Mega Man & Bass

An old Mega Man adventure for the Super NES gets its first stateside release on the GBA�and this old timer�s got a lesson for the new kids.

Even though this GBA release of Mega Man & Bass represents the first American incarnation of the Japanese SNES game Roman & Forte, it wasn�t quality that kept the game away from these shores. This older entry in the series is actually better than any of the other Mega Man GBA titles.

The game has a fairly polished presentation. The 16-bitty 2D graphics in Mega Man & Bass hold up well, but slowdown is apparent when several enemies are on the screen. The sound effects and music haven�t really changed all that much since Mega Man was born (would you have it any other way?), but aside from a few rather overly happy and out-of-place melodies, the music is pretty rockin�.

The game�s longevity is enhanced by the addition of a second playable character; Bass�s moves don�t differ too drastically from Mega Man�s, but using him allows access to a surprising number of new paths and different collectible CDs (virtual trading cards of Mega Man characters) for the completist.

But the real reason Mega Man & Bass works is simple: It represents Mega Man doing what he does best�beating bosses with cool themes, collecting their weapons, and overcoming well-designed levels that are difficult�but not stupidly-super-frustratingly difficult. The game isn�t diluted by the weird chip-swapping power-ups introduced in the Battle Network series, or the weapon-element upgrade system from Mega Man Zero�these methods simply can�t hold a candle to the old-fashioned rock-paper-scissors-fireball-dinosaur-broccoli way of doing things. Dumb traditions need to die; good ones (like this) should be kept alive.

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sammykewlguy

No one seemed to mention that this game is a little hard. It helps to know the order to play the bosses in.

Now when will we see the SNES version on the Wii?

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