveling expenses of the traveling committee be paid by this meeting.

On motion, it was agreed that this meeting adjourn.

                                WILLIAM B. MARTIN, Cha'm.
AMOS REES, Secretary.


Note: Caldwell County (named after: Capt. Matthew Caldwell) was organized on December, 26, 1836, with its administrative center at the new Mormon settlement of Far West. The county was created out of Ray County by the Missouri Legislature as a kind of reservation for the troublesome Mormons. It is interesting to read that as early as 1838 residents of neighboring counties were attempting to "repeal the law organizing Caldwell county." At that time the county's population had reached about 5,000 -- only about 100 of whom were non-Mormons.


 


THE  WESTERN  STAR.
Vol. ?                         Liberty, Missouri, Friday, September 14, 1838.                         No. ?



THE  MORMONS.

We desire in the statement we are about to make to give a true narrative of the causes which have produced the difficulty between the Mormons and the citizens of Daviess county, as well as to give all that has occurred respecting the movements of both parties since the first difficulty took place.

At the election in Daviess county a citizen objected to a Mormon voting, which brought about angry words. The Mormon was strucj with a club, and, in return, used the same weapon himself, and, before the affair terminated, several on both sides were engaged, and knives freely used. No person was killed, but some cut and bruised.

The excitement did not terminate with the fight. -- Shortly afterwards, Joe Smith, Lyman Wight, and other Mormon leaders, collected a large force in Caldwell, and went into Daviess county to protect the Mormons residing there. They went armed and equipped for war, but they say their intentions were peace; and, if what we hear be true respecting the paper which they presented to Adam Black, a justice of the peace, for his signature, a very different face has been placed upon the transaction to what B. has sworn to. The paper Smith presenetd to Black was to the effect that inasmuch as it was anticipated that difficulties would grow out of the fight at the election, between the Mormons and the citizens of Daviess, he (Black) as a justice of the peace pledged himself that he would take lawful notice of any unlawful proceedings of either party -- Smith representing to Black that if he would sign such a paper, he would show it to his own people, and to others, and that it would have an effect to prevent difficulties.

We understand that the facts illicited at the trial of Smith and Wight (who gave themselves up, and were heard before the judge of our circuit court last week) completely stamped the certificate of Black, Comstock, and others with falsehood. After the trialof Smith and Wight, it was believed that difficulties had ceased, but not so. The people of Daviess county had sent letters and messengers to other counties in order to raise men to drive all the Mormons out of Daviess, and many from other counties had gone to their aid. The Mormons seeing this, made preparations also. When, seeing the crisis at which things were arriving, the Judge of our Circuit, Hon. Austin A. King, directed General D. R. Atchison to raise 1000 men in his Division, and forthwith march them into Daviess, to keep the peace, and prevent bloodshed.

Two hundred men from Clay, under the command of Brig. Gen. Doniphen, Major Lightburne, and Capt's Moss, Whittington, and Price, marched out on yesterday and the day before.

We are not apprehensive that any thing serious will take place, though both parties have become much excited. Both sides are to blame, but our opinion is that the Mormons are the aggressors. Until the 4th July, we heard of no threat being made against them, in any quarters. The people had all become reconciled to let them remain where they are, and indeed were disposed to lend them a helping hand. But one Sidney Rigdon, in order to show himself off as a great man, collected them all together in the town of Far West, on the 4th July, and there delivered a speech containing the essence of, if not treason itself. This speech was not only published in the newspapers, but handbills were struck for distribution in Caldwell and Daviess counties. We have not the speech now before us, but we recollect amongst other threats, that the author said: "We will not suffer any vexatious law-suits with our people, nor will we suffer any person to come into our streets and abuse them." Now, if this is not a manifestation of a disposition to prevent the force of law, we do not know what is. -- It is also true, that when the Mormons left this county, they agreed to settle in, and confine themselves to a district of country, which has since been formed into the county of Caldwell; but they have violated that agreement, and are spreading over Daviess, Clinton, Livingston and Carroll. Such a number had settled in Daviess, that the old inhabitants were apprehensive they would be governed soon, by the Revelations of the great Prophet, Joe Smith, and hence their anxiety to rid themselves of such an incubus.

So many reports are in circulation relative to battles fought, and men on both sides being killed and captured, that it is hard to get at the truth. We are certain, however, that up to yesterday, no person had been killed. Three men from Ray county were captured by the Mormons, and some 50 guns taken. The men are in confinement, (or rather, are guarded and kept,) in the town of Far West; and it is said the people of Daviess have captured one Mormon.

Gen. Doniphan, in some remarks made to the company which went out from this county said, that the men and arms captured by the Mormons would be demanded, as also the Mormon captive in Daviess. Should the Mormons refuse to give up the men and arms, the worst consequences must follow.

We hope and believe they will not be so blinded as to refuse; but if they should, we can tell them, that "war to the knife" will be waged against them, and they will no longer be suffered to remain in the State. We rely greatly upon the standing and influence of Generals Atchison and Doniphan, as well as the other gentlemen who have gone out, to bring this matter to a peaceable termination.


Note: The above text is taken from a reprint published in the St. LOuis Missouri Republican of Sept. 22, 1838.


 


COMMERCIAL  ADVERTISER.
Vol. ?                           Hannibal,  Missouri,  September 18, 1838.                           No. ?



THE  MORMONS.

His Excellency Liliburn W. Boggs.

Dear Sir: The country is in ... [most of first paragraph of clipping illegible]

... [of] all who are not Mormons. It is not our object at this [------] to trouble you with a [detail] of all the [-------s] in reference to this affair, but we will state a [----] within our own knowledge, being from a man who left this neighborhood to join the Mormons, and who has had the reputation among the citizens of Clariton county for a number of years, as being a man of strict veracity. He has returned perfectly satisfied that their object is everything the opposite of christian feeling and principles. The following statement which he makes, he gives of his own request and under his own hand:

"I have resided among the people called Mormons about five months, during which time I have had [frequent opportunities] of meeting with them, both [-----] public and private associations, and have sought every possible opportunity of acquiring information.

"I distinctly recollect of hearing Joseph Smith, the prophet, state in a public discourse, that he had [fourteen thousand men] not belonging to the church ready at a moment's warning (which was generally understood to mean Indians)

"It was a very common source of rejoicing [among all classes, -----] the women and children participating, that the time had arrived when all the wicked should be destroyed from the face of the [earth], and that the Indians would be the principal agents by which this object would be accomplished.

"This a common feeling among them, amounting to a conspiracy, to protect one another against the [civil] officers of the country, even if it should be attended with death.

"The public teachers have recently been very [urgent] in schooling the people to fly to their [-------ing] protection, as the time had arrived when the [flying angel] should pass through the land accompanied by the Indians, to accomplish the work of destruction [---- ----- ers] stating that they will have enough men to protect themselves whilst the work is going on!"
                                      NATHAN MARSH.


From the above facts, added to the general reports we have, with all due consideration, thought proper to suggest to your Excellency the [propriety of issuing orders to the militia], so that [in case of necessity] they may be called on according to the exigency of circumstances.


THE  MORMONS.

The committee appointed by the meeting held in this place, on Saturday last, and instructed to report to the scene of recent difficulties and aggressions, with the Mormons, have just returned from their mission and we learn from Mr. P. Jackson, one of this committee, that things do not present a scene so very [-----ing] as has been represented by various reports from that quarter. Some of the leading Mormons have [--------ed] their willingness to submit themselves [to the] legal authorities, [------] we may [infer that no] serious difficulty will arise. --



From the Missouri Republican.

THE  MORMONS.

We had hoped that this difficulty was at an end; but more recent intelligence leaves no doubt of the quarrel being of a more serious character than was at first anticipated. Below we give an extract from a letter written by a respectable gentleman of Lexington, and addressed to a citizen of this city. This account of the state of affairs is truly alarming. The writer says: "Great excitement prevails the other side of the river against the Mormons -- they are all up in arms and have, we understand this morning, had some fighting, which resulted in the killing of a few of both parties. The citizens of Ray county sent a wagon load of arms and ammunition, to the citizens of Daviess for the purpose of defending themselves. On their way out they were captured by a company of Mormons, and taken to Far West. A Committee has this morning arrived from the other side asking for men to assist them in the protection of their property."

We learn from the Clerk of the steam boat Howard, which came down yesterday, that a report was circulating along the Missouri river that the Mormons had fortified their town (Far West) and were determined to hold out. They were stated to be about one thousand strong and well supplied with arms and ammunition. The following statements from the Boonville Emigrant of the 13th are confirmatory of this report:

MORMON  TROUBLES.          

We have just conversed with General Wilson, of Howard county, who states that on last Saturday he saw a letter dated on the 7th instant. from a committee of gentlemen in Davies county, calling on them to raise a force and come to their assistance, and aid them im expelling the Mormons from the county: -- That the citizens of Daviess had removed their families, and were making preparations for warlike operation; that the Mormons were in a state of open rebellion against the laws, and war between them and the citizens was inevitable; that the people of Daviess had come to the fixed determination of commencing the attack on Saturday last.

From the best information we can obtain, the Mormons are from 1500 to 2000 fighting men; and it is stated upon good authority, that a large emigrating party of Mormons are now on their way from Canada to join their friends in Missouri, which will increase their force, so as to make them very formidble: if this war should break out, it must become a war of extermination, as the Mormons are desperate, and rendered more so by the fanatical spirit infused into them by that arch-deceiver, Jo Smith, under whose banner they act, and by whose malign influence they are misguided, and ready for any act of desperation. Their disorderly conduct for months past, has so exasperated the people that they can no longer tolerate or permit them to remain among them.

P. S. Since writing the above, we have understood that a gentleman from Ray county has just arrived at Boonville, who brings information, that the inhabitants of Daviess county have postponed warlike operations against the Mormons until Monday; the probable reason for this change of day is on account of the Sabbath day coming next after the first fixed upon. They consider it better that Monday instead of Saturday, as a day more appropriate, expecting to be able to prevail against them better by having the whole week before them.



Mormons [----- -----].

A passer-by from the Grand River [country], reported here, on yesterday, that, on Sunday [last, troops were ------ ---] Daviess county [ ---] of one hundred men, waiting for [-------- -------s] to march against the Mormons. He also reported that the Mormons had [attacked a ---- -----] with munitions of war, which a few [----- ------ ---- ------ ---- --- -----] to Far West, the County seat of Caldwell.

That the first part of the report may be [---------ly relied on] we do not .... seem to have come to the conclusion, that [------ ------] out armed force in aid of [civil ----- ------ ---- ----] here also than to the Governor [------ ].

                          Mill Port, Mo. Aug. 29, 1838.
To the Citizens of Clay County,"

You have been apprised from various reports of our perilous and unpleasant [-------] with the Mormons of this and Caldwell county. [For the purpose] of our better securing, [-------- ------- -----] of the citizens of this county [we, your [--- --- -----] petitioners were appointed [---- ----- --- ---] to correspond with the citizens of the adjoining counties, in order that they may [------ ---- ---ders] and the proceedings of the Mormons [--------]. We therefore beg leave to inform you that from the continued threats of Mormons, [----- ----s] are daily fleeing from their [homes ---- ----- ---ing] their all to the [--------- ----] of this [----less] set of fanatics and [------ ------ -----es] this county, and the [----- -----ing] of this committee is. that the [apprehension of danger] is not [--------ded]. [------ from the formidable force they short time since paraded in [--------y], trampling both law and humanity, under their feet, we think there exists good cause to apprehend consequences of the most [direful character.]

The leaders of the banditti have not, and say they will not be taken, nor submit to the laws of the land. Two or three [------ual] attempts have been made to bring them to justice, and [----- -----] they may be apprehended, we call upom you, to render us such assistance as may be in your power. Our [county] will assemble on Friday the 31st inst., at which time they will all be authorized by our Sheriff and held in readiness until we may get such assistance from other counties, as they may deem fit to render us, who will also be summoned by our Sheriff. This will give them an opportunity of co-operating with us without violating the law, and presents, perhaps, the last opportunity (until too late,) we may ever have to deal with [this set] of men as they deserve. That the laws may then be enforced, yes our laws, [the poor and rich man's only] guarantee, may be executed, that it may not [------t] to a deed larger in our land, that [our ------], lives, property and all that is held dear by free men may not be encroached upon with impunity, we call upon you with full assurance in the power if the law, and you the people its executors for [protection] and defence against the intrusion upon our rights, from this and all other out-lawed [------------s]. Many of you have friends and [connexions] living here, whose property, lives, and privileges as citizens of a free republic are daily [trampled] and endangered by this hord of Canadian refugees. Will you, can you stand by and see your fellow citizens, who have toiled with you in our country's common cause, that have [bled] alike with you from the ball and bayonets of these [--------al] British slaves! We have asked, can you still stand by and look cooly on? We answer for you, no!
WM. DRYDEN,
WM. P. PENISTON,
P. COVINGTON,
J. PINKERTON,
JOHN K. KERER,
Committee of Vigilance.
P. S. -- The day [-------- ------- --------- ------- ----] the 7th day of September, by which [time] we have [---- --------- ------- --------- ------- ------]   W. D.


Note: The statement given by Nathan Marsh, regarding the Missouri Mormons' relations with the Indians, brought this Sept. 8th response from LDS leaders Smith and Rigdon: "We hereby certify that we have learned that a Mr. Nathan Marsh has certified that the people some times called Mormons have ingratiated themselves with the Indians, for the purpose of getting the Indians to commit depredations upon the people of this state, which certificate of Marsh (as represented to us) is utterly false. We have never had any communication with the Indians on any subject; and we, and all the Mormon church, as we believe, entertain the same feelings and fears towards the Indians that are entertained by other citizens of this state, We are friendly to the constitution and laws of this state and of the United States, and wish to see them enforced."


 


Vol. III.                           Liberty,  Missouri,  Sept. ?, 1838.                           No. ?



THE MORMONS -- PUBLIC MEETING.

A portion of the citizens of Jackson County met in Independence on the 4th day of Sept., 1838. On motion of Gen. M. G. Wilson, R. R. Rees Esq. was called to the chair and C. J. Sullivan appointed Secretary.

The chair addressed the meeting, in a very appropriate manner, setting forth the object of the meeting and also the existing difficulties between the citizens of Davies and other counties and the Mormons. On motion the chair appointed Solomon Fitzhugh, Daniel King, James Smith, James King, Sen. and Morton Davis, committee, who after a short retirement submitted the following preamble and resolutions.

The committee beg leave to submit the following preamble and resolutions, as the sense of this meeting.

Whereas, an express from a committee of Daviess co. under date of the 29th Aug. 1838 has been presented to this committee for consideration.

And whereas, this committee believe from the best information, that the laws have been disregarded by a set of Fanatics called Mormons. And whereas, the citizens of Daviess co. are unpleasantly situated, in consequence of repeated threats of violence and even extermination. --

Be it therefore Resolved. That we deeply sympathize with the citizens of Daviess county, and all others who are molested by this banditti -- the Mormons.

Resolved, That the citizens of this county should feel themselves bound to aid their fellow-citizens of Daviess County.

Resolved, That we will aid the citizens of Daviess co. in the proper execution of the law.

Resolved, That this meeting do now adjourn until Saturday next, at which time all the citizens of Jackson county, are respectfully requested to attend, for the purpose of volunteering to start on Monday next to Daviess co. to aid our fellow-citizens of Daviess in the execution of the law.

Resolved, That the messenger, Mr. Bowman, from Daviess co. be furnished with a copy of this meeting.

The meeting then adjourned


Note: Title and exact date of the above article are uncertain -- text comes from an excerpt published in the Missouri Jeffersonian Republican of Sept. 22, 1838.


 


MISSOURI  WATCHMAN.
Vol. ?                       Jefferson City, Mo., Monday, Sept. 20, 1838.                       No. ?


 

Information has been received by express from Judge King, who presides in the circuit where the difficulty exists, that an insurrection is now actually on foot in the counties of Caldwell and Daviess. The same information has just been received from Gen. Atchinson, who is now at Richmond, with 250 men, and intends proceeding immediately to the scene of difficulty. Gen. A. has ordered out 400 more men from his division. In consequence of this information, the governor has, by expresses, ordered generals Grant of Boone, to have three hundred men, Clark, of Howard, to have five hundred men, Lucas of Jackson, four hundred men and Crowther, of Cooper, four hundred men, organized and to march immediately to the scene of difficulty, to suppress the insurrection and restore order to the community. Gen Atchinson states that the men now under arms in Daviess and Caldwell, are not less than 2000; the greater part of whom are Mormons, and the balance citizens.

The governor has also ordered out the Boonville Guards, to be in readiness, to join him at Boonville on Saturday or Sunday next, and march with him to the scene of operation. The governor, adjutent general, and two aids leave this morning.

Major general Bolton will also repair to the scene of action with some two hundred volunteers from this county in two or three days.

The only object of the commander-in-chief seems to be to prevent the shedding of blood and restore order to the community.

The citizens in that quarter may now rest assured that the strong arm of the law will be enforced and themselves protected in their rights.


Note 1: The title and the precise text of this issue's report in uncertain. No copy of Missouri Watchman of the 20th is known to have been preserved. The text was taken from a reprint which appeared in the Oct. 6, 1838 number of Niles Register.

Note 2: The files of the Missouri Watchman are incomplete and not easily accessible; it was a weekly paper, published at Jefferson City by Hammond & Cronenbold. It was started on Mar. 29, 1838, a few months before the "Mormon War" began in upper Missouri. This article may be one of the few extant reprints of the Missouri Watchman's Sept. 20, 1838 report on the Mormon troubless.


 


THE  WESTERN  STAR.
Vol. ?                         Liberty, Missouri, Friday, September 21?, 1838.                         No. ?



THE  MORMONS.

We desire in the statement we are about to make, to give a true narrative of the causes which have produced the difficulty between the Mormons and the citizens of Daviess county, as well as to give all that has occurred respecting the movements of both parties since the first difficulty took place.

At the election in Daviess county, a citizen objected to a Mormon's voting which brought about angry words -- the Mormon was struck with a club, and in return used the same weapon himself; and before the affair terminated, several on both sides were engaged, and knives freely used. No person was killed, but some were cut and bruised.

The excitement did not terminate with the fight. Shortly afterwards. Joe Smith, Lyman Wright, and other Mormon leaders collected a large force in Caldwell, and went into Daviess county to protect the Mormons residing there. They went armed and equipped for war, but they say their intentions were peace, and if what we hear be true, respecting the paper which they presented to Adam Black, a justice of the peace, for his signature, a very different face has been placed upon the transaction to what B. has sworn to. The paper Smith presented to Black, was to the effect, that, inasmuch as it was anticipated that difficulties would grow out of the fight at the election, between the Mormons and the citizens of Daviess, he (Black,) as a justice of the peace, pledged himself that he would take lawful notice of any unlawful proceedings of either party -- Smith representing to Black, that if he would sign such a paper, he would show it to his own people and to others, and that it would have an effect to prevent difficulties.

We understand that the facts elicited at the trial of Smith and Wright (who gave themselves up. and were heard before the Judge of our Circuit Court last week,) completely stamped the certificate of Black, Comstock, and others, with falsehood. After the trial of Smith and Wright, it was believed that difficulties had ceased, but not so. The people of Daviess county had sent letters and messengers to other counties, in order to raise men to drive all the Mormons out of Daviess, and many from other counties had gone to their aid. The Mormons seeing this, made preparations also. When. seeing the crisis at which things were arriving, the judge of our Circuit, Hon. Austin A. King, directed General D. R. Atchison to raise 1,000 men in his Division, and forthwith march into Daviess, to keep the peace, and prevent bloodshed.

Two hundred men from Clay, under the command of Brig. Gen. Doniphen, Maj. Lightburne, and Capts. Moss, Whitington, and Price, marched out on yesterday and the day before.

We are not apprehensive that any thing serious will take place, though both parties have become much excited. Both sides are to blame, but our opinion is that the Mormons are the aggressors. Until the 4th of July, we heard of no threats being made against them in any quarter. The people had all become reconciled to let them remain where they are, and indeed were disposed to lend them a helping hand. But one Sidney Rigdon, in order to show himself a great man, collected them all together in the town of Far West, on the 4th of July, and there delivered a speech containing the essence of, if not treason itself. This speech was not only published in the newspapers, but handbills were struck for distribution in Caldwell and Daviess counties. We have not the speech now before us, but we recollect amongst other threats, that the author said: "We will not suffer any vexatious law-suits with our people, nor will we suffer any person to come into our streets and abuse them." Now, if this is not a manifestation of a disposition to prevent the force of law, we do not know what is. It is also true, that when the Mormons left this county, they agreed to settle in, and confine themselves to a district of country, which has since been formed into the county of Caldwell; but they have violated that agreement, and are spreading over Daviess, Clinton, Livingston and Carroll. Such a number had settled in Daviess, that the old inhabitants were apprehensive they would be governed soon, by the Revelations of the Prophet, Joe Smith, and hence their anxiety to rid themselves of such an incubus.

So many reports are in circulation relative to battles fought, and men on both sides being killed and captured, that it is hard to get at the truth. We are certain, however, that up to yesterday, no person had been killed. Three men from Ray county were captured by the Mormons, and some 50 guns taken. The men are in confinement, (or rather, are guarded and kept,) in the town of Far West; and it is said the people of Daviess have captured one Mormon.

Gen. Doniphen, in some remarks made to the company which went out from this county said, that the men and arms captured by the Mormons would be demanded, as also the Mormon captive in Daviess. Should the Mormons refuse to give up the men and arms, the worst consequences must follow.

We hope and believe they will not be so blinded as to refuse; but if they should, we can tell them, that "war to the knife" will be waged against them, and they will no longer be suffered to remain in the State. We rely greatly upon the standing and influence of Generals Atchinson and Doniphan, as well as the other gentlemen who have gone out, to bring this matter to a peaceable termination.


Note: The exact date of the above article has not yet been determined -- the text is from a reprint published in the Illinois Quincy Whig of Sept. 29, 1838, which is prefaced with this introduction: "Between four and five hundred of these people recently passed through Springfield, on their way to Caldwell county, Missouri. Jo Smith will soon be able to verify his boast, 'that the whole State of Missouri could not take him,' if his deluded followers swarm around him in this manner."


 


Vol. 10.                           Jefferson City,  September 22, 1838.                          No. 571.



THE  MORMON  WAR.

Our plough-shares have been turned into swords in this quarter, and the Mormon war is the all engrossing topic of conversation. Even politics is submerged in the deafening round of the drum and the call to arms.

It is the general opinion, we believe, that there is something more than spec of war on the carpet. The proceedings which we publish of a numerous meeting from the Far West, will shew the feeling existing in that quarter. We hope a lesson will be taught to those deluded people who know no laws, and who are so regardless of morals, that they will not soon forget.

The Mormons, from the best information we can obtain, present quite a belligerent attitude, and are about 2000 strong, well armed and entrenched in a strong fort.

Major General Lewis Bolton, marches today from this county, with 200 mounted volunteers for the seat of war.

From Howard county, we understand 500 mounted men are on their line of march, under the command of Gen. Clark.

From Cooper, 400, under the command of Gen. Crowther.

From Boone, 300, under the command of Gen. Grant.

From Jackson, 400, under the command of Gen. Lucas

In addition to the above force, Gen. Atkinson of the U. S. Army, has 250 men on the ground, and has ordered a re-inforcement of 100 more.

The Commander in Chief, together with Adjutant Gen. Lisle, departed on Thursday for the seat of war.

After all these war-like movements, which have most certainly been adapted to the exigency, we await with extreme solicitude further information.



From the Far West.

THE  MORMONS -- PUBLIC  MEETING.

A portion of the citizens of Jackson County met in Independence on the 4th day of Sept., 1838. On motion of Gen. M. G. Wilson, R. R. Rees Esq. was called to the chair and C. J. Sullivan appointed Secretary.

The chair addressed the meeting, in a very appropriate manner, setting forth the object of the meeting and also the existing difficulties between the citizens of Davies and other counties and the Mormons. On motion the chair appointed Solomon Fitzhugh, Daniel King, James Smith, James King, Sen. and Morton Davis, committee, who after a short retirement submitted the following preamble and resolutions.

The committee beg leave to submit the following preamble and resolutions, as the sense of this meeting.

Whereas, an express from a committee of Daviess co. under date of the 29th Aug. 1838 has been presented to this committee for consideration.

And whereas, this committee believe from the best information, that the laws have been disregarded by a set of Fanatics called Mormons. And whereas, the citizens of Daviess co. are unpleasantly situated, in consequence of repeated threats of violence and even extermination. --

Be it therefore Resolved. That we deeply sympathize with the citizens of Daviess county, and all others who are molested by this banditti -- the Mormons.

Resolved, That the citizens of this county should feel themselves bound to aid their fellow-citizens of Daviess County.

Resolved, That we will aid the citizens of Daviess co. in the proper execution of the law.

Resolved, That this meeting do now adjourn until Saturday next, at which time all the citizens of Jackson county, are respectfully requested to attend, for the purpose of volunteering to start on Monday next to Daviess co. to aid our fellow-citizens of Daviess in the execution of the law.

Resolved, That the messenger, Mr. Bowman, from Daviess co. be furnished with a copy of this meeting.

The meeting then adjourned



                                           Saturday, Aug. 8, 1838.
The meeting met at the Court House pursuant to adjournment, whereupon the committee presented the following resolutions.

The committee submit the following resolutions in addition to those submitted and adopted on Tuesday last, the 4th inst.

Resolved, That the citizens of Jackson co. know the Mormons to be a set of Fanatics and impostors and that they are a pest to the community at large.

Resolved, That the Mormons are a lawless set of beings, who entertain principles that lead to CIVIL WAR and that are calculated to destroy both civil and religious privileges.

Resolved, That the citizens of Jackson will aid the citizens of Daviess co. in enforcing the laws, when called on by proper authority.

Resolved, That every individual, who intends starting, on Monday next, according to the resolutions of Tuesday lasr, give in his name to the president of this meeting.

Resolved, That the Governor be furnished with a copy of the proceedings of this meeting.

Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be published by the papers of the State of Mo.

Resolved, That this meeting now adjourn.
                                           R. R. REES, Pres.
C. J. SULLIVAN,
      Secretary.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 3.                           Jackson,  Missouri,  September 29, 1838.                           No. 43.



From the Far West.

THE  MORMONS -- PUBLIC  MEETING.

(same article as in Sept. 22 Jeffersonian Republican)

 


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. III.                           Liberty,  Missouri,  Sept. ?, 1838.                           No. ?



THE  MORMONS.

We are happy to say that no further difficulty is anticipated between the Mormons and the citizens of Daviess. So far as we have heard, all who went to the scene of troubles, concur in saying that both parties are in the wrong, and that no difficulty may be expected except that it arises from the indiscretion of individuals belonging to each of the beligerents. -- It is much to be regretted to every lover of peace, that contentions and quarrelsome disposed persons should throw a whole community into commotion. It is not at all pleasant to be engaged in settling such difficulties, and we sincerely hope that this may be the last time this quarrelsome controversy may arise. --


Note: Title and exact date of the above article are uncertain -- text comes from an excerpt published in the Missouri Jeffersonian Republican of Oct. 6, 1838.


 


Vol. 10.                       Jefferson City,  October 6, 1838.                       No. 573.


THE  MORMON  WAR.
AND  COLE  VOLUNTEERS.

We stated in our last number that the difficulties between the Mormons and the citizens of the counties of Daviess and Caldwell were [amicably settled].We have now only to greet the [arrival] and dismissal of the Volunteers of this county. The Commander in Chief, having heard in Boonville, on the 25th ultimo that the Mormon disturbances were settled, then and there issued his orderto Maj. Gen. Bolton to discharge the troops under his command, destined for that service. General B. accordingly discharged the troops under his command in Boonville, with a request that they should meet, on Mondaylast, in this place to give up their arms drawn from the State, and to be finally discharged. They therefore, on the day appointed, convened at Mr. H. Dixon's one mile above town, hoisted a white flag on a hickory pole, marched into town, and saluted His Excellency the Governor. They then took a recess of half an hour, delivered up their arms and marched up in front of Messrs. Kean & Bartlett's store, where the subjoined order and letter were read to them by one of Fen. B.'s Aids, the Gen'l. being absent sick:



                           HEADQUARTERS OF THE MILITIA,
BOONVILLE, SEPT. 25TH, 1838.

Gen. Lewis Bolton, 6th Division Mo. Militia:

SIR --

The Commander in Chief avails himself of the present occassion, to ...
[order and letter mostly illegible in clipping]



THE  MORMONS.

We are happy to say that no further difficulty is anticipated between the Mormons and the citizens of Daviess. So far as we have heard, all who went to the scene of troubles, concur in saying that both parties are in the wrong, and that no difficulty may be expected except that it arises from the indiscretion of individuals belonging to each of the beligerents. -- It is much to be regretted to every lover of peace, that contentions and quarrelsome disposed persons should throw a whole community into commotion. It is not at all pleasant to be engaged in settling such difficulties, and we sincerely hope that this may be the last time this quarrelsome controversy may arise. -- Far West.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 3.                           Liberty,  Missouri,  Oct. 25, 1838.                           No. ?



(General Atchison orders out militia of Clay Co.
under construction)




Note: Title and content of the above article are uncertain -- citation comes from an excerpt published in the St. Louis Missouri Republican of Nov. 3, 1838.


 


THE  MISSOURIAN.
Vol. ?                       Fayette, Howard Co., Mo., Saturday, Oct. 27, 1838.                       No. ?



THE  MORMONS.

An express to the Governor passed through this place on Wednesday, bearing authentic intelligence if renewed aggressions on the part of this deluded people. We have not room for the various depositions (copies of which are in our office) and must needs content ourselves with a relation of their substance. They are, to the effect, that men and women and children are driven from their homes and their beds in Daviess, into the snows of the prairies -- sometimes without even the preparation of shoes for the young ones! Houses have been burned -- the county town (Gallatin) was burned (including the post-office and the county treasury) -- the civil magistrates are defied, and the sword and the seymetar are made to represent alike the law and the fact, the right and the remedy!

We have done with counsel, because it might be again unheeded, if not rebuked, and we hence conclude our notice with a copy of a letter of a respectable subaltern addressed to the commander-in-chief. His name is withheld in consideration, alone, of the terror of the times -- but we have written authority to give it up to any one who may feel himself aggrieved. Even the best disposed persons may learn, anon, that devils can only be fought with fire.

Copy of a letter or report to the governor from Daviess County.

Sir: I deem it my duty, made so not only from the law, as an officer, but also as an individual, to report and make known to your excellency the unheard of, unprecedented conduct and high handed proceedings of the Mormons of this and Caldwell Counties, towards the people of the county, being myself one of the sufferers.

On Monday the 15th ult., we learned that the Mormons were collecting in Far West, for the purpose of driving what they termed the mob from Daviess, by which we understood the citizens who were not Mormons; and accordingly they have come, and their worst apprehensions have been already fulfilled.

They have plundered, robbed and burned every house in Gallatin, (our county seat,) among the rest our post-office. They have driven almost every individual from the county, who are now flying before them with their families, many of whom have been forced out without their ordinary clothing -- their wives and their children wading in many instances through the snow, even without their shoes. When the miserable families are thus forced from their homes, they plunder and burn their houses. This they are making this universal throughout the county. They have burned for me two houses. Think not this exaggeration, for all is not told; and for the truth of all and every statement here made, I pledge the honor of an officer and a gentleman.

These facts are made known to you, sir, hoping that your authority will be used to stop the career of this banditti of Canadian refugees, and restore us to our lost homes.

I neglected to state that among the rest, our county treasury office has been also burned. I will only ask in conclusion, can such proceedings be submitted to in a government of laws? I think not; and I must therefore answer my interrogatory by saying no, notwithstanding the political juggling of such men as David R. Atchison -- and some others, whose reports and circulations setting the conduct and character of the Mormons favorably before the community, are believed by the peoples of this county to be prompted by the hope of interest or emolument.

P.S. The amount of property of various kinds stolen or destroyed at this time is not less than $20,000, and the work is still going on.


The following comes to us from a respectable citizen of Caldwell.

To the editor of the Missourian: Much is and has been said respecting Mormonism, and a great deal of abusive language has been used against the citizens of Carroll for the course pursued towards the Mormons who have settled at De Witt, in said county. But, sir, I am fully satisfied that those persons who hold up for the Mormons and Mormonism, are either unfriendly to this county, or unacquainted with the true character of the Mormons. It is true the citizens of Carroll raised arms against the Mormons, and were determined to drive them out of the country at all hazards, and I have no doubt that all who are acquainted with the situation of Carroll County, will justify them in taking up arms. You are well aware that the population of Carroll is limited, and the Mormons are in the habit of settling themselves in such bodies that in one or two years they would have outnumbered the other citizens, and I have no hesitation in saying that in three years from this time every office in Carroll would have been filled by a Mormon! Therefore, under these considerations, the citizens of Carroll considered themselves fighting for liberty, and justifiable in the course which they adopted.

The difficulties between the citizens of Carroll and the Mormons were settled by the interposition of some citizens from Howard county, by which the citizens of Carroll became the owners of the real estate which the Mormons held in said county, by paying at least twice its real value. It has been stated by diverse men, who stand fair in society, that the present difficulties with the Mormons amounts to a political quarrel, and that the whigs in the upper counties are waging war upon the Mormons for the democratic vote which they gave at the last election. Such statements are unfounded and untrue. Both the whig and democrat are as one man in this controversy. They are fighting for liberty and politics have nothing to do in this quarrel. The Mormons say God gave them [this] section of the country, and they will have it. The other citizens say they have paid for it, and are determined to enjoy it or die. And now sir, I would wish to know what the friends to Mormons and Mormonism will say to the course pursued by the Mormons in Davies county during the past week? They have burned the court-house, post-office, one store-house and several private dwellings belonging to the citizens of the country! I will now respectfully ask the citizens of Missouri if such characters are to remain among us?
  October 18, 1838.

Later and more dreadful news.

The simultaneous tolling of the bells aroused us from our [pillows] last night to hear the rehersal of the most barbarous atrocities. The following letters which were read before the meeting, which speedily assembled in the Court House, embody the principal facts, as succinctly perhaps, as any language which we could substitute -- and we hence submit them without farther comment than that the authors are gentlemen of the first respectability. The meeting last night adjourned to meet again at 9 this morning, for the purpose of organizing and marching this evening or to-morrow.

SNOWDEN'S, Oct. 25, 1838.        

Col. Jones, Sir -- News has just reached us here that the Mormons have attacked and cut to pieces Capt. Bogard's company of 50 men, except three or four who had escaped. They say the Mormon force is 200 or 400. Richmond is threatened to night. If you can spare, I wish you to detail two or three companies of troops, and repair to Richmond will all speed.

Yours in haste,                    
GEO. WOODWARD,
                Aid to General Parks.



CARROLTON, Oct. 25, 1838.        

Gentlemen: News of an appalling nature has just reached us. Capt. Bogard, who was ordered with his company to guard the frontier of Ray county, was attacked and cut to pieces by immense numbers. -- They were overpowered by 3 or 400 Mormons, while they were guarding their own frontier. But five minutes ago, three reports of a cannon were heard in the direction of Richmond. Firing has been heard in various directions, and there is no doubt but that these infatuated villians have attacked Richmond.

The news of their burning and pillage has already reached you. They have indubitably captured the cannon, and taken many prisoners -- probably killed many. Daviess county is a scene of desolation. Ray is probably so ere this time; and their next movement will be at this place. It is already threatened.

Be up and doing. Bring all the men you can, and let us check them in their course of destruction and devastation. They are moving on with great strides to the climax of anarchy, civil war, and desolation. Wolf and Baker will explain all. I have just received orders, by express, from Gen. Brig. Parks, to raise 150 mounted men. Fifty have volunteered, and the remainder I will obtain in a day or two.

Stir the people up in Howard and Chariton. Send all the braces you can with Wolf, and we can meet and check them in their mad career.
                      Yours in haste,
                          WM. CLAUDE JONES.

      To Congrave Jackson and others.



                                                                               Far West, Sept. 21, 1838.

Sir: I perceive that you have been imposed upon ny the misrepresentations that have been set afloat in regard to our brotherhood. They have been accused of designs against the peace and welfare of the people of Missouri, whereas [their] only object, as a body, has been to live quietly and honestly, without any disposition to molest or disturb those around them. It is true that some of our number, have been [p------ed] to use harsh expressions, and is it wonderful, when it is recollected how we have been persecuted and driven out from our homes by the people of Jackson county? We have, it is admitted, peculiar views on religious subjects, but is this to be tortured into a "railing accusation" against us? If so, where is the boasted "liberty of conscience" of which we hear so much, but I am mortified to say, see so little?

The recent difficulties -- as will appear, if the truth is allowed to come to light -- have been [fomented] by the basest and most ridiculous impulses, that ever disgraced humanity. A vile avarice -- envy -- and foolish fear have [led] to the state of things but lately existing in this quarter. There are those, in our vicinity, like their tyrannical oppressors in Jackson county, who covet our lands. They do not thrive, as we do, and they hate the sight of our prosperity. These have raised a silly cry of mad dog to our prejudice, and the consequence has been that this whole region has been set in a ferment by them. False certificates and the most infamous statements have been got up for this purpose. Our rights have been invaded. A Mormon offered his vote in Daviess county, and was denied that sacred privilege. Why? Because he was a Mormon! Will the citizens of this republic believe such a shameful tale of any portion of the people? and yet it is true! They tell us we ought to confine ourselves to Caldwell county! Good God! Are we living under the free institutions of republican A,erica; or has our government been transformed to a Tirkish despotism? Confined to Caldwell county! And why so? Has not a Mormon a right, like any other citizen, to go where he chooses, so [long as] he [molests] no one? Is he not in the enjoyment of the privileges of an American citizen, and is he not under the protection of the same laws! In the name of common sense, in the name of freedom and humanity, why should he be deprived of these privileges and this protection? How can the free and maganimous people of this country -- throughout its wide extent -- keep silent under such monstrous outrages of our common rights and common liberties! Why, they poured out volumes of sighs and imprecations over poor Poland and Greece -- have they none left in behalf of their own countrymen? The Mormons do expect that the people of the United States will show their detestation of these monstrous violations of law and right -- this wilful, shameless trampling on the charter of our liberties. Are we to be hunted down like hares -- driven off -- trampled under foot -- our property destroyed -- the fruits of our hard, laborious and painful industry wrested from us -- our homes taken and ourselves butchered, without a word even of sympathy from the American people? Are all the people willing to join the few, who are in our neighborhood, and justify this perpetual crusading against our property, firesides and families? Will the legislature, now about to sit, pass over these outrages in silence? We shall see.

Meanwhile, Mr. Editor, the Mormons wish only a fair investigation. They do not shrink from proper enquiry -- come how and when it may. And they ask the press of Missouri to do them justice. This is all the Mormons ask, and we sincerely hope their enemies will not be able to deprive them of that.
                                                                A MORMON.

P. S. I have adopted the signature of A Mormon in compliance with common usage; altho' our true appalation is "Latter Day Saints."


Note 1: The precise text of this issue's reports in uncertain. No copy of The Missourian of the 27th is known to have been preserved -- possibly this was an "Extra" issued from the paper's office in Fayette. The wording presented above is derived from reprints in other newspapers, such as the Nov. 10, 1838 number of the Peoria Register and the St. Louis Gazette of Nov. 1, 1838.

Note 2: The unnamed witness from Daviess County, whose letter was published by the Missourian, was William P. Penniston, Esq., a Whig lawyer and politician. The original of his letter (matching the published text in all essential features) has been preserved in the Missouri State Archives. Penniston was an avowed anti-Mormon, so LDS historians are not quick to accept his version of events in Daviess. Still, Penniston's letter was written when timely verification of his allegations, by disinterested observers, was a real possibility, and it is not likely that he strayed too far from the truth in providing his description of the Mormon depredations at Gallatin, etc.

Note 3: The unnamed "Mormon" who wrote from Far West, on Sept. 21, was very likely Sidney Rigdon. The style and content is similar to his bombastic pleadings for the "Latter Day Saints," as published in other, near contemporary sources.


 


MISSOURI  WATCHMAN.
Vol. ?                       Jefferson City, Mo., Monday, Oct. 29, 1838.                       No. ?



[MORMON  TROUBLES.]

We have been requested by the Governor to publish an extra of our paper, giving the public the intelligence which he, on yesterday, received in relation to our Mormon difficulties. WE are also informed that a force of three thousand men have been ordered to be raised and to march immediately to the aid of the suffering inhabitants. The outrages of the Mormons are of a character nevere before witnessed in a civilized country. They have now placed themselves in an attitude of open defiance to the laws of the land. The contents of the letters published below show, that they have driven the inhabitants of Daviess country from their homes, pillaged and burned their dwellings, driven off their cattle, and have taken the lives of our people. They will now be dealt with as enemies and traitors to the country.



MEETING  OF  THE  CITIZENS  OF  RAY  COUNTY.

At a very numerous public meeting held at the Court House, in Richmond, Ray county, on Wednesday the 24th day of October, 1838, for the purpose of considering the difficulties with the Mormons.

The object of the meeting having been explaiend by Thomas C. Burch, Esq., the following resolutions were unimously adopted, after reading the report of Charles R. Morhead, William Thornton, and Jacob Gudgel, which is hereto attached, to-wit:

Resolved, That the report here made by Charles R. Morhead, William Thornton, and Jacob Gudgel, Esqrs., be transmitted by express to the Governor of this state, together with these resolutions.

Resolved, That this meeting have the most implicit confidence in said report, as well from the known veracity of said gentlemen, as from numerous other facts and circumstances in our knowledge corroborating the same.

Resolved, That in the opinion of this meeting the time has arrived when it is the imperious duty of the Executive, by an armed force, to quell the insurrection put on foot by the Mormons; and that to effect the same, the civil authorities are wholly inadequate.

Resolved, That Wiley C. Williams and Amos Rees, Esqrs. be requested to visit the Governor and lay before him the proceedings of this meeting and urge upon him the necessity of ordering out, forthwith, an armed force against the Mormons, sufficient to meet the emergency.

Resolved, That we view with the utmost concern the conduct of the Mormons in the counties of Daviess and Livingston; and that immediate action is necessary for the protection of our property and houses from this lawless banditti.

Resolved, That heretofore, as citizens desiring to abide by the laws of the land, we have been disposed to see this people called Mormons dealt with for their offences by the civil authorities; but, that in the opinion of this meeting, from their past and present lawless course, a resort to the laws will be more than useless, and wholly insufficient to afford the country that protection to which it is entitled.

Resolved, That we appeal to the Governor of this state to give the people of upper Missouri protection from this fearful body of thieves and robbers.

Resolved, That it would, at this time, be inexpedient to take any offensive step, but that we should, at present, act on the defensive.

Resolved, That all who have in good faith renounced the Mormon religion, should be protected, either those in this county or in Caldwell, during the present excitement.

Resolved, That some men should now be raised to go to the northern border of this county, and guard it from intrusion by the Mormons; to act entirely on the defensive for the present, and that Gen. Parks be requested to raise three companies for that purpose, or that they be raised by volunteers.

REPORT.      

The undersigned having, on Monday morning last, learned that the Mormons had burned Millport in Daviess county (in addition to the burning of Stolling's store in Gallatin, in said county,) and of their having threatened to burn the store in Bancombe Settlement in this county, and feeling an anxiety to know the truth in relation to said reports, left this place, (Richmond,) on that (Monday) morning and proceeded to Milport; they, however, previously called at Judge Morin's, who lives about one fourth of a mile from Millport, who informed them that all they had learned was substantially true, and that much more had been done by the Mormons than the people of this county had been informed of. He went with us to Millport, where we found all the houses in ashes, except a grocery store house belonging to a Mr. Slade, and a house in which Mr. Wilson McKinney had resided. We also found the house of Mr. Robert Peniston, near Millport burned. The horse-mill belonging to him (Peniston) was taken downl the stones, bolting chest, &c. lying out some distance from the shed, and the shed yet standing. Mr. Morin informed us that the burning was done on Saturday night last, that on the next day he saw Mormons there, and saw them taking off beds and other things belonging to Wilson McKinney. We also saw some furniture, which we understood from Mr. Morin, belonged to Mr. McKinney, standing out in the commons, and which seemed to have been rifled of its contents. Mr. Morin expected, on the day we were there, that the Mormons would be there (at Millport) to move off the remaining property and to burn the balance of the houses. He stated to us that he considered his situation a precarious one. That he had been permitted to stay thus long owing to his having no wagon to move with; but that he expected to get wagons that day and he intended moving into Richmond immediately. He said that the county was entirely deserted by the inhabitants, except himself and a few others, besides the Mormons, and expressed it as his belief that the corn from his house to Diamon would all be gathered and hauled into Diamon by the Mormons, in 48 hours from that time. He also stated to us that he was at Diamon a few days previously, and saw a company of the men (Mormons) come into camp with a drove of cattle amounting to about 100 head, which he supposed to be other citizens. He also saw a negro man in the possession of a Mormon which he was very certain belonged to William Morgan, a citizen of Daviess county. Mr. Morin looked upon those Mormons who were then at Diamon, amounting he supposed, to about 600 men, as a band of robbers and desperadoes. He advised us very strongly to go no further; not to attempt to go to Diamon or Far West; that we would gather nothing by doing so in addition to what we there learned. That the country on the north side of Grand River and west of him was certainly deserted, except by the Mormons, and had been for several days; and that the houses were all burned; or to use his own words, that it was a "complete waste." Mr. Morin also informed us that the Mormons had ordered the other citizens out of the county, and that he too had his orders to leave. He appeared very anxious that we should not be seen at his house by any Mormon, and that it should not be known that he had given any information or expressed any thing unfavorable toward them, until he got away. We did not visit Gallatin, but understood from Mr. Morin and others, whom we met moving into this county, that all the houses in that place were burned, except a shoemaker's shop belonging to Mr. Runville.
C. R. MOREHEAD,            
WM. THORNTON,            
JACOB GUDGEL.            
Richmond, Mo., Wednesday, Oct. 24, 1838.                        



LETTER  FROM  JUDGE  KING.

Richmond, Oct. 24, 1838.        
DEAR SIR. -- As Mr. Williams will be to see you in reference to our Mormon difficulties and I will be able to say all to you, perhaps that can be said, I have deemed it a duty notwithstanding to give you such information as I have sought and obtained, and it is such that I assure you may be relied on. Our relations with the Mormons are such that I am perfectly satisfied that the arm of the civil authority is too weak to give peace to the country. Until lately I thought the Mormons were disposed to act on the defensive: but their recent conduct shows that they are the aggressors, and that they intend to take the law into their own hands. Of their recent outrages in Daviess, you have probably heard much already. Of their course and conduct in Daviess, I will give you the general facts, for to give particulars would far transcend the limits of a letter. On Sunday, before they marched to Daviess, Jo Smith made known his views to the people, and declared the time had come when they would avenge their own wrongs, and that all who were not for them, and taken up arms with them, should be considered as against them, that their property should be confiscated, and their lives also forfeited.

With this declaration and much else said by Smith, calculated to excite the people present, the next day was set to meet and see who was for them and who against them; and under such severe penalties, that there was none, I learn, who did not turn out; and about 3 or 400 men with Smith at their head marched to Daviess. This was on Tuesday; the next day was the snow storm, and on Thursday they commenced their ravages upon the citizens, driving them from their homes and taking their property. Between 80 and 100 men went to Gallatin, pillaged houses and the store of Mr. Stollings and the post-office, and then burnt the houses. They carried off the spoils on horseback and in wagons, and now have them, I understand, in a store house, near their camp. Houses have been robbed of their contents; beds, clothing, furniture, &c. and all deposited, as they term it, "a consecration to the Lord." At this time, there is not a citizen in Daviess, except Mormons. Many have been driven without warning, others have been allowed a few hours to start. This stock of citizens have been seized upon, killed up and salted by hundreds; from 50 to 100 wagons are now employed in hauling in the corn from the surrounding country. They look for a force against them, and are consequently preparing for a seige; building block-houses, &c. They have lately organized themselves into a band of what they call "Danites," and sworn to support their leading men in all they say or do, right or wrong; and further, to put to instant death those who will betray them. There is another band of twelve, called the "Destructives," whose duty it is to watch the movements of men and of communities, and to avenge themselves for supposed wrongful movements against them, by privately burning houses, property, and even laying in ashes towns, &c.

I find I am running out my letter too much in detail. I do not deem it necessary to give you a minute detail of all the facts, of which I am possessed, but I give you the above in order that you may form some idea of the disposition of these people. The Mormons expect to settle the affair at the point of the sword, and I am well warranted in saying to you that the people in this quarter of the state look to you for that protection which they believe you will afford when you have learned the facts. I do not pretend to advise your course, nor make any suggestions other than what I have stated; that it is utterly useless for the civil authorities to pretend to interpose. The country is in great commotion, and I can assure you that either with or without authority, something will shortly have to be done.

I hope you will let me hear from you by the return of Mr. Williams, and if you should come up [to] the country shortly it will give me pleasure to take the trouble to see you.
I am very respectfully,         
AUSTIN A. KING.   



Lexington, 6 o'clock P.M.        
Oct. 25, 1838.      
GENTLEMEN:-- This letter is sent after you on express. by Mr. Wm. Bryant of Ray county. Since you left us this morning, Mr. C. R. Morehead came here on express for men to assist in repelling a threatened attack upon Richmond tonight. He brought news that the Mormon armed force had attacked Capt. Bryant this morning at daylight, and had cut off his whole company of 50 men. Since Mr. Morehead left Richmond, one of the company (Bogart,) had come in and reported that there were ten of his comrades killed, and the remainder were taken prisoners; after many of them had been severely wounded. He stated further that Richmond would be sacked and burned by the Mormon banditti tonight. Nothing can exceed the consternation which this news gave rise to. The women and children are flying from Richmond in every direction. A number of them have repaired to Lexington, amongst whom is Mrs. Rees. We will have sent from this county, since 2 o'clock this evening, about one hundred well armed and daring men, perhaps the most effective that our county can boast of. They will certainly give them (the Mormons) a warm reception at Richmond to-night. You will see the necessity of hurrying on to the City of Jefferson and also of imparting correct information to the public as you go along.

My impression is that you had better send one of your number to Howard, Cooper and Boone counties, in order that volunteers may be getting ready and flocking to the scene of trouble as fast as possible. They must make haste and put a stop to the devastation which is menaced by these infuriated fanatics. And they must go prepared, and with the full determination to exterminate or expel them from the State enmasse. Nothing but this can give tranquillity to the public mind and re-establish the supremacy of the law. There must be no more dallying with this question any where. The Mormons must leave the State, or we will one and all. And to this complexion it must come at last.

We have great reliance upon your ability, discretion and fitness for the task you have undertaken, and have only time to say God speed you.
Yours truly,           
      E. M. RYLAND.   
Messrs Amos Rees & W. C. Williams.


Note 1: The title and the precise text of this extra's report in uncertain. No copy of Missouri Watchman of the 29th is known to have been preserved. The text was re-constructed from various reprints, such as the Nov. 19, 1838 number of the Gettysburg Adams Sentinel, the Nov. 10, 1838 Indianapolis Indiana Journal, the Baltimore American, etc.

Note 2: The files of the Missouri Watchman are incomplete and not easily accessible; it was a weekly paper, published at Jefferson City by Hammond & Cronenbold. It was started on Mar. 29, 1838, a few months before the "Mormon War" began in upper Missouri.


 


THE  MISSOURIAN.
Vol. ?                       Fayette, Howard Co., Mo., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1838.                       No. ?


 

MARCHING OF THE TROOPS. -- A portion of our edition of Saturday having laid over until this morning (Monday,) we throw out some paragraphs in order to make room for the following synopsis of the progress of affairs since the meeting of Friday night. At the adjourned meeting of Saturday, General Clark read a despatch which he was on the eve of starting to the Governor by express in which he informed the Commander in Chief, that under the extingencies of the occasion, he had so far anticipated his orders as to direct the raising of 600 mounted gunmen from his division, to be organized on yesterday -- and to march this morning. This number was increased by a vote of the meeting to one thousand.

Too much credit cannot be awarded to Mr. P. Wilson, who [brot?] this despatch as far as Marion, where meeting the Governor's express, he returned with the official orders of the Governor in less than 18 hours, 12 hours of which were night work, besides the unusual delays in crossing the Missouri. The distance (going and coming) is about 100 miles.

The orders of the Governor confer the most plenary authority on General Clark to close this wild and fearful strife -- even by extermination if necessary. -- Between two and three thousand men from the divisions of General Wilcock, Grant and Atchison are to rendezvous at Richmond with all possible celerity, and report themselves to Gen. Clark, who is directed to assume the command. Rumors of still more barbarous atrocity -- butchering and hanging, burning and destroying, continue to multiply with hours, but as they are not official, we forbear their repetition. -- Enough is known to justify all that has been done -- and the Howard regiments, composed exclusively of volunteers, are on the march with as chivalrous a christian leader as ever warred against a Moslem.


Note: The precise text of this issue's reports in uncertain. No copy of The Missourian of the 30th is known to have been preserved -- possibly this was an "Extra" issued from the paper's office in Fayette. The wording presented above is derived from reprints in other newspapers, such as the New York Auburn Journal of Nov. 21, 1838 (reprinting the St. Louis Gazette of Nov. 1).


 


Vol. 10.                           Jefferson City,  November 3, 1838.                          No. 577.



The Mormon War  again.
DISTRESSING  NEWS.

It is with the most heartfelt regret, we this week [spread] before our readers the reality of all the accusations against this deluded and troublesome people, who are ravaging the counties of Daviess and Caldwell and carrying destruction and consternation along with their movements. After reading the following documents which we have been politely favored with, can a feeling and patriotic people "long debate" what course to pursue? We will answer no! The country is already in arms and are marching to the relief of their distressed fellow-citizens. Our county has met the full requisition of the Governor, and her troops are already on the wing, the mounted troops from Gasconade left here on yesterday about 100 in number, well armed and equipped for a siege such as they will most likely encounter: --

Hostilities renewed by the Mormons! Houses burnt, &c!
MEETING  OF  THE  CITIZENS  OF  RAY  COUNTY.

At a very numerous Public Meeting, held at the Court House, in Richmond, Ray county, on Wednesday, the 24th day of October, 1838, for the purpose of taking into consideration the difficulties with the Mormons: --

The object of the meeting having been explained by Thomas C. Burch, Esq., the following resolutions were unanimously adopted, after reading the report of Charles R. Morehead, William Thornton, and Jacob Gudgel, Esq'rs., which is hereto attached: To wit:

Resolved, That the report here made by Charles R. Morehead, William Thoenton and Jacob Gudgel, Esq'rs., be transmitted by express to the Governor of this State together with these resolutions:

Resolved, That this meeting have the most implicit confidence in said report, as well from the known veracity of said gentlemen, as from numerous other facts and circumstances in our knowledge corroborating the same.

Resolved, That in the opinion of this meeting the time has arrived when it is the imperious duty of the Executive, by an armed force to quell, the insurrection put on foot by the Mormons; and that to effect the same, the Civil Authorities are wholly inadequate.

Resolved, That Wiley C. Williams and Amos Rees, Esq'rs., be requested to visit the Governor and lay before him the proceedings of this meeting and urge upon him the necessity of ordering out, forthwith, an armed force against the Mormons, sufficient to meet the emergency.

Resolved, That we view with the utmost concern the conduct of the Mormons in the counties of Daviess and Livingston and that immediate action is necessary for the protection of our property and houses from this lawless banditti.

Resolved, That heretofore, as citizens desiring to abide by the laws of the land, we have been disposed to see this people called Mormons dealt with for their offences by the civil authorities; but, that in the opinion of this meeting, from their past and present lawless course a resort to the laws will be more than useless, and wholly insufficient to afford the country that protection to which it is entitled.

Resolved, That we appeal to the Governor of this State to give the people of upper Missouri protection from this fearful body of thieves and robbers.

Resolved, That it would, at this time, be inexpedient to rake any offensive step, but that we should, at present, act on the defensive.

Resolved, That all who have in good faith renounced the Mormon religion, should be protected, either those in this county or in Caldwell, during the present excitement.

Resolved, That some men should now be raised to go to the northern border of this county, and guard it from intrusion by the Mormons, to act [entirely] on the defensive for the present, and that Gen. Parks be requested to raise three companies for that purpose, or that they be raised by volunteers.

REPORT.      

The undersigned having, on Monday morning last, learned that the Mormons had burned Millport in Daviess county (in addition to the burning of Stolling's store in Gallatin, in said county,) and of their having threatened to burn the store in Bancombe Settlement in this county, and feeling an anxiety to know the truth in relation to said reports, left this place, Richmond, on that (Monday) morning and proceeded to Milport -- they, however, previously called at Judge Morin's, who lives about one-fourth of a mile from Millport, who informed them that all they had learned was substantially true, and that much more had been done by the Mormons than the people of this county had been informed of. He went with us to Millport, where we found all the houses in ashes, except a grocery store house belonging to a Mr. Slade, and a house in which Mr. Wilson McKinney had resided. We also found the house of Mr. Robert Peniston, near Millport burned. The horse-mill belonging to him (Peniston), was taken down -- the stones, bolting chest, &c., lying out some distance from the shed, and the shed yet standing. Mr. Morin informed us that the burning was done on Saturday night last, that on the next day he saw Mormons there, and saw them taking off beds and other things belonging to Wilson McKinney.

We also saw some furniture which we understood from Mr. Morin, belonged to Mr. M'Kinney, standing out in the commons, and which seemed to have been rifled of its contents. Mr. Morin expected, on the day we were there, that the Mormons would be there (at Millport) to move off the remaining property and to burn the balance of the houses. He stated to us that he considered his situation a precarious one. That he had been permitted to stay thus long owing to his having no wagon to move with; but that he expected to get wagons that day and he intended moving into Richmond immediately. He said that the county was entirely deserted by the inhabitants, except himself and a few others, besides the Mormons, and expressed it as his belief that the corn from his house to Diamon would all be gathered and hauled into Diamon by the Mormons, in 48 hours from that time. He also stated to us that he was at Diamon a few days previously, and saw a company of the men (Mormons) come into camp with a drove of cattle amounting to about 100 head, which he supposed to be other citizens. He also saw a negro man in the possession of a Mormon which he was very certain belonged to William Morgan, a citizen of Daviess county. Mr. Morin looked upon those Mormons who were then at Diamon, (amounting he supposed, to about 600 men,) as a band of robbers and desperadoes. He advised us very strongly to go no further; not to attempt to go to Diamon or Far West; that we would gather nothing by doing so in addition to what we there learned. That the country on the north side of Grand River west of him was certainly deserted, except by the Mormons, and had been for several days; and that the houses were all burned -- or to use his own words, that it was a "complete waste." Mr. Morin also informed us that the Mormons had ordered the other citizens out of the county, and that he too had his orders to leave. He appeared very anxious that we should not be seen at his house by any of the Mormons; and that it should not be known that he had given any information or expressed any thing unfavorable toward them, until he got away. We did not visit Gallatin, but understood from Mr. Morin and others whom we met moving into this county, that all the houses in that place were burned, except a shoe-maker's shop belonging to Mr. Runville.

C. R. MOREHEAD,            
WM. THORNTON,            
JACOB GUDGEL.            
Richmond, Mo., Wednesday, Oct. 24, 1838.                        





LETTER  FROM  JUDGE  KING.

Richmond, Oct. 24, 1838.        

DEAR SIR. -- As Mr. Williams will be to see you in reference to our Mormon difficulties, I will be able to say all to you perhaps that can be said. I deem it a duty notwithstanding to give you such information as I have sought and obtained, & is such I assure you may be relied on. Our relations with the Mormons are such that I am perfectly satisfied that the arm of the civil authority is too weak to give peace to the country. Until lately I thought the Mormons were disposed to act on the defensive: but their recent conduct shows that they are the aggressors, and that they intend to take the law into their hands. Of their recent outrages in Daviess, you have probably heard much already. I will give you the general facts, however. On Sunday before they marched to Daviess, Jo Smith made known his views to the people, and declared the time had come when they would avenge their own wrongs, and that all who were not for them, and taken up arms with them, should be considered as against them, that their property should be confiscated, and their lives also forfeited.

With this declaration and much else said by Smith, calculated to excite the people present -- the next day was set [apart] to see who was for them and who against them; and under such severe penalties, that there was some, I learn, who did not turn out; and about 3 or 400 men, with Smith at their head, marched to Daviess. This was on Tuesday; the next day was the snow storm, and on Thursday they commenced their ravages upon the citizens, driving them from their homes and taking their property. Between 80 and 100 men went to Gallatin, pillaged houses and the store of Mr. Stollings and the post-office, and then burnt the houses. They carried off the spoils on horseback and in wagons, and now have them, I understand, in a store house, near their camp. Houses have been robbed of their contents, -- beds, clothing, furniture, &c. and all deposited, as they term it, "a consecration to the Lord." At this time, there is not a citizen in Daviess, except Mormons. Many have been driven without warning, others have been allowed a few hours to start. This stock of citizens have been seized upon, killed [up] and salted by hundreds; from 50 to 100 wagons are now employed in hauling in the corn from the surrounding country. They look for a force against them, and are consequently preparing for a seige -- building block houses, &c. They have lately organized themselves into a band of what they call "Danites," and sworn to support their leading men in all they say or do, right or wrong -- and further, to put to instant death those who will betray them. There is another band of twelve, called the "Destructives," whose duty it is to watch the movements of men and of communities, and to avenge themselves for supposed wrongful movements against them, by privately burning houses and property, and even laying in ashes towns, &c.

I find I am running out my letter too much in detail. I do not deem it necessary to give you a minute detail of all the facts of which I am possessed, but I give you the above in order that you may form some idea of the disposition of these people. The Mormons expect to settle the affair at the point of the sword, and I am well warranted in saying to you that the people in this quarter of the state look to you for that protection which they believe you will afford when you have learned the facts. I do not pretend to advise your course, nor make any suggestions other than what I have stated, that it is utterly useless for the civil authorities to pretend to intercede. The country is in great commotion and I can assure you that either with or without authority, something will shortly have to be done.

I hope you will let me hear from you by the return of Mr. Williams, and if you should come up [to] the country shortly, it will give me pleasure to take the trouble to see you.   I am very respectfully,
                                 AUSTIN A KING.



Lexington, 6 o'clock P.M.        
October 25, 1838.        

GENTLEMEN:-- This letter is sent after you on express by Mr. William Bryant of Ray county. Since you left us this morning, Mr. R. Morehead came here on express for men to assist in repelling a threatened attack upon Richmond tonight. He brought news that the Mormon armed force had attacked Capt. Bogart this morning at daylight, and had cut off his whole company of 50 men. Since Mr. Morehead left Richmond, one of the company (Bogart.) had come in and reported that there were ten of his comrades killed, and the remainder were taken prisoners after many of them had been severely wounded. He stated further that Richmond would be sacked and burned by the Mormon Banditti tonight. Nothing can exceed the consternation which this news gave rise to. The women and children are flying from Richmond in every direction. A number of them have repaired to Lexington, amongst whom is Mrs. Rees. We will have sent from this county, since 1 o'clock this evening about 100 well-armed and daring men, perhaps the most effective that our county can boast of. They will certainly give them (the Mormons) a warm reception at Richmond to-night. You will see the necessity of hurrying on to the City of Jefferson and also of imparting correct information to the public as you go along.

My impression is that you had better send one of your number to Howard, Cooper and Boone Counties, in order that volunteers may be getting ready and flocking to the scene of trouble as fast as possible. They must make haste and put a stop to the devastation which is menaced by these infuriated fanatics. And they must go prepared, and with the full determination to exterminate or expel them from the State en masse. Nothing but this can give tranquillity to the public mind and reestablish the supremacy of the law. There must be no further delaying with this question anywhere. The Mormons must leave the State, or we will one and all. And to this complexion it must come at last. We have great reliance upon your ability, direction and fitness for the task you have undertaken, and have only time to say God speed you.   Yours truly,
                                                E. M. RYLAND.

Messrs Amos Rees & W. C. Williams.



STILL  LATER  FROM  THE  WAR.

In addition to the foregoing, the Governor yesterday received an express from Gen'ls Atchison and Lucas, confirming the above statements. The Mormons are now in a perfect state of rebellion, and are beyond all doubt the aggressors, setting the laws of the country at defiance. The express from Gen. Atchison brought also a communication from Gen. Clark, with information that he was then on his way to the seat of war with five hundred men -- that five hundred more were to join him that day; he is doubtless by this time at Richmond.

The Mormons are now acting out to the letter the threats they have made during the past summer. Judge King's letter is very full and explicit; indeed, the most undoubted evidence is now in possession of the Governor, that after having reconciled their differences with the people of Faviess, and after the militia which had been called out to quell the disturbances had returned to their homes, the Mormons, with an armed force of three or four hundred men, with Jo Smith at their head, without ant provocation went from Caldwell county to Daviess county, and commenced driving the inhabitants from their homes, pillaging and then burning their houses, driving off their cattle, and destroying and taking off their crops.

The inhabitants of Daviess are really in a wretched condition, driven from their homes, without any thing but the bare clothing on their backs, their means of subsistence taken from them, and that too at the commencement of winter. Many families have been left without a second suit to their backs, and without a bed to lie on. Numbers of them must become dependent on the kindness and charity of the people of the neighboring counties, whither they have fled. The conduct of the Mormons throughout, is sufficient to convince every unprejudiced mind that no such combination should be permitted to exist in a government like ours.

The command of all the trops raised for this service has been assigned to Major Gen'l Clark, of Howard county, who is vested with full power to subdue the insurgents and return quiet to the country.

The troops of Cole, Gasconade and Franklin counties, about 400 in number, (now on their march,) are under the command of Brig. Gen'l. White, of this county.

We shall endeavor to obtain, and give our readers the earliest intelligence in relation to this unfortunate war.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. III.                           Jackson,  Missouri,  November 3, 1838.                           No. 48.


 

==> By the following paragraph from the Evening Gazette published in St. Louis, it will be seen that the Mormon difficulties are not yet at an end,

BATTLE  WITH  THE  MORMONS.

By a passenger on board the Ashley, this evening, from Missouri river, we learn that a conflict had taken place between the Mormons and their enemies; that the former had four killed, the latter two wounded; and that no Mormons had retreated from Dewitt.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. III.                             Liberty,  Missouri,  Nov. 3, 1838.                             No. ?



(General Atchison returns from Caldwell Co.
under construction)




Note: The exact title and content of the above news item are not yet determined -- the citation comes from the St. Louis Missouri Republican of Nov. 13, 1838.


 


THE  WESTERN  STAR.
Vol. ?                           Liberty,  Missouri,  November 6?, 1838.                           No. ?


 

The course of Gov. Boggs, in superseding Gen. Atchison, we hear much complaint about. Why the Gov. did this we are at a loss to know. So far as we have heard an expression of opinion, the people appear to be satisfied with Mr. A. as a General...


Note: The exact date of the above news item has not yet been determined.


 


Vol. III.                           Jackson,  Missouri,  November 10, 1838.                           No. 49.


 

MORMON WAR. -- Our latest intelligence in regard to the Mormon troubles in this State, which, it was thought, were about to terminate without serious consequences, is truly alarming. The most intense excitement prevails throughout the whole district of country, (embracing several counties) subject to the enrages of this band of infuriated fanatics. They attempt open defiance of the laws of the land, driving the inhabitants of the county from their homes, plundering [------ -----] their dwellings, and [----- ------ ------ ----] and other property.

It is reported that they have burnt the county seat of Daviess county, and have made an attack upon Richmond the seat of justice of Ray county. There are various accounts of the loss of lives on the part of our citizens, that are probably [true?] but exaggerated; but there seems to be very little doubt that some of our people have been killed in recent skirmishes.

The Governor, was [------ -----], has issued orders for 3000 mounted men to report to the scene of war, and the citizens of several adjacent counties, are promptly volunteering their services.

In order that our enemies mat form a tolerably correct idea of the real state of affairs, we give below a letter written by the Hon. Austin A. King, judge of the Judicial Circuit in which the Mormons reside.


LETTER  FROM  JUDGE  KING.
                          Richmond, October 24, 1838.

Dear Sir: As Mr. Williams will be to see you in reference to our Mormon difficulties, and will be able to say to you perhaps all that can be said, I have deemed it my duty notwithstanding, to give you such information as I have sought and obtained; and it is such that I assure you may be relied on. Our relations with the Mormons are such, that I am perfectly satisfied that the arm of the Executive authority is too weak to give peace to the country. Until lately, I thought the Mormons were disposed to act only on the defensive; but their recent conduct shows that they are the aggressors, that they intend to take the law into their own hands. Of their recent outrages in Daviess you have doubtless heard much already. Of their course of conduct there I will give you the general facts, for to give particulars would far transcend the contents of a letter. On Sunday, before they marched into Daviess, Jo Smith made known his views to the people, and declared the time had come when they would avenge their own wrongs, and that all who were not for them, [and take up arms with them, should be considered as against them], that their property should be confiscated and their lives also be forfeited.

With this declaration and much else said by Smith, calculated to excite the people present -- the next day was set to meet and see who was for them and who against them, and render such severe penalties, there was none, that I learn, who did not turn out, and about 3 or 400 men, with Smith at their head, marched to Daviess. This was on Tuesday; the next day was the snow storm, and on Thursday they commenced their ravages upon the citizens, driving them from their houses and taking their property. Between 80 and 100 men went to Gallatin, pillaged houses and the store of Mr. Stollings and the post-office, and then burnt the houses. They carried off the spoils on horse back and [in] wagons and now have them, I understand, in a storehouse near their camp. Houses have been robbed of their contents -- beds, clothing, furniture &c. and all deposited, and they term it, "a consecration to the Lord." -- At this time there is not a citizen in Daviess except Mormons. Many have been driven without warning, others have been allowed a few hours to start. The stock of the citizens have been seized upon, killed and salted [up] by hundreds; and from 50 to 100 waggons are now employed in hauling in the corn from the surrounding country. They look for a force against them, and [are] consequently preparing for a seige, building block houses &c. They have lately organized themselves into a band of what they call "Danites," and sworn to support their leading men in all they say or do, right or wrong, -- and further, to put to instant death those who will betray them. There is another band of twelve, called the "Destructives,"whose duty it is to watch the movements of men and of communities, and to avenge themselves for supposed wrongful movements against them, by privately burning houses, property, and even laying in ashes towns, &c.

I find I am running out my letter too much in detail. I do not deem itnecessary to give you a minute detail of all the facts of which I am possessed, but I give you the above in order that you may form some idea of the disposition of these people. The Mormons expect to settle the affair at the point of the sword, and I am well warranted in saying to you that the people in this quarter of the State look to you for that protection, which they believe you will afford, when you have learned the facts. I do not pretend to advise your course, nor make any suggestions other than what I have stated, that it is utterly useless for the civil authorities to pretend to interpose. The Country is in great commotion, and I can assure you that either with or without authority, something will shortly have to be done.

I hope you will let me hear from you by the return of Mr. Williams, and if you should come up to the country shortly, it will give me pleasure to take the trouble to see you.

                I am very respectfully,
                                AUSTIN A. KING.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 10.                       Jefferson City,  November 10, 1838.                       No. 578.



(Gen. Lucas had captures 400 Mormons at Far West
under construction)




Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. III.                           Liberty,  Missouri,  Nov. 10, 1838.                           No. ?



(Article title not yet located -- under construction)

Just as our paper was going to press, we received a communication from Gen'l Lucas, giving the stipulations of the treaty made by him and the Mormons. It will be recollected that we stated that General Atchison and his staff returned home, having considered himself virtually ordered from the field by Gov. Boggs; who assigned the command to Gen. Clarke of Howard county. Gen. Lucas was in command of the troops previous to and at the time of the surrender of the Mormons. -- The matter was entirely settled before the arrival of General Clarke. -- What motive could have operated on Gov. Boggs for excluding Gen. Atchison from any command, we do not pretend to know, but this we do know, that he has done himself very little credit, by so illiberal a course of procedure.

Gen. Lucas states that the officers and men under his command conducted themselves in a manner that will ever recommend them to his highest approbation. We are sorry our space and time will not permit us to make any further remarks. The following are the stipulations between the parties:

1st. To give up their leaders to be tried and punished.

2nd. To make an appropriation of the peoperty of all who had taken up arms, for the payment of the debts, and as indemnity for damages done by them.

3d. That the Mormons should all leave the State and be protected out by the militia; but to remain under protection, until further orders from the Commander-in-Chief.

4th. To give up all arms of every discription, to be receipted for.

For the purpose of arranging every thing in a proper and legal way, Gen. Lucas left Col. Williams, aid-de-camp to the commander-in-chief, Col. Burch, and Major A. Ries of Ray county, to attend to drawing, writing &c. with a company of men to execute all orders consistent with the stipulations.

Judge Cameron of Clay county, William Collins of Jackson, George Woodward of Ray, John Carroll and W. W. Phelps, of Far West, were appointed by Gen. Lucas and Col. Hinkle, the commander of the Mormons, to attend to the adjusting of all claims, &c. ...

There will be a dinner given to General Atchison on Monday next at the Liberty Hotel, as a tribute of the high regard and esteem entertained for his personal character, and his meritorious and prudent course in the late difficulties with the Mormons. The citizens of this, and the surrounding counties are respectfully invited.


Note: The title and full content of the above news item are not yet determined -- the text comes from the St. Louis Missouri Republican of Nov. 17, 1838.


 


Vol. 1.                             Boonville,  November 15, 1838.                             No. 30.


 

Just as our paper was going to press, a portion of the Guards have returned from the Mormon war, from whom we have gathered a few particulars. Our informant[s] state that Jo Smith and the other leaders, are to be put on their trial at Richmond, Ray county, and 47 other Mormons are to be tried at the same place. It is not true that the Mormons are to be sent out of the State forthwith, but are allowed to remain at present with the distinct understanding that they are not to make another crop in Missouri, but to leave it between this and next summer. The forces are all disbanded and sent home, except one troop of cavalry from Cole county, which will be retained until the Mormon trials are over.

The Circuit Court for Ray County commenced its session on Monday the 11th inst., at which term it is expected, the trial of Joe Smith and other Mormons will come on. These facts may be relied on as true, as we have them from persons immediately from the spot, on whose statements reliance may be placed.


Note: The title and full content of the above news item are not yet determined -- the text comes from various reprint sources.


 


Vol. III.                           Jackson,  Missouri,  November 17, 1838.                           No. 50.


 

THE MORMONS. -- We are happy to learn that our difficulties with this deluded people, are probably ere now terminated. Our latest intelligence, derived from the "Jeffersonian Republican" of the 10th instant, justifies the belief; though we are really apprehensive, that there will be no permanent peace & tranquility in that quarter of the State, while these fanatics are permitted to remain.

We are informed by the "Jeffersonian" that General LUCAS had captured 400 Mormons, in an engagement at Far West, among whom was the ring-leader, Joe Smith, with four others of the principal offenders, who were, by orders of the Governor, to be delivered over to Gen. CLARK for safe keeping, until tried by the civil authority at Head Quarters in Richmond, Ray County.

We furthermore learn from the same paper, that an engagement had also taken place in Caldwell county, in which 35 Mormons were killed without any loss of our citizens. It is said too that they are fast leaving the State; and this in our opinion is their best policy.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


THE  WESTERN  STAR.
Vol. ?                           Liberty,  Missouri,  November 20, 1838.                           No. ?



(under construction)

Some twenty-five of thirty [Mormons] were discharged, and about thirty-five are retained for indictment and trial -- some for treason against the State, some for murder, some as accessories to murder, and some for arson, burglary, robbery and larceny. -- We are informed the testimony discloses many facts which have not yet been published to the world, but not deeming it proper to make them the subject of newspaper comment before the trials of the accused, we forbear their disclosure. We are not apprized with certainty what steps will be taken for the safe custody of the prisoners, but think it most probable they will be divided and sent to the jails of the most convenient counties having jails. They are at present under the guard of a part of Capt. Bogard's company of militia, Gen. Clark having disbanded all his troops by order of the Governor...


Note: The above article's title is unknown. See the St. Louis Missouri Republican of Dec. 8, 1838 for a paraphrase of the Star's report.


 


Vol. 10.                       Jefferson City,  November 21?, 1838.                       No. ?



MESSAGE.

Delivered to the Senate,
and House of Representatives:


... The difficulties which have taken place between the people called Mormons and the citizens of the adjoining counties, have recently assumed a most serious aspect. It was found necessary to call forth a portion of the militia to quiet these disturbances and to restore peace and order to the community. The troops engaged in this service (with the exception of a company or two retained? as a guard over the prisoners) have been discharged.

I have concluded to forbear making any further remarks on this subject at the present time as the matter is now undergoing a judicial investigation. I have directed the General officer who was placed in command of the troops raised for this service, to collect and [embody] all the facts in relation to the commencement, progress and termination of this unfortunate affair and report to me as early as possible, so that the subject may be placed before the legislature. I shall avail myself of the earliest opportunity after receiving his report, to lay the whole subject before you together with all the documents in relation to it in possession of the Executive. ...
                                  LILIBURN W. BOGGS.
City of Jefferson, 20th Nov., 1838.


Note: The usual Saturday date of publication for the Jeffersonian fell on Nov. 24th -- possibly the Governor's message was released in an "Extra" on Nov. 21st, however.


 


Vol. 10.                       Jefferson City,  December 8, 1838.                       No. 581.


 

THE MORMON DIFFICULTIES. -- Considerable time has been bestowed upon this subject during the past week by the General Assembly. A committee has been appointed to investigate the whole matter with the aid of all the documents in relation to the matter before them, and the power, as we understand, to send for persons and papers, if necessary. We have no doubt, but this exciting question will receive that investigation, which, after it is fairly laid before the committee, that its importance may seem to require.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 1.                             Boonville,  January 3, 1839.                             No. 37.


 

                                                    (FOR THE EMIGRANT)
     Messrs. Brent and Middleton:

SIRS: -- [introduction illegible in clipping]

MORMON  WAR.

Canto I.

(under construction)

... [most text illegible in this clipping]
...
         BARD OF BOONVILLE.

Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 1.                             Boonville,  January 10, 1839.                             No. 38.


 

                                                    (FOR THE EMIGRANT)
     Messrs. Brent and Middleton:

SIR: -- In consequence of my recent absence from home, together with other circumstances, the writing of the "II canto" of the "Mormon war, has been unavoidably delayed longer than I had expected; I trust it will yet be in season, and you will give it publicity through the medium of your valuable paper, which will much oblige.

                      Your friend
                         and humble servant,
                             THE BARD.

MORMON  WAR.

Canto II.

(under construction)

"Good morning kind readers, I hope and pray,
No one will take umbrage at ought I shall say,"
For a time, this war of excitement was o'er,
Smith, Rigdon, and White, were all bound to appear,
At the bar of Judge King, who their causes would hear...

... Thus the war's at an end -- the excitement is o'er,
And Smith's holy doctrine will flourish no more,
But I ask the kind reader, before I conclude,
)If you will not consider the enquiry rude,)
Should not those engaged in behalf of the State
To suppress this commotion, be paid a fair rate,
Though none fought and bled, but Bogart's small file,
While the rest were kept marching, and march'd all the while,
If so, I shall hope that the State Assembly,
When it passes a bill the soldiers to pay,
As a just compensation for marching the quill,
Will cast a few bits to the
         BARD OF BOONVILLE.

Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 12.                       Jefferson City,  January 12, 1839.                       No. 586.



The  Legislature.

In the Senate the Mormon question has again been under consideration, and, as usual, has been warmly debated. The resolutions adopted some time since by the House have received the sanction of the Senate; though the question has not yet been put to rest. For a bill will have to be introduced for the purpose of organizing and defining the duties of the commission which by the resolutions, is to be sent to the upper country to examine into the causes of the dispute between the Mormons and the citizens at large.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 1.                             Boonville,  January 17, 1839.                             No. 39.


 

Missouri Legislature. -- There has thus far been but little of the important business of the present session of our Legislature completed. The Mormon war business remains unfinished, the university bill undetermined...


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 12.                         Jefferson City,  January 19, 1839.                        No. 587.



CHARITON.

At a large and respectable meeting in Keytsville, of the Citizens of Chariton co., on Tuesday the first day of Jan. 1839, John B. Anderson was called to the chair, and Wm. Holland appointed secretary.

The object of the meeting was then explained, and upon motion Sterling Price, Wm. B. Broughton, Ransom Price, and Abrum Lock were appointed a committee to draft a preamble and resolutions, explanatory of the feelings [of the community?] with regard to the Mormon difficulty; who retired a short time, and returned with the following preamble and resolutions, to wit:

Whereas, a publication in the Missouri Republican, charging the citizens of Chariton county, with killing a citizen who was a Mormon, and in other ways maltreating the Mormons by destroying their property, &c. and many other charges calculated to reflect much dishonor upon our citizens. And whereas, it appears to this meeting that many citizens of our State, as well as a portion of our Legislature (strange as it may seem) are disposed to take sides with, and uphold that lawless set of fanatics, called Mormons...

(under construction)



Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 12.                       Jefferson City,  January 26, 1839.                       No. 588.



HOUSE.

                      Saturday, Jan. 19.

In the House among other business, Mr. Redman introduced a petition to prevent the sale of spirituous liquors near places of religious worship.

Mr. Chiles of Jackson, introduced a bill for the payment of the Militia and volunteers engaged in quelling the Mormon disturbances. The bill appropriates $150,000 for this purpose.

After some rather warm discussion, the bill was ordered to be read a third time on Monday. ...

After some remarks from Mr. Corrill, in which he spoke in terms of censure of the Mormon leaders, the vote was taken on the indefinite postponement and stood, Ayes -- 44, Nays -- 11. ...

                               Monday, Jan. 21.
... The bill appropriating money to pay the Militia and Volunteers called out into service of the State in quelling the Mormon disturbances was taken up. ...

                               Tuesday, Jan. 22.
... The bill appropriating $150,000 to pay the militia and volunteers engaged in quelling the Mormon disturbances was taken up. Messrs. Jackson of Howard, Clark of Line, Redman, Atchison, Chiles of Jackson, and Young of Lafayette, urged the passage of the bill. Messrs. Primm, Hall, Bollinger, Burckhardt and Geyser opposed it...

Petitions were presented by several members, one by Mr. Elston from a soldier, who lost his horse in the Mormon campaign; which was rejected. ...

                               Wednesday, Jan. 23.
Mr. Atchison reported a bill allowing a compensation of $500 to Wm. T. Wood, Esq., for services in prosecuting cases against the Mormons...

Mr, Atchison moved an amendment the purport of which was to authorize the judge of the circuit court to appoint an additional prosecuting attorney to prosecute the cases against the Mormons, and allow him a reasonable compensation. The amendment was adopted, and the bill was ordered to be read a third time tomorrow...



PUBLIC  SENTIMENT  AGAIN.

(under construction)




Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 12.                       Jefferson City,  February 2, 1839.                       No. 589.



THE  SOUTH.

We are gratified to find, in a late "Southern Advocate," language like the following; and doubly gratified are we to discover, the very respectable source from which it emanated. -- This letter was no doubt written through a desire to disabuse the public mind in the South, about a matter concerning which so much has been said. The object of the author is truly laudable.

                                            Jefferson City, Mo.,
                                            Dec. 20., 1838.

Messrs. Brown & Lindsey: --

Mr. Corril, the Mormon member so called; threw two firebrands into the House of Representatives yesterday morning, in the form of memorials to the General Assembly, asking the Legislature to rescind what they term the "exterminating order" issued by Governor Boggs,.and addressed to Major General Clark; to restore to them the arms taken by the Missouri volunteers...

(under construction)



Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 1.                           Boonville,  February 7, 1839.                           No. 43.



THE  MORMONS.

A friend has politely furnished us with the "Pittsburgh Saturday Evening Visitor," containing a statement of enormities said to have been committed on the Mormon prisoners at Far West, and believe the statement to be untrue, we consider it a duty we owe the people of Missouri to defend them against so foul a slander, as that contained in the letter making these charges. We do not apprehend that any individual in our state, will give the smallest credence to this slander, but it may [be] credited elsewhere. From the circumstance and mode adopted for propogating this terrible story; it would appear that the writer of the letter had an evil design, -- he dates his letter from Millersburg which is in Calaway County, and directs it to the editor of the Nashville Whig, and by the Whig it is published to the world, not however without expressing doubts of the truth of the story. Here it is:

"HORRIBLE REVELATIONS."

We find in the Nashville Whig, a letter from a correspondent of that paper, dated Millersburgh, from which we take the annexed extract, relating to the capture of the Mormons:

"The Mormons upon the approach of the mob, sent out a white flag, which being fired on by the mob, Jo Smith and Rigdon, and a few other Mormons of less influence, gave themselves up to the mob, with a view of so far appeasing their wrath as to save their women and children from violence. -- Vain hopes! The prisoners being secured, the mob entered the town and perpetrated every conceivable act of brutality and outrage -- forcing fifteen or twenty Mormon girls to yield to their brutal passions!! Of these things I was assured by many persons while I was at Far West, in whose veracity I have the utmost confidence; I conversed with many of the prisoners, who numbered about 800, among whom I recognized many old acquaintances, who had seen better days. There were many young and interesting girls among them, and I assure you a more distracted set of creatures I never saw. I assure you my dear sir, it was peculiarly heart-rending to see old grey headed fathers and mothers, young ladies and innocent babes, forced at this inclement season to abandon their warm houses, which were, in many cases greatly improved, and showed a high degree of refinement and civilization."
The above is a most horrible disclosure, and for the credit of human nature -- we are bound to believe it is untrue. We cannot believe, except on further evidence -- that we have in this State any demons in human form, who would be guilty of the atrocities related by this writer. If it were so, and there was not among us moral feeling enough to condemn, and moral power enough to punish, such unspeakable abominations then would the state be unfit for the residence of any human being, who, with the form of a man, preserves any of the feelings that belong to humanity.

Are these charges true or false? If they are true, then the sooner the execrable ruffians who can be guilty of such outrages, are dragged to light and doomed to suffer the penalties due to such an [anonymous] atrocities, the better for the well-being of our society and the character of our state. Smothering and cloaking over crimes that strike at the foundation of civilized society -- crimes that respect neither the life of man nor the sacred chastity of woman -- crimes that strike down and stab to the heart unarmed and unresisting innocence; and that, in the fury of unbridled passion, regard perhaps only with fiendish laughter, the woeful supplication, entreating cry and piteous shriek of maiden purity, assailed with a brutal and ferocious violence, that knows not how to spare -- covering up such crimes either from motivesa of policy or fear, equals in enormity the very crimes themselves.

It will appear evident to every reader in Missouri that the propagator of these foul charges against the citizen soldiers, has been either grossly imposed upon or has made statements which he knew to be untrue; we hope the former is the case. We were not at Far West upon the occasion referred to, and theregore cannot from our knowledge say any thing in reference to this subject, but so far as the testimony of others who were there is to be relied on, we consider ourselves warranted in saying that the whole statement of the Millersburg letter writer, so far as it regards the outrage charged to have been perpetrated by the soldiers upon the defenceless women, is utterly untrue, and we hope that those editors who have given publicity to the charges will see the propriety of contradicting them.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 12.                       Jefferson City,  February 9, 1839.                       No. 590.



HOUSE.

                      Monday, Feb. 4.

... The Bill from the Senate relative to the appointment of a committee to investigate the Mormon diffficulty, was laid on the table until the 4th of July, by vote of 47 to 38...

Mr, Atchison moved to reconsider the vote of the morning on the bill to appoint a committee to examine into the causes of the Mormon difficulties...


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 1.                             Boonville,  April 18, 1839.                            No. 51.



THE  MORMON  PRISONERS.

The Missouri Argus of the 12th, says, "A friend writing from Liberty, Mo., gives the following information:

"The Mormons are still in confinement -- Joe Smith and the rest of the leaders, with the exception of Sidney Rigdon. He was liberated on giving bail, and, as might have been expected, immediately took flight to Illinois. Whether the bird will return to its cage or not is uncertain, though in all probability we shall not see Sidney Rigdon on the west side of the Mississippi again. His companions in durance are treated with humanity and every kindness suitable to their condition. You may often see Joe himself in the streets, with a guard, taking the air. Now and then the dull routine of the town has been disturbed by rumors of attempts to escape. But I doubt whether any serious effort has been made. A week or two since, a physician residing here departed "post haste," and it was said that he had been concerned in supplying the Mormons with tools, arms, etc. A strict guard is kept, and I understand that the prisoners apartments are narrowly examined at intervals in order to prevent any tools or arms from being secreted. None are now admitted into the jail unless known to the jailer -- a very proper percaution. You may rest assured that the Mormons will receive justice from the people of upper Missouri."


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 2.                               Boonville,  May 2, 1839.                              No. 1.


 

It is reported that the Mormon prisoners have escaped.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 2.                              Boonville,  June 20, 1839.                              No. 8.


 

THE MORMONS. -- We learn from the St. Louis Gazette, that the Mormons, besides their purchase of land in the "half breed" tract in Iowa, have bought out the town of Commerce, on the Illinois shore, where they were to publish a paper. It is further stated that some of them had a difficulty lately with their neighbors in Iowa, and a Mormon was shot and his leg broken.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 13.                         Jefferson City,  July 13, 1839.                         No. 592.


 

PAYMENT OF THE MORMON TROOPS. -- The Paymaster General has been for some days on this duty; starting at St. Louis, where the money was furnished by the bank, and proceeding up the Missouri through the different counties where the volunteers were raised. We have been more particular in mentioning this fact, from an unjust and peevish insinuation by a writer in the Enquirer, that this money had been drawn and misapplied, when the real fact was, that it lay snug and safe in the vaults of the bank at St. Louis, awaiting the call of the proper authority. We cannot pass over this matter without relating the story of the crow. It was said on a certain time that a man had swallowed a crow, but upon investigation it was found that he was seen to have swallowed a small particle as black nearly as a crow!


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 2.                           Boonville,  July 18, 1839.                           No. 12.



MORMON  AND  OSAGE  TROOPS.

The Paymaster General has given notice that he will be at Boonville on the 19th, 20th and 22nd days of July, inst., for the purpose of paying the Troops. -- Capt. Childs' Company will be paid on the 19th, Capt. Turley's on the 20th, and Capt. Briscoe's on the 22nd.



THE MORMONS. -- The Columbia Patriot states that three of the Mormon prisoners confined in the jail of Boon county, escaped on the evening of the 4th inst. One of them however was retaken and brought back by the Deputy Sheriff.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. 2.                           Boonville,  July 31, 1839.                           No. 14.


 

MORMON WAR. -- The Missouri Sentinel, speaking of the Mormon war, calls it the late distinguished Mormon campaign.

Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. 1.                               Palmyra,  August 10, 1839.                               No. 2.


 

Gov. Boggs is about to demand of the Governors of Illinois, Iowa, or Wisconsin, the persons of the fugitive Mormons, Smith, Rigdon, Wright [sic] and others.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. 1.                               Palmyra,  August 24, 1839.                               No. 4.


 

MORMONS IN ILLINOIS. -- The Shelby Republican says that "some of the inhabitants of that county -- many of them said to be old residents -- embraced the Mormon faith. These, while pursuing their ordinary avocations, were beset by a mob, and assaults committed upon them. In order to enjoy the equal rights assured by the constitution, the Mormons made application to Judge Brease for warrants against fifteen of the leaders of the mob, and authorised and directed Col. James W. Vaughn to call out his regiment to assist in arresting them. The Colonel ordered out a part of his regiment, but some of his men refused to obey the order, and the mob increasing the military retreated."


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. 1.                               Palmyra,  September 28, 1839.                               No. 9.


 

The Mormons, says the N. Y. Gaz. are doing a thriving business, and strange and unaccountable as it may appear, are making comverts in a place where people profess to be rational beings. The Village Record published in Chester county, Pa. says fifteen were baptized into the faith on Monday of last week, at East Nanticul.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. 1.                               Palmyra,  October 5, 1839.                               No. 10.


 

A MORMON MEETING was held at the National Hall in New York on the evening of the 16th ult., when a Mr. Green, of the church, addressed the crowd, reciting the wrongs which the Mormons had received from the Missourians. The account of the proceedings in the Evening Post hold us up in no very enviable light. After Mr. Green concluded, several gentlemen addressed the meeting. A contribution of fifty dollars was raised instanter, and a committee appointed to solicit contributions throughout the city.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. 1.                               Palmyra,  October 12, 1839.                               No. 11.


 

==> King Follett, one of the Mormon prisobers, indicted for robbery, was tried at Columbia on the 25th ult. The jury, after retiring for a few minutes, brought in a verdict of not guilty.

Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. 1.                               Palmyra,  February 29, 1840.                               No. 31.


 

MORMONS IN CONGRESS. -- On the 28th, during the morning hour, a memorial was presented by Mr. Young of Illinois, from Joseph Smith and others, Mormons, asking the aid of Congress to redress their grievances, and compensate them for loses incurred as they state, while in Missouri. After a short discussion, the memorial was laid on the table for the present.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. 2.                               Palmyra,  September 19, 1840.                               No. 8.


 

We take the following from the Quincy Whig for the information of our readers, but beg leave at the same time to express our disapprobation of the tone and temper of the article, and of the manifest injustice done to our State and citizens: --

"THE  MORMONS."

We learn that the agent or officer despatched by Governor Carlin to the Governor of Missouri, for the purpose of demanding the authors of the outrages committed upon certain Mormon citizens of this State, at Tully, in July last, has returned, and that the demand was successful. The authors of the outrage will be given up, to be dealt with according to our laws.

Immediately upon the return of Gov. Carlin's messenger, two envoys made their appearance in our city, from Gov. Boggs of Missouri, commissioned with powers to demand of Gov. Carlin, Joseph Smith, jr. and Sydney Rigdon, two citizens of this State, -- as runaway criminals from Missouri.

Gov. Carlin and the two Missouri agents held a conference on Sunday last -- yes, on the Sabbath day! -- and the result was, as we learn, that Gov. Carlin is to give up Messrs. Smith and Rigdon, to the Missouri authorities.

So it appears the locofoco Governors of Missouri and Illinois, are carrying out a fine scheme between them. The Governor of Missouri is perfectly willing to give up the Tully rioters, to be tried by our laws, if in return, the Governor of Illinois, will surrender up two citizens of this State, to be sacrificed by a Missouri mob.

We greatly doubt the policy of this step on the part of Gov. Carlin. Most certainly, Smith and Rigdon should not be given up. The Governor well knows the prejudices existing in Missouri against the Society, of which they are prominent members. Should they be given up, and the Governor of Missouri should protect them from a mob, they could never expect justice in a trial under the laws of Missouri. The prejudices against their Society, originating in foul injustice and official persecution, so deeply affect the minds of the people of Upper Missouri, that a trial for crimes alledged against them, would be a mere mockery -- a farce. Their cases are all pre-judged. Even if tried and acquited, the mob would not leave them to go harmless from the State. Under this view of the circumstances, the Governor should have reflected more than two hours before he consented to give up Smith and Rigdon. If he gives them up, he gives them up as victims for a sacrifice, and their families will see them no more.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. 2.                               Palmyra,  September 26, 1840.                               No. 9.


 

THE MORMON AFFAIR. -- The St. Louis Bulletin says -- By a gentleman who arrived yesterday from the upper country, we are informed that an officer had arrived at Tully, from Jefferson City, to seize those who had been engaged in kidnapping the Mormons, but when he arrived he found them engaged at a game of quoits, on an island in the Mississippi, beyond his jurisdiction. He also informs us that the officers in Illinois had not succeeded in seizing Joe Smith and Sidney Rigdon.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 
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