The Hayward Fault at UC Berkeley

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At UC Berkeley, we feel close to the Hayward fault. Quite close. In McCone Hall, which recently underwent a renovation and a seismic retrofit, we are ~1500 feet from the fault.

On the Berkeley campus, the Hayward fault is well-known for running from "goal post to goal post" in Cal Memorial Stadium. We have put together a Mini-Tour of the Hayward Fault on campus as part of a larger virtual tour of The Geology of 'Bear Territory'. We also have a field trip guide to the Hayward fault on campus, put together by Peggy Hellweg.

Below is a 1923 contour map of the Berkeley area, from Claremont Creek to UC Berkeley, illustrating the landforms and main trace of the Hayward fault. Pat Williams, a UC Berkeley geologist, provided this map. You can easily recognize the outline of Memorial Stadium and the Greek Theater.

Click on this thumbnail map in order to retrieve a larger image.

Here are some photographs of the Hayward fault on the UC Berkeley campus. Some of these are taken from the Tour of Hayward Fault put together by Sue Hirschfeld at CSU Hayward, while others were shot by Lea Suzuki for the San Francisco Chronicle as part of a story on a new study on the Hayward fault.

Aerial photograph of the Hayward Fault, looking north toward the Claremont Hotel and UC Berkeley. The Claremont is the large white edifice in the lower right, while the UC Berkeley football stadium is near the center of the image.

Photograph courtesy of Sue Hirschfeld

Detailed drawing of the Hayward fault as it crosses Cal Memorial Stadium.

Photograph courtesy of Sue Hirschfeld

Photograph of the interior of the stadium, looking north from the south end. The sense of motion on the Hayward fault is such that the west half of the stadium (left side of the photograph) is moving north relative to the east side.

Photograph courtesy of Sue Hirschfeld

Visitors (geologists!) at the stadium, examining the displacement along the expansion joint at the south end of the stadium. the south end. The tower visible beyond the edge of the stadium is International House.

Photograph courtesy of Sue Hirschfeld

Photograph of the displacement in the expansion joint. Some of this displacement is due to creep along the Hayward fault, while some is due to differential settling. Approximately 13 inches of offset is observed at the top of the stadium.

Photograph courtesy of Sue Hirschfeld

Photograph from the top of the Stadium, looking down from the south end. The metal bar joins two sections of the Stadium across the expansion joint at the Hayward fault.

Photograph courtesy of Lea Suzuki and the San Francisco Chronicle

Another view of the offset in the south end of the Stadium. This photograph was taken from outside of the walls, looking up.

Photograph courtesy of Lea Suzuki and the San Francisco Chronicle

Cal Memorial Stadium was currently rated 'poor' in its seismic safety performance as part of the SAFER Program at UC Berkeley. The estimated building repair cost is over $14,000,000. for the stadium alone - and over $1 billion for retrofitting all the buildings on campus.


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Berkeley Seismological Laboratory
202 McCone Hall, UC Berkeley, Berkeley CA 94720-4760
Questions and comments to www@seismo.berkeley.edu
Copyright 2003, The Regents of the University of California.
Last modified: Tue Jul 12 16:34:36 PDT 2011