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The History of Cricket: 1741 – 1745 | The History of Cricket: 1751 – 1760 | Index


The History of Cricket: 1746 – 1750

1746 | 1747 | 1748 | 1749 | 1750
The Bartholomews | John & Thomas Bell | Thomas Brandon | Durling | Robert Eures | John Frame | Thomas Jure | John Larkin | John Mansfield

1746

the history

The '45 Rebellion was effectively over by the time cricket got under way in 1746. The Battle of Culloden was fought on Wednesday, 16 April. The Jacobites had invaded England as far as Derby during the winter before retreating to Scotland because they believed they were outnumbered by advancing Hanoverian forces. At Culloden, about 9000 government troops faced some 5400 Jacobites. The Jacobites staged their usual "Highland Charge" but they had chosen a poor site for this battle as the land is marshy and their charge became disjointed, the line being broken before it reached the enemy. Meanwhile, the Hanoverians had improved their bayonet technique and this enabled them to withstand the charge and inflict severe casualties among their attackers. Jacobite losses were already high because of an earlier artillery barrage. About 1250 Jacobites were killed in the actual fighting while the Hanoverians had comparatively light casualty figures with 52 killed.

The real infamy of Culloden was its aftermath. The Duke of Cumberland, son of George II, was commanding the government force and he ordered the execution of all 1500 prisoners, two thirds of whom were already wounded. He then began a campaign to hunt down the rest of the Jacobite force and its sympathisers. Cumberland is known to history as "the Butcher" but he was his father's son and no better or worse than anyone else in the despised and despicable House of Hanover.

As for Charles Edward Stuart, he wandered the Highlands and Hebrides for some five months before he was able to escape back to France. His adventures in this period, when he was constantly pursued with a bounty of £30,000 on his head, have become the stuff of legend, especially his involvement with Flora Macdonald (1722 – 1790). The famous Skye Boat Song recalls one of his journeys. In fact, he was not a romantic figure at all. It was largely due to his arrogance and incompetence that so many of his followers were killed at Culloden. He became a dissolute, no better than the Hanoverians really, and spent the rest of his life in exile.

the cricket

Meanwhile, back in the civilised world, the cricket season had begun.

single wicket

Monday, 21 July. There was a four-a-side match at the Artillery Ground between Four Millers of Bray Mills in Berkshire and Four Best Players of Addington. It was played for fifty pounds but the result is unknown. Thomas Waymark was by this time employed at Bray Mills and so he was probably involved.

Wednesday, 6 August. A three-a-side game in the Artillery Ground involving "six players esteemed the best in England". The teams were Long Robin's Side including Robert Colchin, John Bryant (both Bromley) and Joe Harris (Addington) versus Stephen Dingate (Surrey), Val Romney (Sevenoaks) and Richard Newland (Slindon). Stephen Dingate's side won the match (DC). Hundreds of pounds were lost and won over the game (ASW).

significant matches

Bromley v Addington

Bromley Common, Bromley, Kent

Monday, 12 May 1746

Addington won "with great difficulty" (CS)

"On Monday next they play their second match at Mr Smith's, Pyd-Horse".

Addington v Bromley

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 19 May 1746

result unknown (ASW)

This is the return match referred to in CS. The notice is in ASW but no match details were reported. In CS, the date is given as 26 May but that is incorrect.

Addington & Lingfield v Surrey & London

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 9 June 1746

A&L won (GB18)

"A Kent man assisted Surrey & London as a given man".

The match was reported in the General London Evening Mercury as Middlesex v Surrey but the above title seems to be more accurate. Addington & Lingfield (aka Middlesex) won "by a considerable number of notches".

Kent v Surrey

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 23 June 1746

result unknown (DC)

The Kent team consisted entirely of players from Bromley, Bexley and Eltham.

Kent & Surrey v Addington & Bromley

Duppas Hill, Croydon, Surrey

Monday, 7 July 1746

Kent & Surrey won by 4 runs (ASW)

The crowd was reported as "nearly ten thousand". Kipps of Eltham, the well-known wicketkeeper, played as a given man for Addington & Bromley. The title of the fixture indicates the strength of the Addington and Bromley clubs at this time.

The London Evening Post on Thursday, 3 July announced: "No person allowed to bring any liquour that don't (sic) live in the parish".

Addington & Bromley v Kent & Surrey

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 14 July 1746

result unknown (ASW)

This was a return fixture. Kipps of Eltham again played as a given man for Addington & Bromley.

Kent v All-England

Bromley Common, Bromley, Kent

Saturday, 2 August 1746

result unknown (DC)

Originally scheduled for the previous day but postponed because "it was impossible for the noblemen and gentlemen to be present on the Friday".

All-England v Kent

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 4 August 1746

All-England won (DC)

No details known beyond the result.

London & Chislehurst v Addington

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 1 September 1746

result unknown (DC)

Played for fifty pounds and started at one o'clock but no other information is known.

other matches

London v Westminster

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Wednesday, 2 July 1746

result unknown (ASW)

No information is known.

London v Edmonton

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Wednesday, 30 July 1746

result unknown (ASW)

No information is known.

London v Edmonton

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 25 August 1746

result unknown (DC)

No information is known. The game was evidently a return to the one on 30 July.

1747

the history

The 1747 parliamentary election resulted in a Whig government under Henry Pelham (1694 – 1754). In those days, voting was limited to landed gentry.

the cricket

The 1747 season is the first in which we read of matches being disrupted because of a parliamentary election.

DC refers to two intended games between Kent and All-England due to be played at Bromley Common on Monday, 29 June and at the Artillery Ground on Wednesday, 1 July. But both matches "are deferred on account of the gentlemen subscribers being engaged at several Elections".

single wicket

Monday, 6 July. Five of Slindon versus Five of Dartford at the Artillery Ground (ASW). This was the result of a challenge by Slindon, published in the Daily Advertiser on Monday, 29 June, to play ''five of any parish in England, for their own Sum''. The announcement advised interested parties: ''If it is accepted of by any, they are desir'd to go to Mr Smith, who has Orders to make Stakes for them''. The three Newland brothers all played. On Saturday, 4 July (TJM), George Smith announced in the same paper that ''five of Dartford in Kent, have made Stakes with him, and will play with the above Gentlemen at the Time and Place above mentioned for twenty Pounds''.

Wednesday, 8 July. Five of Slindon versus Five of Bromley at the Artillery Ground (GB18). Another game resulting from Slindon's challenge. The Newland brothers played for Slindon again.

Friday, 10 July. Five of Slindon versus Five of Hadlow at the Artillery Ground (TJM). Another game resulting from Slindon's five-a-side challenge. Details unknown.

Wednesday, 15 July. Five of Slindon versus Five of Hadlow at the Artillery Ground (TJM). A return game which suggests Hadlow might have won the first as Slindon, having issued the initial challenge, might wish to try for honours even. Details unknown.

In early August, there were two single wicket matches (TJM) at the Artillery Ground which were organised by the 2nd Duke of Richmond. In the first, three of his employees Stephen Dingate, Joseph Rudd and Pye defeated the two Bennetts and William Anderson. In the second, the same threes were to play again but in a "fives" match with the two Bryants added to the Duke's team and with Tom Faulkner and one of the Harrises to their opponents. The result of the second game is unknown.

Thomas Jure

Thomas Jure (dates of birth and death unknown) was a noted player for London Cricket Club and All-England. Known to have been a good batsman, he is first recorded on 9 July 1747 playing for Robert Colchin's XI versus William Hodsoll's XI at the Artillery Ground.

Jure was a noted single wicket competitor and later in the 1747 season he played in a high stakes "threes" tournament that also included Robert Colchin, John Harris, Val Romney, Stephen Dingate and Richard Newland. He is last mentioned in June 1749. His career therefore seems to have been short but there is no doubt he was deemed good enough to play at the highest level and must have been a leading player, if only for a few seasons.

Saturday, 5 September. Three-a-side game at the Artillery Ground: Long Robin's Side versus Stephen Dingate's Side. The teams were Robert Colchin, John Harris and Val Romney against Stephen Dingate, Richard Newland and Thomas Jure. It was played for sixty guineas per side and the players were specially chosen from those who had played in the Kent v All-England games above, so presumably they must have been the best performers in those matches.

It was ruled that "all Strokes behind as well as before Wickets" counted and in this respect the contest "differs from any Three Match ever play'd".

significant matches

Croydon & Addington v London

Duppas Hill, Croydon, Surrey

Friday, 29 May & Tuesday, 9 June 1747

C&A won (ASW)

Also recorded in DC. Apparently it was unfinished on 29 May and the players agreed to play it out more than a week later.

London v Croydon & Addington

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 1 & Tuesday, 2 June 1747

London won (ASW)

Also recorded in DC where it says the previous match being incomplete would "be played out on Tuesday next" at Duppas Hill.

Dartford v London

Dartford Brent, Dartford, Kent

Friday, 12 June 1747

result unknown (ASW)

No details reported.

London v Croydon & Addington

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 15 June 1747

result unknown (ASW)

Also recorded in DC which reports that they "have played two matches this season, and each won one with great difficulty, being two days playing each match".

London v Dartford

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 29 June 1747

result unknown (DC/ASW)

No details known other than that wickets were to be pitched at two o'clock.

Dartford v Hadlow

Dartford Brent, Dartford, Kent

Thursday, 2 July 1747

result unknown (PVC)

This was pre-announced in the Penny London Post of Wednesday, 1 July as "the deciding match" but there is no report of the game and no references to the earlier fixture(s).

John & Thomas Bell

John Bell (1718–1774) was a member of the England side which met Surrey in 1749 and ten years later kept wicket for Dartford against England. He was born at Dartford in 1718, his occupation probably being that of a shoemaker, a trade followed by several of his family. But in 1760 he took over the Eleven Cricketers public house on East Hill in Dartford, remaining there till his death in January 1774 at the age of fifty-five. A few days later the newspaper Bingley's London Journal referred to him as "the most noted cricketer in England". See Start of Play by David Underdown.

Thomas Bell, brother of John, also played for Dartford and All-England. In 1762, Thomas Bell was condemned to death at Maidstone Assizes for highway robbery, but was later reprieved.

Long Robin's XI v William Hodsoll's XI

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Thursday, 9 July 1747

result unknown (ASW)

A "scratch match" arranged by members of the London Club. Most players' names are known but no scores. The exact title is unknown but one team consisted mainly of players from London, Bromley and Slindon, the other mainly of players from Dartford and Hadlow. Teams were:

Long Robin's XI: Robert Colchin, John Bryant, James Bryant, John Bowra, "Little" Bennett, Thomas Jure, Richard Newland, Adam Newland, John Newland and two others

William Hodsoll's XI: William Hodsoll, Broad, John & Thomas Bell, Allen, J Harris, Tom Faulkner, John Larkin and others from the parish of Hadlow in Kent. It is not known which of John or Joseph Harris was involved.

Tom Faulkner's XI v John Bowra's XI

Kennington Common, Kennington, Surrey

Tuesday, 28 July 1747

result unknown (GB18)

This was billed as "Long Tom versus the Kentish Shepherd", those being the nicknames of Faulkner, who was also a prizefighter, and Bowra.

London v Ripley & Bromley

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 17 August 1747

result unknown (ASW)

A statement by Mr George Smith, the Keeper of the Artillery Ground: "These matches being attended with great Charge the Door, for the Future, will be Six-pence; Two-pence not being sufficient to defray the Expence".

The match was to be played for fifty guineas per side.

Ripley & Bromley v London

Ripley Green, Ripley, Surrey

Thursday, 20 August 1747

result unknown (ASW)

No details reported.

London v Hadlow

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 24 August 1747

result unknown (ASW)

Hadlow, near Tonbridge in Kent, was stated to be "a famous parish for cricket".

Robert Eures

Robert Eures (dates of birth and death unknown) came from Bexley in Kent and played for Kent county cricket teams as well as for All-England. He is known to have been a good batsman and he was frequently involved in single-wicket tournaments which were very popular during his career and attracted high stakes.

Eures was first recorded in the Daily Advertiser on 31 August 1747 playing for Kent against All-England at the Artillery Ground. In 1749 he played for a very strong All-England team against Surrey, which was the leading county team that season. In 1752, Eures was named as one of the three principal players when the famous Dartford Cricket Club issued a challenge to "the rest of England". Dartford's challenge was that with William Hodsoll, John Bryant, Robert Eures and "eight players from the parish of Dartford" it could take on and defeat any eleven players from the rest of England! The match was due to be played on 29 July 1752 at Dartford Brent but unfortunately no result has been found and it might have been rained off.

That is the last mention of Robert Eures as match reports decreased after 1752 and then the sport itself went into decline during the Seven Years War. Given that his earliest reference was in 1747, it seems unlikely that he was a veteran of the 1730s. He was probably born in the early 1720s, made his name in the 1740s and, all being well, retired in the 1760s.

All-England v Kent

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 31 August 1747

result unknown (ASW)

This game and the next one were the two postponed earlier in the season because of the Parliamentary Election.

Another statement from George Smith: "The Town may be certain that the taking Six-pence Admittance is out of no avaricious Temper. Two-pence being greatly insufficient to the Charge that attends the Matches, which Mr Smith is ready and willing to make appear to any Gentleman".

The advertised teams (in the Daily Advertiser on Monday, 31 August) were:

Kent: Robert Colchin, John Bryant, James Bryant (all Bromley), Val Romney, – Kipps, John Mansfield (all Sevenoaks), John & Thomas Bell (both Dartford), – Jones, John Larkin (both Hadlow), Robert Eures (Bexley).

All-England: Richard Newland (Slindon), – Green (Amberley, Sussex), Stephen Dingate, "Little" Bennett, Thomas Jure (all London), Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, – Broad, George Jackson (all Addington), William Sawyer (Richmond), – Maynard (Surrey).

Kent v All-England

Bromley Common, Bromley, Kent

Wednesday, 2 September 1747

result unknown (ASW)

No details reported. This match was advertised at the same time as the first one and not subsequently.

john larkin

John Larkin (1726–1782) was of the ''most famed parish of Hadlow'', as it was called in 1747 when he must have been one of its best players. He seems to have had a lengthy career and was still playing in the 1770s.

john mansfield

John Mansfield (dates of birth and death unknown) played for Kent. He was a good batsman who played for the same Sevenoaks club as Val Romney. Mansfield was adept at the single wicket form of the game which was very popular during his career. He is first mentioned as a member of the strong Kent team that played against All-England at the Artillery Ground on 31 August 1747.

In the 1749 season, he played for All-England himself, against Surrey. He appears in a number of teams after this as a given man or as a member of a "best eleven", as well as in single wicket. He is last recorded playing as a given man for Addington Cricket Club against Westminster in July 1752.

There was a later Mansfield, first name unknown and apparently an amateur, who played for an All-England team in 1778.

other matches

Croydon & Addington v Greenwich & Deptford

Duppas Hill, Croydon, Surrey

Wednesday, 13 May 1747

result unknown (PVC)

Pre-announced in the London Evening Post on Saturday, 9 May but no report of the game was found.

1748

the history

The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle formally ended each of the War of the Austrian Succession in Europe; King George's War in North America; and the First Carnatic War in India. It was only a respite because Britain and France went to war again in 1751 with a fresh outbreak of hostilities in India.

the cricket

Single wicket games, in "threes" and "fives", were the vogue and have never been so popular before or since.

George Smith, keeper of the Artillery Ground and landlord of the adjoining Pyed Horse in Chiswell Street, declared bankruptcy. Evidently his pricing problems of recent years did have some basis in needing to balance the books after all. A number of notices appeared in the press during the first six months of 1748 but Smith eventually resolved his problems, perhaps through the sale of other property, and was able to retain control of the Artillery Ground until 1752. (GB18)

In 1748, an action of Jeffreys v Parsons was heard before the King's Bench. The case concerned wagers that were almost certainly made on the above two Kent v All-England games, with Jeffreys claiming 25 guineas won from Parsons on each game. The parties came to an out of court agreement after the case was held over. (ASW)

Thursday, 4 August. There was a game somewhere in Kent between teams representing the Hills and the Dales of the county. This sounds like a similar idea to the early match at Chevening in the year 1610; and may have been commemorative.

Durling

The Surrey and All-England cricketer called Durling (first name, date of birth and date of death unknown) was a noted player although nothing is known of him outside mentions in match reports.

He played for the famous Addington Cricket Club and he is first recorded in the 1748 season when he took part in a "fives" match for high stakes alongside other leading players of the day, his team winning. Earlier the same year, on 6 June, in another "fives" game between Addington and "The Rest of England excluding Kent", Addington's players were Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, John Harris, George Jackson and the shoemaker that lately came out of Kent! As Durling was himself apparently new that season, it is possible that he was the mysterious shoemaker!

In 1749, when All-England played his native Surrey and were a man short, they picked Durling from their opponents to complete the side. Later that year, when Addington played All-England in a "fives" match, Durling played for a very strong Addington side alongside Faulkner, Jackson and the Harris brothers.

Durling features in big matches through the 1750s, playing against Hambledon in 1756 and for All-England on other occasions including the games against Dartford in 1759. He is last recorded in the 1761 season.

single wicket

Monday 6 June. A "fives" game between Addington and The Rest, excluding Kent. Addington's players were Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, John Harris, George Jackson and "the shoemaker that lately came out of Kent": i.e., Durling! Their opponents were Stephen Dingate, "Little" Bennett, Maynard, Collins and Thomas Waymark.

June (date unknown). Tom Faulkner beat Robert Colchin at single wicket by one wicket. Colchin scored 40 and 5; Faulkner scored 45 and 1*. It was played sometime in June on Bromley Common (ASW).

Friday, 24 June. "Three servants of the 2nd Duke of Richmond" played "Three of London" at the Artillery Ground. The result is unknown but the match started quite late at four o'clock. Richmond's team was Stephen Dingate, Joseph Rudd and Pye; London's three were "Little" Bennett, "Tall" Bennett and William Anderson. Reported in the London Evening Post on Saturday, 25 June.

Saturday, 25 June. A return single-wicket match between Robert Colchin and Tom Faulkner on Addington Hill. This time Colchin won by 2 runs. He made 7 and 12; Faulkner replied with 11 and 6.

Monday, 4 July. A third game between Colchin and Faulkner, "each having previously won one", on the Artillery Ground. Unfortunately, there are no match details this time.

Monday, 4 July. Also on the Artillery Ground, Thomas Waymark and Darville played as "Two of Berkshire" against "Little" Bennett and George Smith of London. George Smith was allowed an unnamed substitute in the field. Waymark and Darville won. Darville was the owner of Bray Mills, where Waymark worked at this time. George Smith, evidently having resolved his financial problems, was still the landlord of the famous Py'd Horse and keeper of the Artillery Ground.

Wednesday, 6 July. A "fives" match on the Artillery Ground: Tom Faulkner's Side beat Stephen Dingate's Side by one wicket. Two runs were required when the last man went in. The teams were: Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, William Anderson, "Little" Bennett and "Tall" Bennett versus Stephen Dingate, Joseph Rudd, Pye, James Bryant and John Bryant.

Wednesday, 13 July & Friday, 15 July. The same two teams of "fives" met again on the Artillery Ground. Play was interrupted by rain on the Wednesday after one side had completed its first innings, scoring 13. The match continued on the Friday. No further details are known but, as an apparent decider was played on Wednesday, 27 July, perhaps Dingate's team won this one.

Wednesday, 27 July. Another "fives" game between Tom Faulkner and Stephen Dingate on the Artillery Ground. Faulkner won. This match may have been a decider; in which case Dingate must have won the second match on Friday, 15 July. The teams were not the same as before: Stephen Dingate, Richard Newland, Joseph Rudd, Maynard (of Surrey) and "Little" Bennett versus Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, Durling (of Addington), James and John Bryant.

Monday, 8 August. Tom Faulkner and Joe Harris played Robert Colchin and Val Romney at "twos" in the Artillery Ground for twenty guineas a side. Result unknown. Immediately afterwards, there was return of the Waymark/Darville versus Bennett/Smith game, with Smith again allowed a substitute fielder.

Saturday, 20 August. A "fives" game in the Artillery Ground. The teams were: Robert Colchin, John Colchin, James and John Bryant and Robert Lascoe versus Joe Harris, Maynard, John Capon, William Anderson and Walker.

Monday, 22 August. A "fives" game in the Artillery Ground for 20 guineas a side: Five of Berkshire (Thomas Waymark, Darville and three others) versus Five of London (William Anderson, "Little" and "Tall" Bennett, John Capon and George Carter). London won (GB18).

Monday, 29 August. A "fives" game at the Artillery Ground in which Tom Faulkner's Side defeated Long Robin's Side by four runs. The prize was 200 pounds. Val Romney was badly injured and could not run but, the rules being "play or pay", he was obliged to play as well as he could. Teams were Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, James Bryant, John Bryant and Durling versus Robert Colchin, Val Romney, John Larkin, Jones and Maynard.

Monday, 5 September. Three of England versus Five of Berkshire played for 20 guineas in the Artillery Ground. The teams were Robert Colchin, Tom Faulkner and George Smith versus Thomas Waymark and four others of Berkshire. George Smith was not allowed a substitute as in previous games and had to do his share of the fielding. Result unknown.

Friday, 16 September. Robert Colchin and Thomas Waymark defeated Tom Faulkner and Joe Harris in the Artillery Ground. It was announced beforehand that "in case of rain, there is good shelter for the spectators". Apparently the match gave such great satisfaction that an immediate return was arranged. Colchin & Waymark scored 10 and 17 against 0 and 15. In their first innings, Faulkner and Harris were both bowled second ball. Details were reported in the London Evening Post on Saturday, 17 September.

Saturday, 17 September. In the return of the previous day's "twos" match, Robert Colchin and Thomas Waymark again defeated Tom Faulkner and Joe Harris. The prize was fifty guineas.

Friday, 23 September. A "threes" game played in the Artillery Ground "for a considerable sum": Robert Colchin, Thomas Waymark and Maynard versus Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris and John Bryant. Result unknown.

significant matches

Kent v All-England

Dartford Brent, Dartford, Kent

Friday, 10 June 1748

Kent won by 11 runs (ASW)

"It was esteemed all of a curious match, the odds being two to one on each side playing".

All-England v Kent

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 13 June 1748

Kent won (ASW/DC)

No details are known other than that Kent won and play commenced at two o'clock.

London v Croydon

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 18 July 1748

result unknown (DC)

Wickets to be pitched at 2 o'clock.

other matches

Lambeth v London

Peckham Rye Common, south London

Tuesday, 14 June 1748

London won (GB18)

There was a brief report in the Whitehall Evening Post on Thursday, 16 June.

London v Deptford & Greenwich

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 15 August 1748

result unknown (DC)

Robert Colchin played as a given man for London; Tom Faulkner as a given man for Deptford & Greenwich.

Deptford & Greenwich v London

Siddle's Ground, Deptford, Kent

Tuesday, 23 August 1748

result unknown (DC)

The venue was reported as "Mr Siddle's new cricket-ground at Deptford".

1749

the history

1749 was an unusual year because Great Britain was at peace! Music and literature flourished and the highlights of the year were Handel's Royal Fireworks Music, which was premiered in London on Thursday 27 April; and Henry Fielding's classic novel The History of Tom Jones.

The Bartholomews

There were three noted Surrey cricketers called Bartholomew in the mid-18th century. It is not known if any of them were related.

ASW records a game in the 1749 English cricket season at White Conduit Fields on 2 August involving 22 members of the London Cricket Club. The report states that the venue was in use before 1720 but that the White Conduit Club was not established until 1780. On the site was the White Conduit Tavern, erected in about 1648, and this was a favourite halting-place for those who had walked out a short distance from London. In 1749, the Tavern was owned by William Curnock and shortly afterwards by Robert Bartholomew (died 1766), the Surrey cricketer.

In 1750, we find the same Robert Bartholomew playing for Surrey versus Kent at Dartford Brent, Kent winning by 3 wickets.

In 1766, PVC records the death on Thursday 6 February of Robert Bartholomew. He had played for Surrey in the 1750s and may well have been related to the Bartholomews who played for Chertsey in the 1770s. He was the master of the Angel Inn at Islington (note: well-known to Monopoly enthusiasts) and also of White Conduit House.

The other two Bartholomews are Chertsey Cricket Club players who appear on scorecards in the 1770s. On the cards of three Chertsey matches in the 1775 season, they are recorded as Rev Bartholomew senior and Mr Bartholomew junior. It is believed that the junior was William Bartholomew, who also played for Surrey teams at the time, including matches in 1773 for which scorecards have survived. The senior is believed to be Reverend Charles Bartholomew, a Chertsey Club stalwart who played occasionally in the 1770s but may have been a regular in times past.

the cricket

The popularity of single-wicket may have waned as there is a greater proportion of eleven a side games in the year's reports.

ASW reports a game at White Conduit Fields on Wednesday, 2 August involving 22 members of the London Club. The report states that the venue was in use before 1720 but that the White Conduit Club was not established until 1780. On the site was the White Conduit Tavern, erected in about 1648, and this was a "favourite halting-place for those who had walked out a short distance from London". In 1749, the Tavern was owned by William Curnock and shortly afterwards by Robert Bartholomew, the Surrey cricketer.

single wicket

Monday, 10 July. Five of All-England defeated Five of Addington at the Artillery Ground. The match was played for fifty guineas a side and was the result of a challenge by the Addington players to meet any other five in England. Betting was 8-1 in favour of Addington.

Addington: Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, John Harris, George Jackson, Durling.

All-England: Robert Colchin, John Bryant, Robert Eures, John Bell, Thomas Waymark.

Monday, 17 July. In a return match, the same Addington five beat the same All-England five for fifty guineas.

Wednesday, 26 July. In a deciding match, All-England won by 2 runs. They scored 11 and 12; Addington replied with 16 and 5. The prize this time was 100 guineas. All-England made two changes to their team with James Bryant and Val Romney replacing John Bell and Thomas Waymark. Addington's five were unchanged.

significant matches

London & Bromley v Addington

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 29 May 1749

result unknown (ASW/DC)

No details reported.

All-England v Surrey

Dartford Brent, Dartford, Kent

Friday, 2 & Saturday, 3 June 1749

Surrey won by 2 wickets (ASW/CS)

All-England scored 89 and 42; Surrey replied with 73 and 59-8. No individual performances are known.

All-England: Robert Colchin, William Hodsoll, Robert Eures, Val Romney, John Larkin, Jones, John Bell, John Mansfield, Richard Newland, Joseph Rudd, Durling.

Surrey: Stephen Dingate, Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, John Harris, George Jackson, Maynard, ? Bennett, John Bryant, James Bryant, Humphreys, John Frame.

It is not known which of "Little" or "Tall" Bennett played for Surrey.

All-England had Durling of Addington (in Surrey) as a given man; Surrey had James and John Bryant as given men. The Bryants were natives of Bromley in Kent. John Frame was associated with Dartford but was actually born in Surrey, at Warlingham in 1733.

All-England v Surrey

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 5 June 1749

drawn (ASW/CS)

All-England scored 71 and 47. Surrey scored 89 in their first innings but bad light prevented them chasing their target of 30. Presumably the match had to be finished (or left unfinished) on the one day. No individual performances are known.

The two teams were unchanged from the match on 2 & 3 June.

London v Richmond & Ripley

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Wednesday, 21 June 1749

result unknown (ASW/DC)

No details reported.

Long Robin's XI v Stephen Dingate's XI

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 26 June 1749

result unknown (ASW/DC)

The game was arranged by the members of the London Cricket Club and played for a hundred guineas a side.

William Hodsoll was due to play for one side or the other but had to withdraw. It is not known who replaced him.

Long Robin's XI: Robert Colchin, John Bryant, John Mansfield, James Bryant, John Bell, Robert Eures, Val Romney, Durling, John Colchin, John Bowra, John Larkin.

Stephen Dingate's XI: Stephen Dingate, Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, John Harris, George Jackson, John Frame, Humphreys, "Little" Bennett, Tom Peake, John Capon, Thomas Jure.

John Frame

The above references to John Frame (1733–11 October 1796) are the first links with the "Glory Days" of the 1770s as he played until 1774. He was a great fast bowler who played mostly for Dartford, where he lived, though he was born at Warlingham in Surrey. He was described by John Nyren as one of the Hambledon Club's greatest opponents. He was only 16 in June 1749. Nyren says he remembers little of Frame, except that he was an unusually stout man for a cricketer.

other matches

Hastings v Pevensey

venue unknown

? June 1749

result unknown (ASW)

Hardly any details are known but it was apparently played for a hundred guineas.

London v Bearsted (Kent)

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 14 August 1749

London won "with great ease" (GB18)

It was stated that Bearsted was the best team in Kent, having beaten all other parishes in their neighbourhood.

Monday, 28 August. ASW records Long Robin's XI v Tom Faulkner's XI at the Artillery Ground for sixty guineas a side but the teams were not top-class and had several players "making up the numbers".

Tuesday, 29 August. Portsmouth versus Fareham & Titchfield on Portsmouth Common was until quite recently believed to be the earliest reference to an actual match being played in Hampshire, but we now have information about two games played in 1733, one of which was at Titchfield. Cricket was first recorded in Hampshire in 1647. The Portsmouth team, which was described as "those living on the Common", won by great odds. (GB18)

1750

the history

28 July. Death of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750), the great German composer

the cricket

April. Death of Robert Colchin in Bromley, aged 36 (buried on 30 April). He was arguably the greatest player of the 1740s and seemingly the most influential.

Wednesday, 8 August. Death of Charles Lennox (1701 – 1750), the 2nd Duke of Richmond, who was arguably the greatest of the game's early patrons, particularly of the Slindon Club and of Sussex cricket in general. His death was followed by an immediate slump in Sussex cricket and it is not until 1766 that a recovery can be discerned.

In ASW, Mr Ashley-Cooper gives the opinion that the famous Hambledon Club was founded in or about 1750, but there is no evidence to support this view and the fact is that it is not known when the club started. As the team was playing top-class cricket in 1756 (i.e., the earliest matches it is known of), it seems likely that a local club of some kind was founded much earlier than 1750 as it must have risen to a position of prominence in Hampshire before being able to take on the likes of Dartford from 1756.

It is possible, as with many later county clubs, that a parish club was in existence for a long time and was then subject to substantial reorganisation after its team became famous. This might explain the many "origins" of the Hambledon Club up to about 1767!

single wicket

Thursday, 26 July. Five of Richmond played Five of London for a guinea a man on the Artillery Ground. No details are known. (ASW)

Monday, 10 September. The first of three "fives" between Stephen Dingate and Tom Faulkner at the Artillery Ground. Faulkner won this one, which was played for fifty guineas. Teams were: Stephen Dingate, John Bryant, James Bryant, John & Thomas Bell versus Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, John Harris, Durling and Perry.

Friday, 14 September. The second match ended in a tie, both sides totalling nine. As single-wicket rules applied, all batsmen were out. It is known they were all bowled (but not who by) except for Dingate who was caught in the 2nd innings, Thomas Bell who was run out in the 2nd innings and Joe Harris who was caught in the 2nd innings (apparently while trying to hit the winning run).

Monday, 17 September. The third and deciding game of "fives" was won by Tom Faulkner's side by an innings and one run. Dingate's team scored 10 & 18 but Faulkner's scored 29. Interestingly, the individual figures in the recorded score of Dingate's second innings add up to 20 but 18 was definitely the correct total so one or more of the individual scores was wrong.

significant matches

Two Elevens

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 18 June 1750

result unknown (ASW/DC)

The teams played for 50 guineas and were composed entirely of players from Kent, London, Middlesex and Surrey.

Kent v Surrey

Dartford Brent, Dartford, Kent

Friday, 6 July 1750

Kent won by 3 wickets (ASW/CS)

Surrey scored 57 and 36; Kent replied with 54 and 40-7. No individual scores are known but the teams are.

Kent: William Hodsoll, Rawlins, John Bryant, James Bryant, Garrett, John & Thomas Bell, Broad, Val Romney, Thomas Brandon, Howard.

Surrey: Stephen Dingate, Tom Faulkner, Joe Harris, John Harris, George Jackson, Robert Bartholomew, John Frame, ? Frame, Maynard, John Capon, Perry.

Perry was possibly related to the player who took part with Piper of Hampton in the 1726 single-wicket contest. It is not known the name of John Frame's brother.

Kent was without Robert Colchin, who had died in April aged 36.

Kent v Surrey

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Monday, 9 July 1750

Surrey won by 9 wickets (ASW/CS)

A return match. Kent scored 53 and 55; Surrey replied with 80 and 29-1 to win with some ease. The teams were unchanged from the first match but again no individual scores are known.

Dartford v Addington

Dartford Brent, Dartford, Kent

Tuesday, 17 July 1750

Dartford won by 6 runs (ASW/GB18)

Dartford scored 46 and 34; Addington replied with 39 and 35. it is known that William Hodsoll and the two Bryants all played for Dartford as given men. According to the London Evening Post on Thursday 19 July, Dartford lost their last five second innings wickets in five successive deliveries by a mixture of caught and bowled. But they still made enough to win.

Kent v Surrey

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Friday, 20 July 1750

Kent won by 1 wicket (ASW/DC)

Surrey scored 55 and 42; Kent replied with 63 and 35-9 to win a very tight contest.

A deciding match and again it was won by the team batting second. Five runs were still needed when the penultimate wicket fell. The teams were unchanged from the two previous matches but again we do not have individual scores.

The London Club ruled beforehand that players must reside in the county they play for. The Frames still lived at Warlingham in 1750, though John Frame was latterly associated with Dartford.

thomas brandon

Thomas Brandon (dates of birth and death unknown) played mainly for Dartford Cricket Club and Kent. He was a good batsman for Kent during the 1750s and regularly took part in single wicket contests. Little is known of him except that he was a shopkeeper in Dartford who also acted as a churchwarden. The earliest reference to Brandon is on 6 July 1750 when he played for Kent against Surrey at Dartford Brent. Kent won by 3 wickets. In 1759, he was a member of the Dartford team that twice defeated All-England.

other matches

London v Hampton

Artillery Ground, Bunhill Fields, Finsbury, London

Wednesday, 8 August 1750

unknown (ASW)

No details reported.

The History of Cricket: 1741 – 1745 | The History of Cricket: 1751 – 1760 | Index

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