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  • 05/20/2011 - 18:48
    Raghida Dergham, Dubai

    The countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) have grown increasingly self-confident, after working together and overcoming disagreements amongst them. Yet, they are also increasingly concerned by the storm of change that has suddenly come to the Arab World. They are aware of the fact that the oasis that is the Arab Gulf is in need of political, social and economic reform and that there is no escaping change.

  • 05/20/2011 - 15:35
    Walid Choucair

    When Palestinian young people broached the fence that divides Syria and the occupied Golan Heights last Sunday, one of them – Hussein Hijazi (among others) – reached the Golan. There, he took a bus with peace activists to Haifa, to see his family home. The story filled the pages of newspapers the next day, and the symbolism of the incident prompted many people, including Israelis, to think about the deep meaning behind it.

  • 05/20/2011 - 15:35
    Husam Itani

    The moment in which there is no longer any meaning to the calls made to the “master of the resistance” and its party in Lebanon to reconsider their positions vis-à-vis this or that event or phenomenon is coming fast. This is in parallel to a growing belief that Hezbollah has chosen to stand in the trench of those hostile toward the interests and aspirations of the Arab people.

  • 05/20/2011 - 15:35
    Jihad el-Khazen

    Will China become the world’s biggest superpower? My friend Mohammed Sid-Ahmed, Rest in Peace, was the first person who made me become interested in this question. When he returned from a trip to China in the mid-nineties, where he saw the size of Shanghai and the extent of its development to become a global financial capital, he wrote in Al-Ahram that the future belongs to China.

  • 05/20/2011 - 15:35
    Ghassan Charbel

    Two years ago, Barack Obama addressed himself from Cairo to Arabs and Muslims. He spoke of democracy and of encouraging it in the Middle East. The US President appeared to be dreaming that day, as our region has a long track record in resisting democracy and the winds of change. The president then was Hosni Mubarak, and he was obviously undecided between mandate renewal and bequeathal. It never occurred to him that he would have a different fate.

  • 05/19/2011 - 16:38
    Zuheir Kseibati

    What was witnessed in Kuwait’s parliament yesterday was not part of the winds of freedom and change seen in the spring of the Arabs, who have taken to the streets while armed with their throats in the face of the tanks of alarmed regimes. The scene was not one of Kuwaiti democracy or that of a change movement that would not fall in the trap of the bullets and that blockaded the Arab authority with all that is condemning to it.

  • 05/19/2011 - 16:38
    Jihad el-Khazen

    My friend Mona Eltahawy wrote a brilliant article entitled “Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter are the new tools of protest in the Arab world”. The genius in this article lies in the fact that it was published on 7/8/2010, in the Washington Post, or six months before the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak.

  • 05/19/2011 - 16:38
    Hassan Haidar

    US President Barack Obama’s success at killing Osama Bin Laden represents additional support for his decision to withdraw from Afghanistan, which is supposed to start next July, after having focused on exaggerating the differences between the Taliban movement and the Al-Qaeda organization.

  • 05/18/2011 - 17:57
    Abdullah Iskandar

    Let us assume for a moment that the accusations made against Director of the International Monetary Fund Dominique Strauss-Kahn in New York are true. And let us also assume that Strauss-Kahn did what he did but in France. Would we have seen him handcuffed and led by two policemen to a judge who refused to release him, even if on a million dollar bail?

  • 05/18/2011 - 17:57
    Jihad el-Khazen

    Muammar Gaddafi is like a sack of coal; whichever way you hold it, you end up with dirt on your hands.

    Yesterday, I talked about the files that had piled up in my office following the Arab revolutions of rage. Today, I shall continue with the file on Gaddafi, and I hope the reader will sacrifice with me and read it, because it reflects my personal selections from about two thousand pages that I had kept, and I found that cannot go back to more than five years in the past, for fear of getting lost in the Colonel’s labyrinth.