The Units  

DIVISION HEADQUARTERS

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
Div HQHeadquarters and Headquarters Battalion,
25th Infantry Division
(Tropic Lightning)
"Ready to Strike, Anytime, Anywhere"
1 October 1941Constituted as Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division and activated at Schofield Barracks on 1 October 1941 using assets of Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Hawaiian Division and Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 22nd Infantry Brigade, Hawaiian Division. In 1942 the division headquarters was merged with the division headquarters company when the headquarters company and the military police platoon were split into separate units. Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 25th Infantry Division received campaign participation credit for all twenty-six campaigns in which the 25th Infantry Division fought in WW II, Korea and Vietnam. Headquarters and Headquarters Company was awarded a Meritorious Unit Commendation for Vietnam 1969, a Philippine Presidential Unit Citation for participation in the liberation of Luzon, two awards of the Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, two awards of the Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm and the Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class. In the War on Terrorism, Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division served in Afghanistan from February 2004 to February 2005 providing the command element for the Combined/Joint Task Force 76, Operation Enduring Freedom V located at Bagram Air Base. The 25th Division Headquarters provided the leadership and planning that was instrumental in Coalition forces making OEF-V an effective fighting force. The Division's Headquarters Company was charged with the management of Task Force 76's Camp Viper consisting of over 800 Coalition personnel located at Bagram Air Base. Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 25th Infantry Division received campaign participation credit for the Consolidation I phase of the Afghanistan Campaign. As part of the modular conversion of the 25th Infantry Division the Headquarters and Headquarters Company was reorganized as Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division consisting of a mobile command group, a main command post and two tactical command posts. On 8 August 2006, Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division deployed to Iraq for a fifteen-month tour of duty, assuming command of Multinational Division-North (MND-N) located at Tikrit. Task Force Lightning, MND-N's operational arm, included the 25th Division's 3rd Brigade Combat Team and the Combat Aviation Brigade as well as three brigade combat teams from the 1st Cavalry, 2nd Infantry and 82nd Airborne Divisions as well as elements of the Marines, Air Force, Navy and National Guard. Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division returned to Schofield Barracks on 28 October 2007 having earned a Meritorious Unit Commendation and campaign participation credit for the Iraq National Resolution campaign. In November, 2008 Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division returned to Iraq for a twelve month tour of duty, again assuming command of MND-N with Task Force Lightning which included the 25th Division's 1st and 3rd Brigade Combat Teams and the 6th Squadron, 17th Cavalry. On 16 January 2010 the Division Headquarters was reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. The battalion consists of a Headquarters and Support Company, an Operations Company, an Intelligence and Sustainment Company and a Signal Company. For combat operations, elements of these companies will be tasked-organized as the Commanding General directs. The 25th Infantry Division Band is attached to the battalion. 25th Infantry Division Commanding Generals 1941 to Present.

BRIGADE COMBAT TEAMS

Note: Brigades have long been an important organization within the structure of the Army's divisions. However at the start of WWII they were eliminated from the Army divisions when the divisions were reorganized into a triangular configuration of three infantry regiments. In 1963 they were reinstituted when the Army's infantry divisions were reorganized from five infantry battle groups to a configuration of three infantry brigades of three infantry battalions each. In 2004 the Army decided to move from a division-centric to a brigade-centric force. Unlike previous division organizations wherein subordinate units were assigned to the division, under the brigade-centric concept subordinate units are assigned to the brigades. As a result the brigades have been transformed into combined-arms brigade combat teams. It should further be noted that brigades containing a special troops battalion have just a brigade headquarters with the former brigade headquarters company becoming the headquarters and headquarters company of the special troops battalion.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
HHQ, 1st BrigadeHeadquarters and Headquarters Company
1st Brigade Combat Team (Stryker),
25th Infantry Division
21 June 1963

Constituted and organized in 1917 as Headquarters, 167th Infantry Brigade, 84th Division. Converted and redesignated in 1942 as the 84th Reconnaissance Troop (less 3rd Platoon), 84th Division. The 84th Infantry Division entered combat in Holland in November 1944. In response to the German counterattack in the Ardennes the 84th was shifted to Belgium to help stop the German advance. Driving into Germany and meeting strong German resistance the 84th crossed the Roer and Rhine Rivers advancing to the Elbe River and linking up with Soviet forces on 2 May 1945. The 84th Reconnaissance Troop was inactivated in 1946 and reactivated in 1947 as the 84th Reconnaissance Platoon (later Company). 84th Reconnaissance Company disbanded in 1959. Concurrently reconstituted (less 3rd Platoon) in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 167th Infantry Brigade. Redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division and activated 26 August 1963 at Schofield Barracks. Arriving in Vietnam on 29 April 1966, the 1st Brigade was based initially at Cu Chi and participated in all twelve campaigns of the 25th Division receiving a Valorous Unit Award for Tay Ninh Province. The battalions serving with the 1st Brigade were the 4/9th Infantry, 2/14th Infantry (until Feb. 1970), 3/22nd Infantry (from Feb 1970) and 4/23rd Infantry (Mechanized). The 1st Brigade departed Vietnam on 8 December 1970. The 1st Brigade was stationed at Schofield Barracks from 1971 until reassigned to Fort Lewis Washington in 1995. In early 2002 the 1st Brigade began its conversion from a light infantry brigade to a Stryker brigade. It achieved combat-ready status in mid-2004 and began a one-year tour of duty in Iraq in September 2004. The 1st Brigade distinguished itself in the conduct of extensive combat operations against insurgent forces as well as in stability initiatives in and around the city of Mosul. For its conduct of combat operations in Iraq the 1st Brigade and its subordinate units received a Valorous Unit Award and campaign participation credit for the Iraqi Governance campaign. The brigade returned to Fort Lewis in September 2005. On 1 June 2006 the 1st Brigade Combat Team and its subordinate units were inactivated and their personnel and equipment transferred to the 2nd Cavalry Regiment (Stryker). On 16 December 2006 the 1st Brigade Combat Team (Stryker) was reactivated at Fort Wainwright, Alaska using the personnel and equipment of the inactivating 172nd Infantry Brigade (Stryker). In September 2008 the 1st Brigade Combat Team (Stryker) began a twelve-month tour of duty in Iraq. The 1st BCT, stationed in Diyala Province northeast of Baghdad, served in the Multi National Division-North's Task Force Lightning. The brigade successfully conducted combat operations in partnership with Iraqi security forces against insurgent elements as well as implementing numerous civil action projects aimed at improving the quality of life within the province. The 1st BCT earned participation credit for the Iraqi Surge and Iraqi Sovereignty campaign phases and returned to Fort Wainwright in September 2009. On 8 May 2011, the 1st BCT began its first deployment in Afghanistan assuming responsibility in Zabul province from the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment. Read more about them. For further details on Stryker brigades see our Division history section.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
HHQ, 2nd BrigadeHeadquarters and Headquarters Company
2nd Brigade Combat Team (Stryker),
25th Infantry Division
21 June 1963

Constituted and organized in 1917 as Headquarters, 168th Infantry Brigade, 84th Division. Converted and redesignated in 1942 as the 3rd Platoon, 84th Reconnaissance Troop, 84th Division. The 84th Infantry Division entered combat in Holland in November 1944. In response to the German counterattack in the Ardennes the 84th was shifted to Belgium to help stop the German advance. Driving into Germany and meeting strong German resistance the 84th crossed the Roer and Rhine Rivers advancing to the Elbe River and linking up with Soviet forces on 2 May 1945. The 84th Reconnaissance Troop was inactivated in 1946 and reactivated in 1947 as the 84th Reconnaissance Platoon (later Company). 84th Reconnaissance Company was disbanded in 1959. 3rd Platoon, 84th Reconnaissance Company concurrently reconstituted in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company 168th Infantry Brigade. Redesignated and activated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division 26 August 1963 at Schofield Barracks. Arriving in Vietnam on 20 January 1966, the 2nd Brigade was based initially at Cu Chi and participated in all twelve campaigns of the 25th Division receiving a Valorous Unit Award for Cu Chi District. The battalions serving with the 2nd Brigade were the 1/5th Infantry (Mechanized), 1/27th Infantry and 2/27th Infantry. Upon the departure of the 25th Infantry Division at color guard strength on 8 December 1970 for Schofield Barracks, the 2nd Brigade was placed under the control of II Field Force and operated out of Long Binh and Xuan Loc. It was composed of the 1/5th Infantry (Mechanized), 2/12th Infantry, 3/22nd Infantry, 1/27th Infantry and the 1/8th Artillery. The 2nd Brigade left Vietnam on 30 April 1971 at color guard strength for Schofield Barracks. The brigade was kept at zero strength until 5 June 1972 when it was brought to full strength. It consisted of the 1/14th Infantry 1/21st Infantry and 1/35th Infantry. In 1986 the 1/35th was replaced by the 4/22nd Infantry and then in 1995 the 4/22nd was replaced by the 1/27th Infantry. The 2nd Brigade served in Iraq from January 2004-February 2005 while attached to the 1st Infantry Division. Organized as a brigade combat team its five battalions, 1-14 Infantry, 1-21 Infantry, 1-27 Infantry, 2-11 Field Artillery and 225 Support Battalion, were organized into task forces and conducted security and stability operations primarily in and around the city of Kirkuk. The 2nd Brigade was awarded a Meritorious Unit Commendation and campaign participation credits for the Transition of Iraq and the Iraqi Governance campaigns. In late 2005 the 2nd Brigade began reorganizing from a light infantry brigade to a Stryker brigade combat team. By July 2007 the 2nd Brigade Combat Team had received its full complement of Stryker vehicles and departed for combat readiness training and certification in California. From December 2007 to March 2009 the 2nd Brigade Combat Team (Stryker) served a fifteen-month tour of duty in Iraq. It served with the Multi-National Division-Baghdad and was based at Camp Taji northwest of Baghdad. The brigade was responsible for the rural areas northwest and west of Baghdad successfully operating with Iraqi security forces in eliminating terrorist cells and locating and destroying numerous weapons caches, earning its second Meritorious Unit Commendation and credit for the Iraq National Resolution campaign. In July 2010 the 2nd Brigade Combat Team (Stryker) began a twelve month tour in Iraq. The 2nd BCT operated from Forward Operating Base War Horse in Baquba, the provincial capitol of Diyala Province, with the mission of advising and assisting Iraqi Security Forces and supporting reconstruction efforts within the province. The 2nd BCT will return to Schofield Barracks in June 2011.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
HHQ, 3rd BrigadeHeadquarters,
3rd Brigade Combat Team
(Infantry),
25th Infantry
Division
21 June 1963

Headquarters, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division was first constituted and organized in 1921 as Headquarters, 198th Infantry Brigade, 98th Division at Albany, NY. In 1942 it was reorganized and redesignated as the 98th Reconnaissance Troop (less 3rd Platoon) and ordered into Federal service. The 98th Infantry Division initially served from April 1944 to May 1945 as the defense force for the Hawaiian Islands. After V-J Day, the 98th Division was sent to Japan for occupation duty. Inactivated in1946, the 98th Reconnaissance Troop was reactivated in the Organized Reserves in 1947. It was redesignated as the 98th Reconnaissance Company and then disbanded 1 May 1959. Concurrently reconstituted (less 3rd Platoon) in the Regular Army as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 195th Infantry Brigade. It was redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade 25th Infantry Division on 21 June 1963. The 3rd Brigade was sent to Pleiku, Vietnam by a massive airlift named Operation Blue Light from 28 December 1965 to 17 January 1966. Under the operational control of I Field Force, the 3rd Brigade composed of the 1/14th Infantry, 1/35th Infantry, 2/35th Infantry, 2/9th Artillery, 1/69th Armor and Troop C, 3/4th Cavalry operated along the Cambodian border. In April 1967 the 3rd Brigade was attached to Task Force Oregon and engaged Viet Cong units in Quang Ngai Province receiving a Valorous Unit Award. On 1 August 1967 Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd Brigade less personnel and equipment rejoined the 25th Division. Its battalions remained in the central highlands and were reassigned to the 4th Division. Based at Dau Tieng, the 3rd Brigade, 25th Division assumed command of the former 3rd Brigade, 4th Division units, the 2/12th Infantry, 2/22nd Infantry (Mechanized) and 3/22nd Infantry. The 2/14th Infantry replaced 3/22nd Infantry in Feb. 1970. The 3rd Brigade received credit for twelve Vietnam campaigns. On 8 December 1970 it returned to Schofield Barracks less personnel and equipment and was inactivated on 24 July 1972. The 3rd Brigade was reactivated on 16 November 1985 at Schofield Barracks. The Brigade was composed of the 3rd Battalion, 22nd Infantry, the 4th Battalion, 27th Infantry and the 4th Battalion, 87th Infantry. On 16 August 1995 the three infantry battalions were replaced by the 2nd Battalion, 5th Infantry, the 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry and the 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry. The 3rd Brigade Combat Team served a one year tour of duty in Afghanistan from April 2004 -April 2005. The brigade was organized as Task Force (TF) Bronco. It included the 2-5 Infantry, 2-35 Infantry, 3-7 Field Artillery and the 3-4 Cavalry. All of these units were also organized as task forces. TF Bronco was based at Kandahar Airfield and was responsible for security and stability operations for the Regional Command South. On 16 November 2005 the 3rd Brigade Combat team was reorganized under the modular concept. The following units are assigned to the 3rd Brigade: 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 3rd Battalion, 7th Field Artillery, Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade, and the 325th Support Battalion. In August 2006 the brigade began a tour of duty in northern Iraq. The 3rd Brigade Combat Team was based at Forward Operating Base Warrior in the northern Iraq city of Kirkuk. The 3rd Brigade Combat Team completed a fifteen month tour of duty in October 2007, earning a Meritorious Unit Commendation and receiving campaign participation credit for the Iraq National Governance campaign. The 3rd Brigade Combat Team returned to Iraq in October 2008 for a twelve month tour of duty. The 3rd BCT was stationed in Salah ad Din Province in northern Iraq. The 3rd BCT successfully accomplished its missions of partnering with the Iraqi Forces in increasing province security as well as its mission to improve the quality of life in the province. Particular success was achieved in expanding schools, improving access to water and electricity and increasing business opportunities. The 3rd Brigade Combat Team earned participation credit for the Iraqi Surge and Iraqi Sovereignty campaign phases and returned to Schofield Barracks in October 2009. The 3d BCT returned to Afghanistan after an absence of six years in April 2011 and on 3 May 2011 as part of Regional Command- East, assumed responsibility for security and stability operations for Nangarhar, Kunar and Nuristan provinces located along the border with Pakistan.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
HHQ, 4th BrigadeHeadquarters,
4th Brigade Combat Team
(Airborne),
25th Infantry
Division
6 December 1969

Constituted in the Regular Army and activated 6 December 1969 at Schofield Barracks. The mission of the 4th Brigade, 25th Infantry Division was to serve as a strategic reserve for contingencies in the Pacific area other than Vietnam. The 4th Brigade was composed of the 2nd Battalion, 5th Infantry, the 3rd Battalion, 14th Infantry, the 3rd Battalion, 27th Infantry, the 5th Battalion, 13th Artillery, Troop H, 10th Cavalry, the 76th Engineer Company and the 425th Support Battalion. Upon the return of the 25th Infantry Division to Schofield Barracks, the 4th Brigade was inactivated on 15 December 1970. On 16 July 2005 Headquarters, 4th Brigade was reactivated as Headquarters, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division and activated at Fort Richardson, Alaska. The brigade is composed of the 1st Battalion, 501st Infantry, 3rd Battalion, 509th Infantry, 1st Squadron, 40th Cavalry, 2nd Battalion, 377th Field Artillery, Special Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade and the 725th Support Battalion. All of the units are on Airborne (parachute) status. The 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne) served a fifteen month tour of duty in Iraq beginning in October 2006. Based at FOB Kalsu the brigade primarily served in Babil, Karbala and Najaf provinces with battalions also serving in Anbar Province and in Baghdad. The brigade returned to Fort Richardson in December 2007. The 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne) deployed to eastern Afghanistan for a twelve month tour of duty beginning in February 2009. The 4th BCT conducted security, stability and reconstruction missions along the Pakistan border in the provinces of Paktika, Paktiya and Khost with the two infantry battalions operating in Paktika, the cavalry squadron in Paktiya and the field artillery battalion in Khost. The 4th BCT earned participation credit for the Afghanistan Consolidation II campaign phase and returned to Fort Richardson in February 2010. Read more about them.

INFANTRY

Note: Twenty-two infantry regiments or elements thereof have been assigned to the 25th Infantry Division since the division's activation on 1 October 1941. Beginning in 1957 infantry regiments were converted from tactical regiments to parent regiments of tactical infantry battle groups (now battalions) and separate companies under the Combat Arms Regimental System (CARS). For an explanation of the CARS system and its successor, the U.S. Army Regimental System, see our Regimental System page.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
The Wolfhounds27th Infantry Regiment
(The Wolfhounds)
"Nec Aspera Terrent"
("No Fear on Earth")
1 October 1941

The 27th Infantry was constituted and organized in February 1901. The Regiment saw its first action during the Philippine Insurrection on the island of Mindanao. In WW I the Regiment served with the American Expeditionary Force in Siberia where it gained its famous name of "The Wolfhounds". In 1921 the 27th Infantry was assigned to the Hawaiian Division at Schofield Barracks and then to the 25th Division upon its activation on 1 October 1941. The Wolfhounds participated in the first American action of WW II when the Japanese attacked Hawaii on 7 December 1941. The 27th Infantry went on to distinguish itself in campaigns with the 25th on Guadalcanal, the Northern Solomon Islands and then in fierce fighting on the island of Luzon. From 1945-1950 the Wolfhounds served on occupation duty in Japan. In response to the invasion of South Korea, the 27th Infantry, serving as the Eighth Army's fire brigade, was instrumental in preserving the Pusan Perimeter. The 27th participated in all ten campaigns with the 25th Division, earning three Presidential Unit Citations for gallantry. In Vietnam the 1st and 2nd Battalions served with the 2nd Brigade and participated in all twelve campaigns of the 25th receiving three Valorous Unit Awards while the 3rd Battalion served in the 4th Brigade, 25th Division in Hawaii from 1968-70. Post-Vietnam the 2nd and 3rd Battalions served with the 7th Infantry Division from 1986-93 and participated in the Panama expedition. The 4th Battalion, 27th Infantry served with the 3rd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division from 1987 to 1995. In Desert Storm the 4th Battalion was tasked to furnish three platoons to the Third U.S. Army as replacements for casualties. After arrival in Saudi Arabia in January 1991 their mission was changed to that of providing security for the Third Army forward command post as it moved into Kuwait. Then on 1 March 1991 one platoon served as the escort and security for General Schwarzkopf at the truce signing in Iraq. The 1st Battalion served in Iraq from January 2004 to February 2005 with the 2nd Brigade Combat Team as a battalion task force conducting security and stability operations in the vicinity of the city of Kirkuk. The 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry received a Valorous Unit Award for its conduct in combat actions against insurgent forces. The 1st Battalion also earned participation credit for the Transition of Iraq and Iraqi Governance campaign phases. Reorganized as a Stryker mounted infantry battalion in 2004-2005, the 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry served in Iraq for fifteen months with the 2nd Brigade Combat Team (Stryker) from December 2007-March 2009 headquartered at Camp Taji. For extraordinary heroism in combat actions against Iraqi insurgents the battalion received a Valorous Unit Award for the period 14 January 2008-22 February 2009. The 1st Battalion also earned participation credit for the National Resolution, Iraqi Surge and Iraqi Sovereignty campaign phases. The 1st Battalion returned to northern Iraq with the 1st BCT in July 2010 to train and assist Iraqi forces. The 2nd Battalion served in Afghanistan from April 2004 to April 2005. The 2nd Battalion conducted security and stability operations in eastern Paktika Province near the Pakistan border under the operational control of the 25th Division's Task Force Thunder. For its service in Afghanistan the 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry was awarded a Meritorious Unit Commendation. The 2nd Battalion, 27th Infantry served for fifteen months in Iraq with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team from August 2006 to October 2007 conducting intensive counter insurgency operations in the vicinity of the city of Hawijah in northern Iraq. For its exceptional effectiveness in accomplishing its mission the 2nd Battalion received a Meritorious Unit Commendation and participation credit for the National Resolution and Iraqi Surge campaign phases. From October 2008 to October 2009 the 2nd Battalion served again in Iraq with the 3rd BCT conducting stability operations and facilitating the rebuilding of critical economic infrastructure in the Bayji city area. For its accomplishments the 2nd Battalion received a Meritorious Unit Commendation and participation credit for the Iraqi Sovereignty campaign phase. The 27th Infantry is the only infantry regiment to have served continuously with the 25th Infantry Division since 1 October 1941. Read more about them.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
The Cacti35th Infantry Regiment
(The Cacti)
"Take Arms"
1 October 1941

The 35th Infantry Regiment was constituted and organized in July 1916 at Douglas, Arizona. The regiment saw its first action against Mexican forces at Nogales, Arizona in 1918. In 1921 the 35th Infantry was assigned to the Hawaiian Division and then to the 25th Division on 1 October 1941. The 35th Infantry participated in the first American action of WW II when the Japanese attacked Hawaii on 7 December 1941. On Guadalcanal the 35th earned a Presidential Unit Citation for its capture of Mount Austin against fierce Japanese resistance. In the Northern Solomon's campaign "The Cacti" made an amphibious assault on Vella LaVella Island. On Luzon the 35th engaged Japanese forces in close combat in the mountains of Northern Luzon. The 35th Infantry was one of the first regiments to respond to the invasion of South Korea in June 1950. "The Cacti" fought in all ten campaigns with the 25th Division receiving a Presidential Unit Citation for its heroic stand at the Nam River. The 35th Infantry Regiment was considered one of the best regiments in the Eighth Army. In Vietnam the 1st and 2nd Battalions served with the 3rd Brigades of the 25th and 4th Infantry Divisions with both battalions receiving a Valorous Unit Award. In 1972 the 2nd Battalion was inactivated and in 1987 the 1st Battalion was inactivated. The 2nd Battalion was reactivated on 16 August 1995. The 2nd Battalion served in Afghanistan from April 2004 to April 2005 with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team. As a battalion task force it conducted combat operations and reconstruction efforts in Zabol Province in southern Afghanistan. The battalion earned participation credit for the Consolidation I phase of the Afghanistan Campaign. From September 2006 to October 2007 the 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry served a fifteen month tour of duty with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team in Kirkuk, Iraq conducting counter insurgency and stability operations. For its effectiveness in executing its missions the 2nd Battalion received a Meritorious Unit Commendation and participation credit for the National Resolution and Iraqi Surge campaign phases. In October 2008, the 2nd Battalion returned to Iraq with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team for a twelve month tour. The battalion operated in the Samarra area, conducting stability operations and facilitating the rebuilding of the city's economic infrastructure. For its accomplishments the 2nd Battalion received a Meritorious Unit Commendation and participation credit for the Iraqi Sovereignty campaign phase. The 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry returned to Schofield Barracks in October 2009. Read more about them.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
298th Infantry298th Infantry Regiment
Maukaukau Kakou
(We Are Prepared.)
1 October 1941

The 298th Infantry was organized as the 1st Regiment, National Guard of Hawaii from 1893-95 at Honolulu. It was redesignated as the 1st Hawaiian Infantry Regiment and mobilized into Federal service during WW I at Fort Shafter, Hawaii from 1918-19. In 1923 it was redesignated as the 298th Infantry Regiment. Called to Federal service on 15 Oct 40, the 298th Infantry was assigned to the 25th Division on 1 October 1941. On 7 December 1941 the 298th Infantry came under fire and took casualties during the Japanese attack on Hawaii. On 23 July 1942 the 298th was reassigned to the 24th Infantry Division. On 12 June 1943 the 298th Infantry was relieved from assignment to the 24th Division and was designated as a separate infantry regiment. It was assigned to the US Army Central Pacific and participated in the Central Pacific, Western Pacific, Leyte and Ryukyus campaigns. The regiment was released from Federal service on 10 April 1945 in Hawaii. On 8 January 1957 the 298th Infantry was reorganized and redesignated as the 298th Antiaircraft Artillery Group. It was further redesignated as the 298th Artillery Group (Air Defense) on 15 November 1961. On 22 January 1972 the 298th was reorganized and redesignated as the 298th Field Depot with station at Wahiawa, Hawaii. On 1 June 1976 the 298th Field Depot was inactivated with its Headquarters and Headquarters Company being consolidated with Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Hawaii Army National Guard. On 16 August 1997 a new 298th Regiment not related by lineage to the original 298th Infantry Regiment, was constituted as a Regional Training Institute for the Hawaii Army National Guard at Waimanalo, Hawaii.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
161st Infantry161st Infantry Regiment
(First Washington)
"First In War - First In Peace"
3 August 1942

The 161st Infantry was first organized in 1886. As the 1st Regiment, Washington Volunteer Infantry, it saw action on the island of Luzon during the Philippine Insurrection in 1899. In 1916 the 161st Infantry guarded the Mexican Border against raids by Pancho Villa. In 1917 the regiment received its current designation as the 161st Infantry Regiment and in WW I served in France with the 41st Division as a replacement unit. The 161st Infantry was called to Federal service with the 41st Division in 1940. On 3 August 1942 the 161st was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division. The 161st saw action on Guadalcanal driving the last Japanese forces from the island. It then participated in fierce fighting on New Georgia Island in the Northern Solomons Campaign. After the American landing on Luzon in January 1945 the 161st saw heavy action in fighting Japanese forces on the central Luzon plain. At the town of San Manuel the Japanese made a strong defensive stand supported by over forty tanks. After four days of intense close-combat the 161st liberated the town. For their gallantry in the battle for San Manuel, both Company E and Cannon Company, 161st Infantry were awarded Presidential Unit Citations. The 161st Infantry was inactivated in Nagoya, Japan on 1 November 1945. In 1946 the regiment was assigned back to the 41st Infantry Division. In 1959 the 1st and 2nd Battle Groups, 161st Infantry were activated. In 1963 the battle groups were reorganized as battalions with the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Battalions, 161st Infantry assigned to the 81st Infantry Brigade (Mech) NGUS. In August 2000 the brigade was reorganized and redesignated as the 81st Armor Brigade. The 1st Battalion, 161st Infantry Regiment served a tour of duty in Iraq from April 2004-2005. The battalion remained assigned to the 81st Brigade Combat Team but was attached to the 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. It defended the International (Green) Zone in Baghdad as well as conducting security operations in southeast Baghdad. Read more about them.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
4th Infantry4th Infantry Regiment
(Warriors)
1 November 1945

Constituted and organized in 1812 as the 14th Infantry. The regiment saw action during the War of 1812 in Canada and Maryland. The regiment was consolidated with four other infantry regiments in 1815 to form the 4th Infantry. During the Mexican War the 4th participated in 12 campaigns. In the Civil War the 4th Infantry as part of the Army of the Potomac saw action in 12 campaigns including Gettysburg and Appomattox. The 4th Infantry then participated in the Indian Wars, the War with Spain and the Philippine Insurrection. In World War I the 4th Infantry, assigned to the 3rd Division, saw extensive combat in France. For gallantry during the battle of the Marne the 4th received two awards of the French Croix de Guerre with Gold Star. During WW II the 4th served in Alaska participating in the recapture of Attu Island from the Japanese in May 1943. On 1 November 1945 the 4th Infantry less personnel and equipment was assigned to the 25th Division where it replaced the 161st Infantry. The 4th performed occupation duties in Osaka Japan until 1 February 1947 when it was replaced by the 24th Infantry. The 4th then saw service with the 71st and 3rd Infantry Divisions. The 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry is currently assigned to the Seventh Army Training Command's Combat Maneuver Training Center at Hohenfels, Germany where it serves as the opposing force. The 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry was reactivated 19 January 2005 at Fort Polk, Louisiana and assigned to the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division. Read more about them.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
24th Infantry24th Infantry Regiment
(Deuce Four)
"Semper Paratus"
("Always Prepared")
1 February 1947

The 24th Infantry was constituted as the 38th Infantry on 28 July 1866 with African- American enlisted personnel. In 1869 it was consolidated with the 41st Infantry also composed of African-American enlisted personnel and redesignated as the 24th Infantry Regiment. In the Indian Wars the 24th Infantry saw action against the Comanches and other Indian tribes in western Texas. In the War with Spain the 24th gained fame for its gallant charge up San Juan Hill. The 24th Infantry saw action during two campaigns of the Philippine Insurrection in 1899 and 1900. In WW II as a separate infantry regiment the 24th served in the Solomon Islands in 1943 participating in combat on Bougainville. In December 1944 the 24th Infantry was sent to the islands of Saipan and Tinian to eliminate pockets of Japanese resistance. On 1 February 1947 the 24th Infantry was assigned to the 25th Division in Osaka Japan. In response to the invasion of South Korea, the 24th Infantry landed in Korea on 13 July 1950. On 20 July, the 24th Infantry Regiment undertook the first offensive operation of the 25th Division when it attacked and recaptured the vital road junction of Yechon. It was considered to be the first sizable American ground victory of the Korean War. The 24th Infantry went on to see extensive combat in six Korean campaigns. As part of the integration of the Army the 24th Infantry was inactivated on 1 October 1951. The 24th Infantry Regiment was designated a parent regiment under the US Army Regimental System on 16 August 1995 and its 1st Battalion was activated and assigned to the 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division at Fort Lewis, Washington. Beginning in October 2004 the battalion distinguished itself in intensive combat operations and stability initiatives in and around the city of Mosul, Iraq with the 1st Brigade. For its conduct of combat operations in Iraq the 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry received a Valorous Unit Award. The 1st Battalion returned to Fort Lewis in September 2005. On 1 June 2006 the 1st Brigade Combat Team including the 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry was inactivated; with personnel and equipment transferred to the 2nd Cavalry Regiment (Stryker). The 1st Brigade Combat Team including the 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry was reactivated on 16 December 2006 with station at Fort Wainwright, Alaska. In September 2008 the 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry, 1st Brigade Combat Team (Stryker) began a twelve-month tour of duty in Iraq. The 1st Battalion, stationed in Diyala Province northeast of Baghdad, served in the Multi National Division-North's Task Force Lightning. The battalion successfully conducted combat operations in partnership with Iraqi security forces against insurgent elements as well as implementing numerous civil action projects aimed at improving the quality of life within the province. In recognition of its accomplishments the 1st Battalion was awarded a Meritorious Unit Commendation and also earned participation credit for the Iraqi Surge and Iraqi Sovereignty campaign phases. The battalion returned to Fort Wainwright in September 2009. Read more about the 1st Battalion.
Read more about them.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
Golden Dragons14th Infantry Regiment
(Golden Dragons)
"The Right of the Line"
1 August 1951

Constituted and organized in May 1861 as the 2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry. Redesignated as the 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry in 1862. The battalion participated in twelve campaigns with the Army of the Potomac's V Corps to include Antietam and Gettysburg. In 1866 it was reorganized and redesignated as the 14th Infantry Regiment. In the Indian Wars the 14th served in Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and Arizona. In the War with Spain the 14th participated in the seizure of Manila and then fought Filipino rebels during the Philippine Insurrection. In 1900 the 14th was sent to China to help put down the Boxer Rebellion. The 14th climbed the walls of the Forbidden City under Chinese fire acquiring the name of "Golden Dragons". In WW II the 14th was assigned to the 71st Division and from March to May 1945 saw action in southern Germany and Austria. The 14th served on occupation duty until inactivated in 1946. It was reactivated in 1948 as a separate regiment specializing in mountain warfare at Camp Carson, Colorado. Assigned to 25th Infantry Division on 1 August 1951 in Korea the Golden Dragons participated in five campaigns of the Korean War. In Vietnam the 1st Battalion served with the 3rd Brigades of the 25th and 4th Infantry Divisions from 1966-70 receiving a Navy Presidential Unit Citation. The 2nd Battalion served in the 1st and 3rd Brigades, 25th Division from 1966-70. The 3rd Battalion served with the 4th Brigade, 25th Division at Schofield Barracks from 1969-70. Post-Vietnam, the 2nd Battalion was reassigned to the 10th Mountain Division in 1986. Since then it has participated in combat actions in Somalia, Afghanistan and Iraq. The 5th Battalion served with the 25th Division from 1986-1995. The 1st Battalion which had been reassigned to the Tropic Lightning in 1970 participated in Operation Iraqi Freedom with the 2nd Brigade from January 2004 to February 2005. The battalion, operating as a task force, participated in security and stability operations in and around the cities of Kirkuk and Samarra as well as in other areas of central and northern Iraq. For its gallantry in defeating insurgent forces in the city of Samarra, the 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry received a Valorous Unit Award. The battalion was reorganized as a Stryker-mounted infantry battalion in 2006-2007. The 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry served in Iraq for fifteen months with the 2nd Brigade Combat Team (Stryker) from December 2007-March 2009 headquartered at Camp Taji. For extraordinary heroism in combat actions against Iraqi insurgents the battalion received a Valorous Unit Award for the period 14 January 2008-22 February 2009. The 1st Battalion also earned participation credit for the National Resolution, Iraqi Surge and Iraqi Sovereignty campaign phases. The 1st Battalion returned to northern Iraq with the 2nd BCT in July 2010 to train and assist Iraqi forces. Read more about them.

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Rock of Chickamauga19th Infantry Regiment
(The Rock of Chickamauga)
1 February 1957

The 19th Infantry was constituted and organized in the Regular Army May-July 1861 at Indianapolis, Indiana. In the Civil War the 19th saw action in the western theater of operations in Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee and Georgia participating in nine campaigns. Its most famous action was the Battle of Chickamauga in Georgia 19-20 September 1863 where it earned its name as the Rock of Chickamauga for its heroic defense against attacking Confederate forces. The 19th Infantry went on to see action in the Indian Wars, the War with Spain and the Philippine Insurrection. During WW I the 19th served in the 18th Division along the Mexican Border. In 1922 the regiment was assigned to the Hawaiian Division which was redesignated the 24th Infantry Division on 1 October 1941. Beginning with the Japanese attack on Hawaii 7 December 41, the 19th Infantry participated in five Pacific campaigns. It made a total of four amphibious assault landings in New Guinea and the Philippines receiving two Presidential Unit Citations. The 19th served on occupation duty in Japan from 1945-1950. Responding to the invasion of South Korea the 19th as part of the 24th Division saw intense action in eight campaigns of the Korean War and received a Presidential Unit Citation. On 1 Feb 1957 the 2nd Battle Group, 19th Infantry was assigned to the 25th Division. It was inactive from 25 Mar 1958 until 1 Mar 1961 as a cost savings measure. Reactivated on 1 Mar 1961 it was reassigned to the 24th Infantry Division on 26 Jan 1962. The 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry was assigned to the 25th Division from 5 June 1972 to 16 July 1986. Currently the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 19th Infantry are stationed at Fort Benning Georgia conducting basic training.

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Gimlet21st Infantry Regiment
(Gimlet)
"Duty"
1 February 1957

Constituted and organized in May 1861 as the 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry at Fort Hamilton, New York and participated in twelve campaigns of the Civil War to include Antietam and Gettysburg. In 1866 the 2nd Battalion 12th Infantry was reorganized and redesignated as the 21st Infantry Regiment. During the Indian Wars the regiment participated in eight campaigns in California, Idaho and Arizona. In the War with Spain, the 21st Infantry saw action in Cuba at San Juan Hill and then in the Philippine Insurrection. In 1921 the 21st Infantry was assigned to the Hawaiian Division which was redesignated the 24th Infantry Division on 1 October 1941. The regiment saw its first combat in WW II during the Japanese attack on 7 December 1941. The Gimlets went on to participate in four campaigns on New Guinea and in the Philippines, including two amphibious assaults. In 1945 the 21st undertook occupation duty in Japan. When South Korea was invaded in June 1950, the 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry was the first unit deployed against the North Korean invaders. The 21st participated in eight campaigns and saw some of the fiercest fighting of the Korean War receiving two Presidential Unit Citations. From 1 February 1957 to 1 February 1963, the 2nd Battle Group, 21st Infantry served with the 25th Division at Schofield Barracks. The 3rd Battalion 21st Infantry was activated on 15 September 1965 at Fort Devens MA and assigned to the 196th Light Infantry Brigade. The 196th, including the 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry was attached to the 25th Infantry Division upon the brigade's arrival in Vietnam on 26 August 1966. The 3rd Battalion participated in some of the largest operations of the Vietnam War while attached to the 25th including Operations Attleboro. Cedar Falls and Junction City. In April 1967 the 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry with the 196th was transferred to Chu Lai in Military Region I. In the six years of service in Vietnam the 3rd Battalion participated in fourteen campaigns receiving a Valorous Unit Award and a Navy Unit Commendation. It was the last U.S. Army infantry battalion to leave Viet Nam. The 3rd Battalion was reactivated at Schofield Barracks on 16 January 1986, assigned to the 25th Infantry Division and served in the 1st Brigade until it was inactivated on 15 July 1995. The 3rd Battalion was again assigned to the 25th Infantry Division on 16 March 2002 and rejoined the 1st Brigade then stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington as a Stryker infantry battalion. Beginning in October, 2004 the 3rd Battalion served in and around the city of Mosul, Iraq, distinguishing itself in combat and stability operations with the 1st Brigade. For its conduct of combat operations in Iraq the 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry received a Valorous Unit Award. The 3rd Battalion returned to Fort Lewis in September 2005. The 1st Battalion was assigned to the 25th Division on 5 June 1972. The 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry served in Iraq from January 2004-February 2005 with the Tropic Lightning's 2nd Brigade which was attached to the 1st Infantry Division. The 1st Battalion, organized as Task Force 1-21, conducted multi-faceted combat and civil affairs operations in the northern Iraq city of Kirkuk. On 1 June 2006 the 1st Brigade Combat Team (Stryker) including the 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry was inactivated; with personnel and equipment transferred to the 2nd Cavalry Regiment (Stryker). The 1st Brigade Combat Team including the 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry was reactivated on 16 December 2006 with station at Fort Wainwright, Alaska. In July 2007 the 2nd Brigade including the 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry completed reorganizing as a Stryker Brigade Combat Team. From November 2007 to February 2009 the 1st Battalion conducted counter-insurgency operations northwest of Baghdad earning participation credit for the National Resolution, Iraqi Surge and Iraqi Sovereignty campaign phases. From September 2008 to September 2009 the 3rd Battalion served in Iraq's Diyala Province as part of Task Force Lightning, conducting combat operations against insurgent elements and training Iraqi forces earning a Meritorious Unit Commendation and participation credit for the Iraqi Surge and Iraqi Sovereignty campaign phases. The 1st Battalion returned to northern Iraq with the 2nd BCT in July 2010 for a twelve month tour to advise and assist Iraqi forces.
Read more about the Regiment. Read more about the 1st Battalion. Read more about the 3rd Battalion.

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The Rock503rd Infantry Regiment
(The Rock Regiment)
"The Rock"
24 June 1960

Constituted and activated in March 1942 at Fort Benning Georgia as the 503rd Parachute Infantry Regiment. In WW II served as a separate regiment in the Pacific Theater participating in four campaign in New Guinea and the Philippines. The regiment's most famous action and from which comes its name and motto, occurred on 16 February 1945 with a parachute assault on the island fortress of Corregidor for which it received a Presidential Unit Citation. The 503rd was inactivated in 1945. In 1951 it was reactivated as the 503rd Airborne Infantry Regiment and assigned to the 11th Airborne Division. The 2nd Airborne Battle Group, 503rd Infantry was activated and assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division in 1957. It was reassigned to the 25th Infantry Division on 24 June 1960 and stationed on Okinawa. On 1 July 1961 it was relieved from assignment to the 25th Division. In 1963 it was assigned to the 173rd Airborne Brigade and redesignated as the 2nd Battalion (Airborne), 503rd Infantry. In Vietnam the 2nd Battalion participated in thirteen campaigns to include a parachute assault and received three Presidential Unit Citations. From 1972-83 it served in the 101st Airborne Division as an air assault battalion then was inactivated. From 1986-1990 it served as an air assault battalion with the 2nd Infantry Division in Korea and again was inactivated. The 2nd Battalion (Airborne) 503rd Infantry Regiment was reactivated on 16 December 2001 as a parachute infantry battalion and assigned to the 173rd Airborne Brigade stationed at Vicenza, Italy. As part of the 173rd Airborne Brigade, the 2-503rd participated in Operation Iraqi Freedom from March 2003-2004. The battalion served in Afghanistan from April 2005 to March 2006 in Zabol Province and returned to Afghanistan for a second tour of duty from June 2007-August 2008.

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Bobcats5th Infantry Regiment
(Bobcats)
"I'll Try, Sir"
1 February 1963

Constituted as the 4th Infantry in May-June 1808. The regiment's first campaign was against Indian tribes in the mid-west culminating at the battle of Tippicanoe. In the War of 1812 the regiment fought three campaigns against the British in Canada and New York. From May-October 1815 the regiment was consolidated with five others to form the 5th Infantry. During the Mexican War the 5th Infantry participated in six campaigns. In the Civil War the 5th served in New Mexico. The 5th Infantry fought in nine campaigns of the Indian Wars achieving distinction in winter campaigning. In WW II the 5th Infantry assigned to the 71st Division, saw action from March to May 1945 in Germany and Austria. Inactivated in 1946 in Austria the 5th was reactivated in 1949 in Korea as a separate regimental combat team and then reassigned to Schofield Barracks. The 5th quickly returned to Korea in response to the North Korean invasion. Briefly attached to the 25th Division, the 5th was attached to the 24th Division for the majority of the war. The 5th participated in all ten Korean campaigns, with the 3rd Battalion receiving a Presidential Unit Citation. From 1954-57 the regiment was assigned to the 71st and 8th Infantry Divisions. In 1959 the 1st Battle Group, 5th Infantry was assigned to the 1st Infantry Division. It was reassigned to the 25th Division on 1 February 1963 and reorganized and redesignated as the 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry on 12 August 1963. In Vietnam the 1st Battalion served as a mechanized infantry battalion, participating in all twelve campaigns of the 25th Infantry Division. The battalion was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation for heroism during the period 18 August through 20 September 1968 in and around the Ben Cui rubber plantation, Binh Doung Province. The battalion also received a Valorous Unit Award for operations in Cu Chi District with the 2nd Brigade during the period January through April 1966. The 2nd Battalion, 5th Infantry served at Schofield Barracks with the 25th Infantry Division's 4th Brigade and then the 1st Brigade from 6 December 1969 to 5 June 1972. From 1987-1995 the 1st Battalion (Mech) was assigned to the 2nd Infantry Division in Korea. On 16 August 1995 the 1st Battalion was assigned to the 1st Brigade, 25th Division at Fort Lewis. In 2002 the 1st Battalion was reorganized as a Stryker infantry battalion. Beginning in October 2004, the 1st Battalion served in and around the city of Mosul, distinguishing itself in combat and stability operations with the 1st Brigade. For its conduct of combat operations in Iraq the 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry received a Valorous Unit Award. The 1st Battalion returned to Fort Lewis in September 2005. The 2nd Battalion was reactivated on 16 August 1995 and assigned to the 3rd Brigade. The 2nd Battalion served a one year tour of duty in Afghanistan from May 2004 to May 2005 as part of the 25th Division's Task Force Bronco. As Task Force 2-5 Infantry it was initially responsible for security and stability operations in Ghazni Province. In June 2004 TF 2-5 Infantry moved to Uruzgan Province and successfully halted anti-coalition militia's attempts to disrupt voting in the October national elections. For its service in Afghanistan, the 2nd Battalion, 5th Infantry was awarded a Meritorious Unit Commendation. As part of the modular conversion of the 25th Infantry Division the 2nd Battalion was inactivated on 16 November 2005 after serving for a second time with the Tropic Lightning for nine years. On 1 June 2006 the 1st Brigade Combat Team including the 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry was inactivated; with personnel and equipment transferred to the 2nd Cavalry Regiment (Stryker). On 16 December 2006, using the assets of the inactivating 172nd Infantry Brigade (Stryker), the 1st Brigade Combat Team (Stryker) including the 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry was reactivated at Fort Wainwright, Alaska. In September 2008 the 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry 1st Brigade Combat Team (Stryker) began a twelve-month tour of duty in Iraq. The 1st Battalion, stationed in Diyala Province northeast of Baghdad, served in the Multi National Division-North's Task Force Lightning. The battalion successfully conducted combat operations in partnership with Iraqi security forces against insurgent elements as well as implementing numerous civil action projects aimed at improving the quality of life within the province. In recognition of its accomplishments, the 1st Battalion was awarded a Meritorious Unit Commendation and also earned participation credit for the Iraqi Surge an Iraqi Sovereignty campaign phases. The battalion returned to Fort Wainwright in September 2009. The 2nd Battalion, 5th Infantry was reactivated on 16 August 2009 at Fort Bliss, Texas. It was assigned to the 3rd Brigade Combat Team (Infantry), 1st Armored Division. Read more about the Bobcats through our 5th Infantry Chapter, and read about the 1st Battalion.

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The Manchu9th Infantry Regiment
(Manchu)
"Keep Up the Fire"
14 January 1966

The 9th Infantry was constituted and organized in March 1855. During the Civil War the 9th fought in eight campaigns in the western theater. In the Indian Wars, the 9th campaigned against the Sioux. In the War with Spain the 9th participated in the charge up San Juan Hill. In 1899 it was sent to help quell the Philippine Insurrection. In July 1900 the 9th was dispatched to China to help put down the Boxer Rebellion. At the battle of Tientsin, the 9th Infantry's mortally wounded commander urged his men to "Keep up the Fire". The 9th Infantry went on to assault Peking's Forbidden City earning the name "Manchus". In WW I the 9th Infantry assigned to the 2nd Division participated in heavy fighting in six campaigns receiving three French Croix de Guerre with Palm. In WW II the 9th Infantry saw heavy fighting in Normandy and Brittany culminating in the capture of the city of Brest. During the Battle of the Bulge the 9th halted the Germans in their sector and then drove into Germany reaching Czechoslovakia by V-E Day and receiving three Presidential Unit Citations. In Korea, the 9th saw fierce fighting through all ten campaigns receiving two Presidential Unit Citations. In 1963, the 4th Battle Group, 9th Infantry was activated in Alaska. Redesignated the 4th Battalion it was reassigned to the 25th Division 14 January 1966. In Vietnam, the 4th Battalion participated in all twelve campaigns of the 25th with Company C receiving a Presidential Unit Citation. Inactivated in 1972, the 4th Battalion was reactivated in Alaska in 1983 and then reassigned to the 7th Division at Fort Ord from 1983-87. Returning to Alaska, the battalion was assigned to the 6th Division. On 15 December 1995 the 4th Battalion 9th Infantry was inactivated. The 4th Battalion (Stryker), 9th Infantry Regiment was reactivated on 1 June 2006 at Fort Lewis Washington and assigned to the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Stryker), 2nd Infantry Division. The 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry is currently serving a tour of duty in Iraq. Read more about them.

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Tomahawks23rd Infantry Regiment
(Tomahawks)
"We Serve"
14 January 1966

Constituted and organized as the 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry in 1861. In 1862 redesignated as the 2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry. Fought with the Army of the Potomac in the Civil War participating in 12 campaigns including Gettysburg. Reorganized and redesignated as the 23rd Infantry in 1866. In the Indian wars, the 23rd served in Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Arizona and Colorado. During the War with Spain it participated in the seizure of Manila. The 23rd Infantry remained in the Philippines fighting against the Filipino insurrectionists in five campaigns. In WW I the 23rd Infantry, assigned to the 2nd Division, fought in six campaigns receiving three French Croix de Guerre with Palm. In WW II the 23rd Infantry participated in heavy fighting in Normandy and Brittany culminating in the seizure of the city of Brest. Stopping the German Ardennes offensive in their sector, the 23rd resumed the offensive through Germany reaching Czechoslovakia by V-E Day receiving four Presidential Unit Citations. Responding to the invasion of South Korea in June 1950 the 23rd Infantry achieved fame at the battle of Chipyong-Ni in February 1951 when the surrounded regiment held off heavy Chinese assaults for three days. The 23rd participated in all ten Korean campaigns receiving three Presidential Unit Citations. The 4th Battle Group 23rd Infantry was activated in Alaska in 1963. Redesignated as the 4th Battalion it was reassigned to the 25th Division on 14 January 1966. In Vietnam the 4th Battalion was mechanized and participated in all twelve campaigns of the 25th Division receiving two Valorous Unit Awards. Reassigned to Alaska from 1972-1983 the 4th Battalion was then assigned to the 9th Infantry Division at Fort Lewis, Washington until inactivated on 28 September 1990. The 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry was reactivated on 16 March 2004 at Fort Richardson, Alaska. The battalion was organized as a Stryker infantry battalion and assigned to the 172nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team at Fort Richardson Alaska. The battalion served a sixteen-month tour of duty in Iraq from August 2005 to December 2006. For its gallantry in Iraq the 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry received a Valorous Unit Award. On 15 December 2006 the 4th Battalion was inactivated and relieved from assignment to the 172nd Infantry Brigade. On 16 April 2007 the 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment was reactivated as a Stryker infantry battalion at Fort Lewis Washington and assigned to the 5th Brigade Combat Team (Stryker), 2nd Infantry Division. Read more about them.

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None authorized38th, 40th, 44th and 46th Infantry Platoons
(Scout Dog)
66th Infantry Platoon (Combat Tracker)
16 July 1966

Four Infantry Platoons (Scout Dog) or IPSD served with the 25th Division during the period 16 July 1966 to 15 March 1971. An IPSD consisted of one officer, and 27 enlisted personnel of which approximately 20 were dog handlers of mostly German Shepherd dogs. The mission of an IPSD was to support tactical operations by detecting enemy forces through the unique capabilities of the scout dog. Most often the scout dog and his handler would serve as the point of a unit on the move. The scout dogs, signaling the presence of the enemy in time for the unit to react, saved countless lives. But serving as the point was dangerous work and both the handlers and the dogs were sometimes casualties. Scout dogs also proved their value in night ambush operations giving the unit early warning of an approaching enemy. Read more about them.
The 38th IPSD was first organized as the 38th Quartermaster War Dog Platoon in 1944 and saw service in Northern Italy during WW II. Reactivated in 1953 the 38th saw service during the Korean War until inactivated in 1954. It was reactivated on 28 March 1966 at Fort Benning. It joined the 25th Division on 16 July 1966. The 38th was based at Cu Chi in support of the 2nd Brigade. It moved with the 2nd Brigade to Long Binh and Xuan Loc in November 1970 and remained with the 2nd Brigade until the platoon's inactivation in Vietnam on 15 March 1971. The 38th IPSD was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation for the period 18 August to 20 September 1968 and credit for participation in twelve Vietnam campaigns.
The 40th IPSD was first organized as the 40th Quartermaster War Dog Platoon in May 1944 and saw service in the Philippines and the Ryukyus Islands. Reactivated in 1953 the 40th saw action during the Korean War until inactivated in 1954. On 12 May 1966 the 40th Infantry Platoon (Scout Dog) was activated at Fort Benning. The 40th joined the 3rd Brigade, 25th Division on 26 Aug 1966 serving with it in the Central Highlands and Quang Ngai Province until reassigned to the 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division on 1 August 1967. The 40th IPSD was inactivated in Vietnam on 1 October 1970 after participating in eleven Vietnam campaigns.
The 44th IPSD was first organized as the 44th Quartermaster War Dog Platoon in 1944 and served in the western Pacific during WW II and inactivated at Camp Anza, CA in 1946. It was active from 1954-57 stationed at Fort Carson and Fort Benning. Reactivated on 2 September 1966 at Fort Benning the 44th arrived in Vietnam on 11 January 1967 and joined the 3rd Brigade 4th Infantry Division at Dau Tieng. It was assigned to 25th Infantry Division 1 August 1967 with the other former units of the 3rd Brigade, 4th Division. The 44th IPSD supported the 3rd Brigade 25th Division until the brigade's departure from Vietnam. The 44th was inactivated in Vietnam on 10 December 1970. The 44th IPSD (-) was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation for the period 18 August to 20 September 1968 and credit for participation in eleven Vietnam campaigns. A member of the 44th IPSD, Staff Sergeant Robert W. Hartsock was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry on 23 February 1969 at Dau Tieng.
Th 46th IPSD was activated in 1967 and arrived in Vietnam on 24 September 1967. It initially served with the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment at Xuan Loc and received a Valorous Unit Award for extraordinary heroism during the 1968 Tet Offensive. The 46th IPSD was then reassigned to the 25th Division and remained with the 25th until inactivated in Vietnam on 10 December 1970. The 46th IPSD participated in ten Vietnam Campaigns.
The 66th Infantry Platoon (Combat Tracker)
A combat tracker team generally consisted of a team leader, a dog handler with a Labrador Retriever, a visual tracker, and a cover man/RTO all cross-trained. A combat tracker team worked well in advance of a moving unit in order to maintain surprise with a mission of locating enemy forces and/or to perform reconnaissance of enemy activities. Locating missing friendly personnel was another type of mission. The IPCT was the unclassified successor to the Combat Tracker Teams that operated prior to February 1968. The 66th Infantry Platoon (Combat Tracker) was activated on 15 February 1968 and served with the 25th Infantry Division until inactivated in Vietnam on 15 March 1971 with the departure of the 2nd Brigade. The 66th IPCT received campaign participation credit for nine Vietnam campaigns. Read more about them.

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White Warriors12th Infantry Regiment
"Ducti Amore Patriae"
(Having Been Led by Love of Country)
1 August 1967

Constituted and organized as the 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry in 1861. In the Civil War participated in twelve campaigns of the Army of the Potomac including Antietam and Gettysburg. Reorganized and redesignated as the 12th Infantry Regiment in 1866 it participated in three campaigns in the Indian Wars in the northwest from 1872-1891. In the War with Spain the 12th Infantry saw action in Cuba participating in the capture of the Spanish fortress of El Caney. The regiment then was ordered to the Philippines to help put down the Philippine Insurrection. In WW II the 12th Infantry was assigned to the 4th Infantry Division. On D-Day 6 June 1944 the 12th landed on Utah Beach. In heavy fighting through the Normandy hedgerows the 12th Infantry led the assault on the port city of Cherbourg which fell on 25 June 1944. During the Battle of the Bulge the 12th Infantry was instrumental in stopping the German advance into Luxembourg receiving a Presidential Unit Citation and the Belgian Fourragere. The 12th resumed the offensive into Germany crossing the Rhine and capturing the city of Rothenberg as the war ended. In 1957 the 2nd Battle Group 12th Infantry was activated in Germany. Initially assigned to the 8th Infantry Division and then to the 1st Infantry Division in 1959, the 2nd Battle Group,12th Infantry reinforced the Berlin Brigade during the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962. Redesignated the 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry in 1963 it was assigned to the 4th Infantry Division. In Vietnam the 2nd Battalion was reassigned to the 25th Infantry Division on 1 August 1967 and participated in eleven campaigns receiving a Presidential Unit Citation. The 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry was inactivated on 17 April 1971 at Fort Lewis, Washington. Assigned back to the 4th Infantry Division the battalion was active at Fort Carson Colorado from April-September 1976. and June 1989-September 1995. On 29 September 2005 the 2nd Battalion,12th Infantry was activated as an element of the 2nd Infantry Division and on 16 November 2005 it was assigned to the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division at Fort Carson. The 2nd Battalion,12th Infantry served a tour of duty in Iraq with the 2nd Brigade Combat Team from October 2006-January 2008. Upon returning to Fort Carson the 2nd Battalion was reassigned to the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. Read more about them.

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The Regulars22nd Infantry Regiment
"Deeds Not Words"
"Regulars, By God" (Unofficial)
1 August 1967

Constituted 3 May 1861 as the 2nd Battalion, 13th Infantry. Organized in Ohio in 1865. Reorganized and redesignated as the 22nd Infantry in 1866. During the War with Spain the 22nd Infantry was the first American unit to land in Cuba where it participated in the capture of the Spanish fortress of El Caney and the siege of the city of Santiago. The 22nd was then ordered to the Philippines where it fought Filipino insurgents in five campaigns. In WW II the 22nd Infantry assigned to the 4th Division landed on Utah Beach on D-Day. In heavy fighting through hedgerows the 22nd helped clear the Contentin Peninsula and seize the port of Cherbourg receiving two Presidential Unit Citations. In Luxembourg, during the Battle of the Bulge, the 22nd Infantry stopped the German advance in their sector receiving a Presidential Unit Citation and the Belgian Fourragere. Resuming the offensive into Germany the 22nd Infantry reached the Isar River by V-E Day. In Vietnam the 2nd Battalion (Mechanized) and the 3rd Battalion 22nd Infantry deployed to Vietnam with the 3rd Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. On 1 August 1967 they were reassigned to the 25th Infantry Division. The 2nd and 3rd Battalions participated in eleven campaigns both receiving a Presidential Unit Citation for the battle of Soui-Tre. The 3rd Battalion later received a Valorous Unit Award. Inactivated in 1972, the 2nd Battalion was active from 1976-84 with the 4th Division. It was reactivated in 1986 and assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum New York. The 3rd and 4th Battalions, 22nd Infantry were assigned to the 25th Division in 1986 and inactivated in 1995. Read more about them.

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Play the Game50th Infantry Regiment
"Play the Game"
20 December 1967

Constituted and organized 15 May 1917. Ordered to Germany for occupation duty in 1919. Inactivated in Germany 1921 and regiment disbanded in 1922. Reconstituted as the 50th Armored Infantry Regiment and assigned to the 6th Armored Division in 1942. In 1943 regiment was broken up with the 2nd Battalion redesignated as the 9th Armored Infantry Battalion (AIB). The 9th AIB landed in France as part of the 6th Armored Division in July 1944 and participated in five campaigns through France and Germany receiving the French Croix de Guerre with Palm for gallantry. Inactivated in 1945, the 9th AIB was activated as a training battalion at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri from 1950-1956. In 1957 the 9th along with the 44th and 50th AIBs were consolidated to reform the 50th Infantry Regiment. On 20 December 1967 Company F (Long Range Patrol), 50th Infantry Regiment was activated and assigned to the 25th Infantry Division in Vietnam using the personnel from the provisional LRRP detachement operating with the 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry. Company F (LRP) participated in five Vietnam campaigns. For heroic actions in Bing Doung Province Company F (LRP) received a Valorous Unit Award. On 1 February 1969 Company F (LRP) was inactivated. Company F was reactivated in Vietnam on 30 June 1971 as a rifle security company assigned to the Army Support Command in Danang. It was inactivated on 16 November 1972. The battle honors earned by Company F (LRP) in Vietnam are displayed on the Regimental Color of the 50th Infantry Regiment. The 1st Battalion, 50th Infantry Regiment is stationed at Fort Benning, Georgia conducting infantry training. Read more about them.

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Recon75th Infantry (Ranger) Regiment
"Sua Sponte"
("Of Their Own Accord")
1 February 1969

Organized on 3 October 1943 at Deogarh, India and activated 1 January 1944 as the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional) (Merrill's Marauders) under the U.S. Army Forces in China-Burma-India. Designed as a long-range penetration force, the unit operated behind Japanese lines in Burma receiving a Presidential Unit Citation for the capture of the airfield and town of Myitkyina. On 3 August 1944, at Ledo, India the 5307th was consolidated with the 475th Infantry Regiment (Long Range Penetration, Special). The 475th was assigned to the MARS Task Force with the mission of opening a supply route to China. The 475th Infantry participated in heavy combat with Japanese forces as the task force fought its way through northern Burma arriving in China in April 1945 where the 475th was inactivated on 1 July 1945. Redesignated as the 75th Infantry it was active from 1954 -1956 on Okinawa. On 1 January 1969 the 75th Infantry (Ranger) was organized and activated as the parent regiment for separate long-range patrol companies. On 1 February 1969 Company F (Ranger) was activated and assigned to the 25th Infantry Division using the personnel and equipment of Company F, 50th Infantry. Company F (Ranger) participated in six campaigns of the Vietnam War receiving a Valorous Unit Award for heroic actions in Bing Doung Province. It was inactivated on 15 March 1971 in Vietnam. On 2 October 1984 Company F was redesignated as Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion (Ranger) 75th Infantry and activated at Fort Benning Georgia. It was consolidated with Company A, 3rd Ranger Infantry Battalion (inactive) on 3 February 1986 and the 3rd Battalion 75th Infantry was redesignated as the 3rd Ranger Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment. The battle honors earned by Company F (Ranger) in Vietnam are carried on the 3rd Ranger Battalion's Color. Read more about Co. F (Ranger), and about the 75th Ranger Regiment.

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87th Inf.87th Infantry Regiment
"Vires Montesque Vincimus"
("We Conquer Power and Mountains")
16 June 1986

Constituted 15 November 1941 at Fort Lewis, Washington as the 87th Infantry Mountain Regiment. Redesignated as 87th Mountain Infantry in 1942. Participated in the Aleutian Islands campaign in August 1943. Assigned to the 10th Light Division (Pack, Alpine) on 22 February 1944; redesignated 10th Mountain Division 6 November 1944. Entered combat in the Italian North Apennine Mountains on 19 February 1945. In a surprise bayonet attack the 87th Mountain Infantry participated in the seizure of heavily defended Mount Belvedere and then successfully defended it against seven German counter-attacks. This cracked the German defensive line and opened the Po Valley to Allied Forces. From 20-27 April 1945 against fierce German resistance and sustaining heavy casualties, the 87th fought across the Po Valley reaching the foothills of the Alps at Lake Garda. The 87th Mountain Infantry was inactivated on 21 November 1945. In 1948 the 87th was reactivated as a training regiment and then reorganized as a line regiment in 1954. Company D was inactivated in 1957. It was reactivated on 1 June 1966, sent to Vietnam as a separate rifle security company and assigned to the 95th Military Police Battalion at Long Binh. Inactivated on 8 November 1969, Company D was reactivated in Vietnam on 30 June 1971 as a separate rifle security company at Tan My and assigned to the 26th General Support Group. Company D was inactivated on 30 April 1972. On 16 June 1986 Company D was reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 87th Infantry and assigned to the 25th Division. The 4th Battalion, 87th Infantry served with the 25th Division for nine years until inactivated on 15 July 1995. Currently the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 87th Infantry are assigned to the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, NY.

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Sykes' Regulars20th Infantry Regiment
(Sykes' Regulars)
"Tant Que Je Puis"
("To the Limit of Our Ability")
16 August 1995

Constituted 3 May 1861 as the 2nd Battalion, 11th Infantry. In the Civil War, the battalion served in the Army of the Potomac participating in twelve campaigns with the 2nd Division, V Corps known as "Sykes' Regulars". In 1866 it was reorganized and redesignated as the 20th Infantry Regiment. In the Indian Wars, the 20th campaigned in Montana and the Dakotas. In the War with Spain the 20th Infantry participated in the capture of the Spanish fortress of El Caney and the siege of the city of Santiago, Cuba. During the Philippine Insurrection the 20th served in two campaigns. The 20th Infantry was assigned to the 6th Division in 1939. The regiment's initial action in WW II occurred at Maffin Bay, New Guinea in June 1944 with the 3rd Battalion receiving a Presidential Unit Citation. On 9 January 1945 the 20th made an amphibious assault at Lingayen Gulf on Luzon. The 20th overcame stiff Japanese resistance in the Cabaruan Hills and at the town of Munoz with the 2nd and 3rd Battalions receiving Presidential Unit Citations. After V-J Day the 6th Division was sent to Korea for occupation duty. Inactivated in 1949, the 6th was reactivated in 1950 at Fort Ord as a training division. In 1956 the 20th was reassigned to the Canal Zone where Company E was inactivated in 1957. From 1960-66 Company E served as a separate company in Korea. On 25 September 1967 Company E (LRP) was activated in Vietnam serving with the I Field Force and the 4th Infantry Division. Inactivated on 1 February 1969, it was reactivated on 30 June 1971 in Vietnam as a rifle security company at Long Binh then inactivated on 16 August 1972. Company E was redesignated as Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry on 16 August 1986 and assigned to the 2nd Infantry Division in Korea. On 16 August 1995 the 5th Battalion was reassigned to the 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division at Fort Lewis. Effective 16 September 2000, the 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry was reassigned to the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington. The 5th Battalion served a one year tour of duty in Iraq from October 2003-October 2004 with the 3rd Brigade (Stryker), 2nd Infantry Division which operated in and around the city of Mosul. It is currently serving a second tour of duty in Iraq with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team (Stryker), 2nd Infantry Division.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
Sykes' Regulars52nd Infantry Regiment
(Ready Rifles)
"Fortis et Certus"
("Brave and True")
16 July 2002

Company B and Company D, 52nd Infantry Regiment were constituted 15 May 1917 in the Regular Army, organized 16 June 1917 at Chickamauga Park, Georgia and assigned to the 6th Division on 16 November 1917. The 52nd Infantry arrived in France as part of the 6th Division in July 1918 and participated in the Alsace and Meuse - Argonne campaigns and was inactivated at Camp Grant, Illinois on 1 September 1921. On 15 July 1942 the regiment was redesignated the 52nd Armored Infantry Regiment. It was assigned to the 9th Armored Division and activated at Fort Riley, Kansas. The regiment was broken up on 9 October 1943 with Company B redesignated as the Company B, 60th Armored Infantry Battalion (AIB) and Company D redesignated as Company A, 27th AIB. The 9th Armored Division entered combat in Luxembourg in October 1944. During the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944 the 60th AIB received a Presidential Unit Citation (PUC) for gallantry against the attacking German forces at Echternach, Luxembourg and the 27th AIB received a PUC for gallantry at St. Vith, Belgium. The 9th Armored Division entered Germany on 2 March 1945 and by 7 March Combat Command B (CCB) reached the west bank of the Rhine River at Remagen finding the Germans about to destroy the Ludendorff railroad bridge the last bridge spanning the Rhine. Given the order to seize the bridge Company A, 27th AIB charged across supported by the 14th Tank Battalion as the Germans set off explosive charges attempting to bring down the bridge. Company A successfully cleared the bridge of Germans and established a bridgehead on the east bank of the Rhine followed by the rest of the 27th AIB and CCB. The seizure of the bridge was credited for saving thousands of Allied casualties and shortening the war. For its gallantry at Remagen the 27th AIB received its second PUC. The 60th and 27th AIBs were credited with participation in three European campaigns. Both battalions were inactivated on 13 October 1945 at Fort Patrick Henry, Virginia. On 14 September 1950, the 52nd Infantry was reformed, reactivated and assigned to the 71st Infantry Division. On 25 February 1953, the 52nd was inactivated, reassigned to the 9th Armored Division (inactive) and broken up into four inactive AIBs. In 1957, the 52nd Infantry was designated a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System with Company B reorganized and activated as the 2nd Battalion, 52nd Infantry in 1957 and assigned to the 3rd Armored Division in Germany. Inactive from 1963 to 1967, it then served with the 1st Armored Division at Fort Hood and in Germany until again inactivated in 1972. Company D, 52nd Infantry was reactivated on 1 June 1966 as a separate rifle security company. It served in Vietnam from 26 November 1966- 22 November 1969 attached to the 95th Military Police Battalion at Long Binh. It was reactivated as a separate rifle security company attached to the U.S. Army Support Command, Qui Nhon from 30 June 1971 to 26 November 1972. Company D participated in thirteen Vietnam campaigns and was awarded two Meritorious Unit Commendations. 16 July 2002 Company D, 52nd Infantry was assigned to the 1st Brigade Combat Team (Stryker), 25th Infantry Division and activated at Fort Lewis. The company served a one year tour of duty in Iraq with the 1st Brigade from Oct 2004-2005. On 16 November 2005 Company B, 52nd Infantry was assigned to the 2nd Brigade Combat Team (Stryker), 25th Infantry Division and activated at Schofield Barracks. On 1 June 2006 the 1st Brigade Combat Team including Company D, 52nd Infantry was inactivated; with personnel and equipment transferred to the 2nd Cavalry Regiment (Stryker). The 1st Brigade Combat Team including Company D, 52nd Infantry was reactivated on 16 December 2006 with station at Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Both companies are organized as anti-tank companies equipped with TOW missiles.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
501st Infantry Regiment501st Infantry Regiment
"Geronimo"
16 July 2005

The current 1st Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry Regiment was activated on 1 October 1940 as Company A, 501st Parachute Battalion at Fort Benning Georgia. On 24 February 1942 the 501st Parachute Battalion was redesignated as the 1st Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment. The battalion was shipped to Australia where it was inactivated. The 1st Battalion was reactivated at Camp Taccoa, Georgia on 15 November 1942 as part of the newly formed 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment. The 501st arrived in England 31 January 44 and was attached to the 101st Airborne Division. The 501st jumped into Normandy on D-Day, 6 June 1944 capturing the Douve River canal locks at La Barquette. The regiment also participated in Operation Market Garden with the 101st making a parachute assault on Vechel, Holland on 17 September 1944 seizing the town and its four bridges over the Aa River. And on 17 December 1944, it was the initial regiment of the 101st to arrive in defense of Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge. For its gallantry at Normandy and Bastogne the 501st received two Presidential Unit Citations plus numerous decorations from France, Netherlands and Belgium. The 501st was disbanded 20 August 45 in Germany. Reconstituted as the 501st Parachute Infantry Battalion and activated 1 August 1946 at Fort Benning the battalion was inactivated on 23 November 1948. The 501st was reorganized and redesignated as the 501st Airborne Infantry Regiment and activated on 10 May 1951 at Camp Breckinridge, Kentucky as a training regiment. The regiment was inactivated on 1 December 1953. On 27 April 1954 the 501st was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division and served as a training regiment at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. On 16 March 1956 the 101st was transferred less personnel and equipment to Fort Campbell, Ky and organized as an airborne division. On 25 April 1957 the 501st became a parent regiment in the Combat Arms Regimental System. Company A was reorganized and redesignated Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Airborne Battle Group, 501st Infantry and assigned to the 101st Airborne Division. (Organic elements concurrently constituted and activated.) On 3 February 1964 it was redesignated as the 1st Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry. On 1 April 1966 the battalion was reflagged as the 4th Battalion (Airborne) 503rd Infantry which was sent to Vietnam for service with the 173rd Airborne Brigade. The 1st Battalion, 501st was brought back to full strength as an airmobile infantry battalion and arrived in Vietnam as part of the 101st's 2nd Brigade on 16 December 1967. Initially co-located with the 25th Infantry Division at Cu Chi, the 1/501st with the rest of the 2nd Brigade (including the 2/501st) moved north to Military Region 1 in February 1968. The battalion served with the 2nd Brigade at Hue, Phu Bai, and Van Xa for the remainder of its tour of duty in Vietnam receiving campaign participation credit for 12 Vietnam campaigns, three awards of the Republic of Vietnam's Cross of Gallantry with Palm and the Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal 1st Class. The battalion left Vietnam on 4 February 1972 for Fort Campbell. On 5 June 1984 the 1st Battalion was inactivated. On 16 October 1989 the 1st Battalion was reactivated as a parachute infantry battalion and assigned to the 6th Infantry Division with station at Fort Richardson, Alaska On 16 April 1998 the 1st Battalion was reassigned to the 172nd Infantry Brigade. From November 2003 to July 2004 the Geronimos served in Afghanistan conducting security and stability operations around the city of Khost. On 16 July 2005 the 1st Battalion (Airborne) 501st Infantry Regiment was reassigned to the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division with duty station at Fort Richardson, Alaska. The battalion served a fifteen-month tour of duty in Iraq from October 2006-December 2007 with the 4th Brigade Combat Team. Company B, 1st Battalion received a Valorous Unit Award for the period June-November 2007 for extraordinary heroism in contributing to the defeat of insurgent activity in Babil Province, Iraq as part of Task Force 3 Geronimo. From February 2009 to February 2010 the 1st Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry served a twelve month tour of duty with the 4th Brigade Combat Team in Paktika Province in eastern Afghanistan. The battalion received a Valorous Unit Award for its gallantry in defeating insurgent forces during the period 28 March 2009 through 20 February 2010 as well as earning participation credit for the Afghanistan Consolidation II campaign phase. Read more about the 1st Battalion.

Distinctive
Unit Insignia
Unit Designation
Motto
First Assigned to Unit History
509th Infantry Regiment509th Infantry Regiment
"All The Way"
16 September 2005

The 3rd Battalion (Airborne), 509th Infantry Regiment was first activated as Company C, 504th Parachute Infantry Battalion on 5 October 1941 at Fort Benning Georgia. The company was reorganized and redesignated as Company F, 2nd Battalion, 503rd Parachute Infantry Regiment on 24 February 1942. On 2 November 1942 the battalion was redesignated as the 2nd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment. (The remainder of the 509th Regiment was never activated.) The 509th was the only U.S. Army infantry regiment/battalion to make five combat assault landings during WWII. The first occurred on 9 November 1942 during the seizure of French Algeria by American and British forces. After a 1600 mile non-stop flight from England the battalion aided in the capture of the airfield at Tafarquay with a parachute assault. On 15 November the battalion made its second parachute assault to secure the airfield at Youk-Les-Bains near the Tunisian border. The third assault landing occurred near Salerno, Italy with a parachute assault behind German lines at Avellino on 14 September 1943. On 10 December 1943 the battalion was redesignated as the 509th Parachute Infantry Battalion and Company F was redesignated as Company C. The fourth assault landing occurred when the 509th was a lead element in the Allied amphibious landing at Anzio, Italy on 21 January 1944. For its gallantry it stopping a German counterattack on the Anzio beachhead on 29 February 1944 the battalion was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation (PUC). Company C was later awarded a PUC for its gallantry in a night attack on 14 March 1944 in the same area. The fifth assault landing occurred on 14 August 1944 when the 509th made a parachute assault on Le Muy in southern France for which it received the French Croix de Guerre with Silver Star. Moving north to Belgium the 509th saw heavy fighting in the Battle of the Bulge stopping two German mechanized battalions near Liege for which it received its second PUC. This was followed by heavy fighting near St Vith that forced the German forces into full retreat but left only some fifty-odd officers and men present-for-duty in the 509th. Subsequently the 509th Parachute Infantry Battalion was disbanded on 1 March 1945 in France. The 509th received credit for eight WWII campaigns in addition to its five combat assault landings. The 509th was reconstituted in the Regular Army in 1947. In 1963 it was redesignated as the 509th Infantry a parent regiment under the Army's Combat Arms Regimental System. From 1 April 1963-1 September 1973 the 1st and 2nd Battalions were assigned to the 8th Infantry Division at Mainz Germany with duel missions as airborne and mechanized infantry battalions. On 15 January 1973 Company C, 509th Infantry was reorganized, redesignated and activated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company (HHC), 3rd Battalion (Airborne), 509th Infantry (organic battalion elements concurrently constituted) using assets of the 1st and 2nd Battalions. The 3rd Battalion was transferred from Mainz to Vicenza, Italy. On 1 September, 1973 the 3rd Battalion was reflagged as the 1st Battalion at Vicenza. Also on that date the 2nd Battalion was inactivated at Mainz.. The 1st Battalion was inactivated on 1 July 1983. On 1 July 1975 HHC, 3rd Battalion was redesignated as Company C, (Airborne) 509th Infantry and activated at Fort Rucker, Alabama where it served as an airborne pathfinder company in support of the Aviation School until its inactivation on 31 May 1993. On 18 December 1987 the 1st Battalion was reactivated at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas and served as the Opposing Force at the Joint Readiness Training Center, Fort Chafee until inactivation on 31 May 1993. The 1st Battalion was reactivated on 15 January 1994 at Fort Polk as an airborne infantry battalion where it serves as the Opposing Force for the Joint Readiness Training Center. From June 2004-2005 two of its line companies served in Iraq. On 16 September 2005 Company C , 509th Infantry was once again reorganized and redesignated as HHC, 3rd Battalion (Airborne), 509th Infantry Regiment (organic elements concurrently constituted), assigned to the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne) 25th Infantry Division and activated at Fort Richardson, Alaska. The battalion served a fifteen-month tour of duty in Iraq from October 2006 to December 2007 primarily in Anbar Province. The 3rd Battalion operating as Task Force 3 Geronimo received a Valorous Unit Award for the period June-November 2007 for extraordinary heroism in defeating the insurgent activity in Babil Province, Iraq. From February 2009 to February 2010, the 3rd Battalion (Airborne), 509th Infantry served a twelve month tour of duty with the 4th Brigade Combat Team in Paktika Province in eastern Afghanistan. For the period 1 July 2009 to 30 November 2009 the battalion received a Valorous Unit Award for inflicting heavy casualties on Taliban insurgents in eastern Paktika Province while ensuring security of the population during the national elections. The 3rd Battalion also earned participation credit for the Afghanistan Consolidation II campaign phase. Read more about them.


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