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Love wave

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  • development by Love  (in  Augustus Edward Hough Love (British geophysicist))

    ...between the crust and underlying mantle. His prediction was confirmed by recordings of the behaviour of waves in the surface layer of the Earth. He proposed a method—based on measurements of Love waves—to measure the thickness of the Earth’s crust. In addition to his work on geophysical theory, Love studied elasticity and wrote A Treatise on the Mathematical...

  • movement in earthquakes  (in  earthquake (geology): Principal types of seismic waves)

    Love and Rayleigh waves are guided by the free surface of the Earth. They follow along after the P and S waves have passed through the body of the planet. Both Love and Rayleigh waves involve horizontal particle motion, but only the latter type has vertical ground displacements. As Love and Rayleigh waves travel, they disperse into long wave trains, and, at substantial distances...

  • type of seismic wave  (in  seismic wave)

    Of the two surface seismic waves, Love waves—named after the British seismologist A.E.H. Love, who first predicted their existence—travel faster. They are propagated when the solid medium near the surface has varying vertical elastic properties. Displacement of the medium by the wave is entirely perpendicular to the direction of propagation and has no vertical or longitudinal...

  • use in geophysical surveys  (in  Earth exploration: Seismic refraction methods)

    ...wave, in which a particle moves in an elliptical path in the vertical plane from the source. The horizontal component of Rayleigh waves is probably the principal cause of damage from earthquakes. Love waves are another type of surface wave; they involve shear motion. Still other varieties of surface waves can be transmitted through low-velocity layers (channel waves) or along the surface of a...

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"Love wave." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Encyclopædia Britannica, 2011. Web. 17 Aug. 2011. <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/349519/Love-wave>.

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Love wave. (2011). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/349519/Love-wave

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