BIOGRAPHIES [Ca-Ch]

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Go straight to the biography of your choice by clicking on the appropriate link:

[Barry Cable]  [Darrell Cahill]  [John Cahill]  [Laurie Cahill]  [Tom Cain]  [Frank Caine]  [Tom Calder]  [Jim Caldwell]  [Craig Callaghan]  [Charles Cameron]  [Ernest Cameron]  [Basil Campbell]  [Bruce Campbell]  [Garnet Campbell]  [Graham Campbell]  [Grant Campbell]  [Hugh 'Bonny' Campbell]  [Wayne Campbell]  [Ken Caporn]  [Harry Carbon]  [Ray Card]  [Peter Carey]  [Wayne Carey]  [William Carkeek]  [Darren Carlson]  [Phil Carman]  [Syd Carman]  [Jack Carmody]  [Jack Carney]  [Fred Carpenter]  ['Barney' Carr]  [Dennis Carroll]  [Merv Carrott]  [Bruce Carter]  [Harold Carter]  [Noel Carter]  [Rod Carter]  [Geoff Case]  [Colin Casey]  [Richard Casey]  [Terry Cashion]  [Jack Cashman]  [Tony Casserly]  [Jeff Cassidy]  [Jack Cassin]  [John Cassin]  [Fred Castledine]  [Kevin Caton]  [Arnold Caust]  [Roy Cazaly]  [Albert Chadwick]  [Derek Chadwick]  [Newton Chandler]  [Vic Chanter]  [Wilfred Chaplin]  [Charles Chapman]  [Les Charge]  [Jack Charlesworth]  [Henry Chase]  [Barry Cheatley]  [John Cheel]  [Reginald Cherry]  [Keith Chessell]  [Harold Chesswass]  [John Chick]  [Richard Chirgwin]  [Scott Chisholm]  [Bob Chitty]  [Michael Christian]  [David Christie]  [Graham Christie]  [Dave 'Dolly' Christy]  [Colin Churchett]

Barry Cable (Perth, North Melbourne, East Perth)

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In 1970, Barry Cable, having already achieved virtually everything in football that was open to him - Tassie Medal, dual All Australian status, two Sandovers, five successive club champion awards, and participation in three premiership teams - moved from Perth to North Melbourne.  Former Collingwood identity Lou Richards, then a media commentator, and renowned for his 'kiss of death' predictions, famously contended that Cable, who "lacked pace", would end up languishing in the back pocket for North's reserves. 

Cable duly added a North Melbourne best and fairest award to his list of achievements, besides running 4th in the Brownlow, while Lou Richards went on doing what he did best, and most entertainingly - shooting himself repeatedly in the foot. 

The contention that Cable lacked pace was not without some justification.  Certainly he was slower than some of the other great rovers of the time, like Bill Walker, Bob Skilton and Keith Doncon.  However, what he may perhaps have lacked in pace he more than made up for in other areas.  Few players in the history of the game have matched Cable's uncanny ability for being where the ball was.  Moreover, his disposal skills by hand and foot were little short of impeccable.  Small wonder he attracted the attention of umpires - for the right reason, when Sandover or Brownlow votes were being allocated.

On returning home to Perth in 1971 Cable carried on more or less where he had left off, winning yet another club best and fairest award.  Two years later he did it again, and added a third Sandover for good measure.

As far as Barry Cable was concerned, there was only one major ambition remaining, and he needed to return to Victoria, and North Melbourne, in order to achieve it.  That ambition, needless to say, was involvement in a VFL premiership, and in his second stint at Arden Street he managed this not just once, but twice, in 1975 and 1977.

Returning home once more in 1978 Cable surprised many observers by accepting an offer to coach East Perth.  Yet again, however, it proved to be an informed decision as, after a tentative start to his coaching career, he took the Royals to the 1978 grand final, where they duly won a titanic tussle against, of all teams, Cable's old club, Perth.  Seriously inconvenienced as he was by a strained leg muscle and a broken bone in the hand, Cable's experience and calmness were nevertheless vital during a tempestuous final term in which East Perth had to hang on for dear life, eventually scraping home by just 2 points.  (Click here for a complete match review.)

Cable played on for one further season, eventually retiring after 384 senior club games (225 for Perth, 116 for North Melbourne, and 43 with East Perth).  For the majority of his career he had been a genuine superstar, and if the game over its history has seen any finer rovers it would be hard to imagine them being countable on the fingers of more than one hand.

As a non-playing coach Cable experienced significantly less success than as a player, although he did at least manage to get North Melbourne into the finals in two of his three full seasons in charge during the early 1980s.

Barry Cable was catapulted back into the headlines as a sixty-three year old in July 2007 when the Western Australian Football Commission decided to retrospectively award him a Simpson Medal for his performance in Western Australia's defeat of Victoria in the inaugural state of origin match at Subiaco Oval in 1977.  The decision served to reinforce Cable's status as one of the all time great players in football history as it meant that he had now won the award a record five times.

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Darrell Cahill (Port Adelaide)

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A top class golfer in addition to a footballer, Port Adelaide's Darrell Cahill was probably less fĂȘted than his older brother John, but was no less effective in his way.  Playing initially across half back or on a wing, but later mainly as a rover, he was hard working and industrious, and formed an excellent on ball partnership with Brian Cunningham.  His 263 league games between 1969 and 1982  included the winning grand finals of 1977, 1979 (when he was best afield), 1980 and 1981.  Darrell Cahill also represented South Australia 8 times.

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John Cahill (Port Adelaide, Collingwood, West Adelaide, Port Adelaide Magpies, South Adelaide)

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In 267 club and 29 state games John Cahill never performed with an intensity of effort below 100%.  To football followers who can recall seeing him play his very name is synonymous with courage.  However, 'Gentleman Jack' as he became known was also a superlatively skilled footballer, capable of taking a strong and sometimes spectacular mark as well as being a smooth ball handler and penetratingly accurate left foot kick.

Beginning with Port Adelaide in 1958 Cahill quickly developed into one of the state's top wingmen, thereby following in the footsteps of his uncle, Laurie Cahill, who had played the position with distinction for both South Adelaide and South Australia a couple of decades earlier.  Midway through his career, however, John Cahill was switched to centre, where he performed with equal distinction until replaced, late in his career, by another all time great in the shape of Russell Ebert.

A tremendous on-field leader, Cahill captained Port between 1967 and 1973.  He also skippered South Australia for three consecutive years and, after the 1969 Adelaide carnival, was selected as vice-captain of the All Australian team.  Some observers felt that South Australia's failure to maintain its challenge to the VFL in the 2nd half of that carnival's decisive game was attributable in no small way to Cahill's effectiveness being blunted after he pulled a muscle during the 2nd term; up to that point he had been the most influential figure in the match.

When John Cahill retired after the 1973 season he was still close to the peak of his form as 59 goals from a half forward flank and a 4th club best and fairest award proved.

As a coach, Cahill achieved a legendary reputation that few can rival, steering his beloved Port Adelaide to no fewer than 10 premierships, and sowing the seeds of an 11th.  Moreover, in two seasons with VFL side Collingwood he steered a mediocre combination to 3rd place on the ladder, while a brief stint at West Adelaide might easily, with a bit more luck, have yielded a flag.  Cahill was also Port Adelaide's inaugural AFL coach, and his illustrious standing at Alberton was amply demonstrated when the club opted to name its annual best and fairest award after him.  In 2005 he made a brief return to coaching when he took charge of Port Adelaide Magpies for a season, and promptly brought the club's three season finals drought to an end by steering them as far as the preliminary final, where they lost to the Eagles.

In September 2007 it was announced that Cahill would be returning to football as senior coach of the club for which he had played at colts level half a century earlier, South Adelaide. However, just 8 matches into the 2008 season he announced his resignation, attributing his decision to "external influences".

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Laurie Cahill (South Adelaide, Richmond, West Adelaide)

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A superb wingman or rover, who was a key factor in South Adelaide's dominance during the late 1930s, Laurie Cahill played 187 league games, won his club's best and fairest award in 1938-9, and was a regular South Australian interstate representative whose 11 state appearances included both of the croweaters' games at the 1937 Perth carnival.  Jeff Pash, who played with North Adelaide, and was a contemporary of Cahill for part of his career, later described the South champion as:

One of the best ever......showing that rare combination, long-striding speed and beautiful control of the ball.  Supremely fast and graceful, he had a magnificent running drop kick and was extremely quick to send his side deeply into the attack.  (See footnote 1)

While briefly stationed in Melbourne late in the 1943 season Cahill played 7 VFL games for Richmond including the grand final, when he was first rover in the Tigers' 12.14 (86) to 11.15 (81) defeat of Essendon.  A week earlier, his superb 3 goal performance in the preliminary final against Fitzroy had been a key reason for Richmond's advancement.  The Richmond flag win was Cahill's third as he had previously starred for South Adelaide in grand final victories over Port Adelaide in both 1935 and 1938 (latter match reviewed here).

After the war, Laurie Cahill had stints as coach of his former club (1947-8 and 1957) as well as West Adelaide (1953-6), steering the latter to two losing grand finals against Port Adelaide.  His nephew, John Cahill, went on to become one of South Australia's greatest ever players and coaches.

Laurie Cahill was chosen at centre wing in South Adelaide's official 'Greatest Team'.

Footnotes

1.  The Pash Papers by Jeff Pash, page 31.  Return to Main Text

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Tom Cain (Subiaco, East Fremantle, South Fremantle)

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On a per capita basis, Western Australia has arguably produced more top quality ruckmen than any other state, and Tom Cain affords an excellent early example.  His name may not carry quite the same resonance as the likes of McIntosh, Farmer, Clarke or Moss, but he was in some ways the template on which all of them - particularly Farmer - were based.  An extremely tactically astute footballer, his masterful use of attacking handball was arguably ahead of its time, and his reading of the play was superb - qualities he put to good use as a coach after his playing days were over.

Those playing days commenced in 1912 with Subiaco, with his arrival representing one of the final pieces in a jig-saw that was to bring the club its first ever league pennant that very year.  The Maroons secured that pennant with a 5.8 (38) to 4.5 (29) challenge final defeat of East Fremantle, with Tom Cain being listed high among the victors' best players.  When Subiaco went 'back to back' the following year with a 2 goal challenge final victory over Perth, Cain was again a conspicuous and wholehearted contributor, with his passion for the cause being amply evidenced by his getting reported for using foul language.

In 1914 Cain was one of seven Subiaco footballers selected to represent Western Australia at the 1914 Sydney carnival, where he played in 4 of the team's 5 matches.  He continued in good form in 1915 when he helped the Maroons, who had slumped to 3rd the previous year, mount a renewed assault on the premiership.  That assault was ultimately successful, but sadly for Cain he missed the grand final win over Perth with injury.

The 1916 season found Tom Cain at East Fremantle, where his 56 games included the losing grand finals of 1917 and 1919, and the premiership victory of 1918 against East Perth.  In 1920 he joined South Fremantle where he added 17 games in two seasons, besides captain-coaching the side (to 5th place) in 1921.  His final season as a player came in 1922 back at Subiaco where he took his final tally of league appearances with that club to 62.

As a non-playing coach, Cain had stints at two of the three clubs for which he had played.   He commenced with Subi in 1924, and in three seasons at the helm oversaw 1st, 2nd and 2nd place finishes.  His coaching pedigree was further reinforced in 1927 when, in his sole season in charge of South Fremantle, he managed to get the team into its first grand final in a decade, only for East Perth to prove too strong, and get home in the end by 21 points.  Subiaco meanwhile commenced a gradual period of decline from which the club would not fully recover for the better part of half a century.

During his comparatively brief involvement in top level football, Tom Cain's impact, as both player and coach, was considerable, and it is at least arguable that his name ought to be somewhat more celebrated today than it is.

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Frank Caine (Carlton, North Melbourne, Essendon)

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A dynamic, long kicking, high-flying forward, Frank Caine joined Carlton from Rose of Northcote and gave the club excellent service in 80 VFL games between 1905 and 1909, during which he booted 147 goals.  He was the club's leading goal kicker with 25 goals in his debut season and 32 a couple of seasons later.  Caine played on a half forward flank for the Blues in the winning grand finals of 1906 against Fitzroy and 1907 against South Melbourne, as well as in the losing challenge final of 1909, also against South (match reviewed here).  An injury sustained late in the 1908 season prevented him from fronting up in that year's finals series, and probably robbed him of the chance to play in a third successive flag-winning team.  

At the end of the 1909 season, he was one of several Carlton players to quit the club in disgust over the treatment of Jack Worrall, the Blues' highly successful but controversially authoritarian coach.   The 1910 season found Caine at North Melbourne where he was a stunning success, kicking 75 goals for the year to top the Association list, and starring across half forward in a 9.14 (68) to 5.9 (39) grand final defeat of Brunswick.  Known by this time as 'Silver', because of his prematurely greying hair, Frank Caine spent two seasons with North before returning to the VFL, and linking up once more with former mentor Worrall, at Essendon.  It was an auspicious return, as the Same Old went top, with Caine playing a key role at centre half forward in the grand final victory over South Melbourne.  He spent another couple of seasons at Essendon and when he eventually retired had added 22 more VFL games and 33 goals to his respective tallies.

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Tom Calder (North Hobart, Ascot, South Melbourne, Mayne, Coorparoo)

by Murray Bird and Peter Blucher

Tom Calder was a brilliant and dashing Coorparoo utility player, originally from Tasmania, who had an extraordinary football career despite having just one kidney. He played with North Hobart in 1935, representing Southern Tasmania versus Northern Tasmania, before heading to Brisbane, playing a handful of games in 1940 with Ascot, which temporarily replaced Mayne in the Queensland competition. Calder served in the air force from 1939-45, playing football wherever and whenever possible. He played 5 VFL games for South Melbourne in 1945 before heading north again, playing with Mayne in 1946, before switching to Coorparoo. Super fit in his later days, he represented Queensland in 1946-7-8-9-50-52-3, including 1948 as captain-coach, and won the Grogan Medal in 1948 and again in 1950 as a  thirty-two year-old. He was later assistant secretary of the league.

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Jim Caldwell (Williamstown, South Melbourne, Perth, Carlton)

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Jim Caldwell commenced his senior career with Williamstown, and was on a wing as the side beat West Melbourne by 18 points in the 1907 VFA grand final.  In 1909 he crossed to South Melbourne where he overcame the disappointment of missing that year's winning grand final against Carlton through suspension to develop into one of the finest centreline players in the VFL.  Pacy, polished and poised, Caldwell was a cut above the majority of his opponents in most facets of the game, and was particularly renowned for his impeccably accurate foot passing.  A regular 'Big V' representative, he spent his last few seasons with South as a rover, from which position he skippered the side to the 1918 premiership.  In eleven straight seasons with the red and whites, Caldwell played 155 games and booted 34 goals.  He returned to Williamstown as captain in 1920 before crossing to Perth as captain-coach in 1923.  Caldwell spent two seasons with the Redlegs, playing a total of 13 league games, but as a coach he failed to propel the side to anything remotely resembling greatness, overseeing just 4 wins and a draw from 28 matches. Returning to the VFL once more in 1925, Caldwell spent part of the season as non-playing coach of Carlton.

Jim Caldwell's impact on the Williamstown Football Club was considerable, and not surprisingly he was adjudged worthy of inclusion in the club's official 'Team of the Century', which was announced in May 2003.

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Craig Callaghan (Swan Districts, Fremantle, St Kilda)

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Craig Callaghan commenced his league career with Swan Districts in 1993 aged seventeen, and finished it with the same club thirteen years later.  He played a total of 79 games for Swans, and was a dual winner of the club's fairest and best award, the Swan Medal.  In 1995 he was a member of Fremantle's inaugural AFL squad, playing a total of 95 games and kicking 69 goals in half a dozen seasons at the club.  Hard working, courageous and skilful, he typically picked up numerous possessions during a game, but often seemed to do so almost surreptitiously.  At the end of the 2000 season he was somewhat surprisingly released by the Dockers and ended up at St Kilda, where he played 29 games and booted 25 goals in 2001-2.  A serious knee injury effectively derailed his AFL career, and in 2005, after two knee reconstructions, he resumed in the WAFL with Swans.  Midway through the 2006 season a recurrence of his knee problems precipitated his retirement as a player.  In addition to his club games Craig Callaghan made 2 state of origin appearances for Western Australia.

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Charles Cameron (North Melbourne & Fitzroy)

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One of the finest wingmen of his day, and one of the best players to represent North Melbourne during that club's dismal first decade in the VFL, Charlie Cameron joined the shinboners from Thornbury CYMS in 1926.  Over the next nine seasons he played 122 senior games for North, kicking 19 goals; he also represented the VFL on no fewer than 11 occasions, including the 1930 Adelaide carnival, when he was one of the victorious 'Big V' side's best performers.

Cameron finished his VFL career at Fitzroy, where he added another 23 games, mainly as a forward or half forward, and booted 52 goals.

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Ernest Cameron (Essendon)

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Arguably the finest VFL rover of his generation, Ernie Cameron's name would undoubtedly be much more famous today had he not been forced into premature retirement after breaking a leg during Essendon's semi final win over South Melbourne in 1912.  At the time, he was only twenty-three years of age.  Quick, tenacious, brave and resourceful, he had arguably been the dominant player in the competition for the previous two seasons.  During the 1911 carnival in Adelaide, he stood head and shoulders above every other player in the VFL side, while in 1912 he was listed almost weekly in Essendon's best and fairest player listings.  In both years he was voted Essendon's best and fairest award.  Cameron's 113 VFL appearances for the Same Old included a starring role in the club's 5.11 (41) to 4.11 (35) defeat of Collingwood in the 1911 premiership decider.  He also played in the losing final of 1908 against Carlton.  For much of his career, Cameron combined with Alan Belcher and Fred Baring to give Essendon one of the most damaging and effective first ruck combinations in football history.

After his enforced retirement as a player, Ernie Cameron served for several years on the VFL Umpires Board.  He was also heavily involved in cricket, managing the Australian team that toured England in 1919, and acting as secretary of the North Melbourne Cricket Club.

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Basil Campbell (St Marys & South Fremantle)

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An exuberantly aggressive, virile, all action type of player, Basil Campbell was a real crowd favourite - with his own team's supporters - wherever he played.  The helmet that he wore after a head injury made him instantly recognisable, but his style of play was such that he would still have been a highly noticeable figure even had he not been so adorned.

Described as a "solidly built, ready made league footballer" (see footnote 1) when he joined South Fremantle in 1975, Campbell lined up at centre half forward for the red and whites in that season's grand final against West Perth.  However, it was a game all South Fremantle supporters would prefer to forget, as the Cardinals raced away to a record 104 point victory.  Five seasons later, however, Campbell finally tasted premiership success; in what was a veritable feast of vibrant, skilful, attacking football, he was a solid contributor to South Fremantle's 23.18 (156) to 15.8 (98) grand final defeat of Swan Districts in 1980 (reviewed here).

Another career highlight was participation in the very first state of origin match at Subiaco Oval in 1977.  Lining up on a half back flank, Campbell was delighted to be an honorary sandgroper as Western Australia blitzed Victoria by 94 points.  Sadly, this proved to be Basil Campbell's only interstate appearance.

Although his top level football career was only comparatively brief, Basil Campbell's crowd pleasing approach to the game ensured that he is well remembered by folk at the port.

Footnotes

1.  The South Fremantle Story volume 2 by Frank Harrison and Jack Lee, page 198. Return to Main Text

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Bruce Campbell (Subiaco, Carlton, Fitzroy, Melbourne)

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Bruce Campbell was a brilliant, high marking forward who was among a swathe of players to debut with Subiaco in 1908.  He went on to play a total of 93 senior games for the club, culminating in the 3.3 (21) to 2.7 (19) defeat of Perth in the 1915 premiership decider.  Campbell also played in the Maroons' 1913 premiership team.  In 1911 he ventured to Victoria where he played 3 games for Carlton before crossing to Fitzroy during the same season.  He was the Roys' top goal kicker with 25 goals that year, and continued briefly with the club in 1912.  He played a total of 15 league games with Fitzroy, and later had another brief VFL spell with Melbourne where he played 5 games and booted 4 goals in 1920.

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Garnet Campbell (Essendon & Sandringham)

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A dashing centreline player who handled the ball well, and almost invariably used it effectively, Garnet played 157 VFL games for Essendon between 1923 and 1933.  After initially struggling to break into the Dons' powerful line-up on a regular basis, he developed into a top ranking player who represented the VFL on a number of occasions, including  the 1927 Melbourne carnival.  In his last three seasons at the club he served as captain-coach, but after two promising seasons the side plummeted to a rare wooden spoon in 1933, and the following season saw him employed in a similar capacity at VFA side Sandringham, where he spent the final two years of his senior career.

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Graham Campbell (Fitzroy, West Perth, Glenelg)

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As a player, Graham Campbell was energetic, tough and canny, with a keen goal sense.  Between 1956 and 1964 he played a total of 151 VFL games for Fitzroy, kicking 154 goals.  He won the club's best and fairest award in 1957, and was a prime reason for the side's emergence as a genuine force in the late fifties and early sixties.  In 1960, the 'Roys reached a rare preliminary final, but despite Campbell's near best afield performance, they went under to Collingwood by 5 points.  Besides his best and fairest award, the highlights of Campbell's playing career were probably his selection to represent the VFL, and his membership of Fitzroy's 1959 night premiership side.  

As a coach, Campbell's greatest achievement was steering West Perth to the 1975 WANFL premiership thanks to a 23.17 (155) to 7.9 (51) grand final annihilation of South Fremantle.  Two weeks earlier, in the 2nd semi final, the Cardinals had achieved similar supremacy over Swan Districts, winning 20.22 (142) to 8.16 (64).  This gave them an average winning margin in two finals of 91 points, an achievement unequalled in the history of football in the three major states.  Campbell coached West Perth from 1975 to 1978, getting the side into the finals each year.  In 1978 he returned to his old club Fitzroy, where he had coached on a caretaker basis for a few games in 1974, as senior coach.  However, although the Lions scored a noteworthy victory over North Melbourne in the night grand final, their premiership form was unimpressive, and at the end of the year Campbell was replaced as coach by Bill Stephen.  In 1983 he returned to league coaching with Glenelg, where he spent two seasons.  He later worked in the meia.

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Grant Campbell (East Perth)

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Grant Campbell was a shining light for East Perth over the course of what developed into an almost uniquely dreary period for the club.  He joined the Royals from Dianella, and made the first of an eventual 208 league appearances in 1978, the year East Perth downed Perth by 2 points in one of the most memorable of all grand finals, played in monsoon conditions (reviewed here).  Campbell, who had not yet done enough in the selectors' eyes to warrant regular selection, did not take part in that match, and when he retired eleven seasons later it would be without a senior premiership to his name.

He achieved virtually everything else on offer, however.   A tall, powerful figure with more than adequate skill, he sometimes lacked consistency, but at his best was one of the most imposing and effective key position players in the state.  He played most of his football at centre half forward, but towards the end of his career he developed into a fine centre half back.  Winner of the Royals' fairest and best award in 1984, he was actively courted by a number of VFL clubs, and in fact was drafted by St Kilda, but he elected to remain in the west.  Not really what you would call an out and out goal kicking forward - his game was much too varied and adaptable for that - he nevertheless topped East Perth's goal kicking list three times, and booted a total of 320 goals in his league career.  He represented Western Australia 5 times in the interstate arena, kicking 1 goal.

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Hugh Campbell (North Fremantle, South Fremantle, East Perth)

 

If today he tends to be best remembered for his remarkable feat in kicking 23 goals for Western Australia against Queensland at the 1924 Hobart carnival, Hugh 'Bonny' Campbell actually achieved considerably more than that in a 188 game league career with three clubs.

That career commenced at North Fremantle, where he played 12 games, but when that club went into mothballs at the end of the 1915 season he transferred to South Fremantle.  His acquisition by South helped transform the club from pretenders to genuine premiership contenders, and in that year's challenge final against East Fremantle, 'Bonny' Campbell made a telling contribution on a half back flank as the southerners registered their first ever flag with a convincing 19 point win.  A year later, again on a half back flank, Campbell was similarly conspicuous as South backed up with another comfortable win over their arch rivals.

Despite his success on the half back line, 'Bonny' Campbell was convinced that he could serve the club better as a full forward.  Once given a chance to prove himself, he never looked back: in 1921 he was at the goalfront for the state side as it defeated both the VFL and South Australia to claim the Australian championship; the following year he both captained his club, and topped the league goal kicking list with 42 goals.  Quick on the lead, strong overhead, and a deadly accurate shot for goal, whether from a set position or on the run, he was arguably the first truly great goalsneak in West Australian football.

In 1923, Campbell requested a clearance to East Perth, and when this was refused opted to stand out of the game for a year in order to get his way, rather than continue with the southerners.  He resumed in 1924 as good as ever, performing superbly at the Hobart carnival with 51 goals in 5 games (see footnote 1), and topping the league's list of goal kickers for a second time.  He was at full forward in East Perth's grand final winning teams of 1926 and '27, and topped the WAFL goal kicking list in both of those years as well.  All told, he managed 630 goals in his 188 league games, a total that appears all the more creditable when you consider that he played much of his early football as a defender.

In later years, full forwards like George Doig, Bernie Naylor and Austin Robertson junior repeatedly set new standards of goal kicking excellence in Western Australian football, but there is a sense in which Hugh 'Bonny' Campbell was the template on which all of them were based.  His importance in the history of the game was recognised in June 2006 with his inclusion, at full forward, in East Perth's official 'Team of the Century 1906 to 1944'.

Footnotes

1.  Campbell began quietly with 3 goals against South Australia, but came alive against the VFL in Western Australia's second match, booting 8.  Then came the record-breaking tally of 23 against the hapless Queenslanders, followed by bags of 7 and 10 against Tasmania and New South Wales respectively.  Return to Main Text

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Wayne Campbell (Richmond)

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One of the Richmond Football Club's true all time greats, Wayne Campbell joined the Tigers from Bendigo League side Golden Square, and made his AFL debut in 1991.  Energetic, purposeful and highly skilled, he quickly developed into a key player whose passion for the game was obvious.  The 1995 season saw him win the first of four club best and fairest awards, earn AFL All Australian selection, and make his Victorian state of origin debut.  It was a good season for the Tigers, too, as they qualified for the finals for the first time since 1982, eventually running 4th.  An inspirational, hard running player who never accepted defeat, Campbell continued to produce outstanding football throughout the 1990s, and was rewarded with a second selection as an AFL All Australian in 1999.  He assumed the Richmond captaincy in 2001, having earlier held the role on a temporary basis in 1997 when regular skipper Matthew Knights was injured.  Matthew Campbell announced his retirement at the end of the 2005 season having played a total of 264 AFL games and kicked 146 goals.  

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Ken Caporn (Claremont)

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Ken Caporn began his Claremont career in 1943, when the WANFL was operating as an under-age competition only.  He went on to play a total of 273 games for the club before hanging up his boots at the end of the 1958 season.  He also played a dozen interstate matches for Western Australia.

Powerful, tenacious and extraordinarily fit, Caporn played as a ruckman for many years before developing into one of the finest post-war full backs in West Australian football, and arguably the best ever to take the field for the Monts, winning the club's fairest and best trophy in 1951 and 1954.  By the latter years of his career he had developed his physique to Herculean proportions, and was rewarded by his team mates with the nickname 'Moose' - with painful consequences for one of his team mates, diminutive rover Bruce Sinclair:

Late in one match, Bruce was running back to take a mark on the guidance of one of his team mates' call of "Yours Bruce!"  Unfortunately the call was really "Yours Moose!"  The result of this small breakdown in communication was a somewhat large breakdown in Bruce's capacity to play for the rest of the game.  When he came to some time later he expressed the opinion that Ken's nickname might be changed for the general health of his team mates.  (See footnote 1)

Despite playing alongside such high quality footballers as Les McClements, Bill O'Neill and 'Sonny' Maffina for much of his career, Ken Caporn never experienced the satisfaction of playing in a premiership team, or indeed even went close to so doing.

Footnotes

1.  The Tigers' Tale by Kevin Casey, page 84.  Return to Main Text

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Harry Carbon (South Fremantle & Claremont)

 

Nicknamed 'Hobart Harry' following his sensational, match-winning performance for Western Australia against the VFL at the 1947 Hobart carnival, Harry Carbon was a dynamic, exquisitely two-sided, hyper-aggressive rover well versed in a multitude of techniques for unsettling opposition players.  During South Fremantle's halcyon post-war era he combined with fellow rover Steve Marsh to provide unequalled strength around the packs, coupled with a formidable extra goal kicking option when resting in a forward pocket.  

A member of three red and white premiership teams, Carbon was skipper in 1952 when South overcame West Perth by 21 points in the grand final after trailing by 5 goals at half time.  He played 141 league games for South, plus 9 state games for Western Australia, for whom his performance in knee deep Hobart mud in just one of them was sufficient to earn him a unique and enduring place in football folk lore.  Legend has it that during that remarkable display against the Big V the opposition defenders were becoming increasingly frustrated at Carbon's brilliance, and began, with a minimum of subtlety and subterfuge, to 'line him up'.  "Take your time fellas," was the diminutive Carbon's cheeky retort, "you'll all get a turn!"

It was largely on the basis of his reputation for arrogant toughness that Carbon was hired as coach by Claremont in 1954.  It was hoped that he would manage to inject some steel into a team with a reputation for flaccidity, but in the event all Carbon managed in his sole season in charge was to maneuver the side one place up the premiership ladder, from 7th to 6th.  Toughness and courage can neither be bought or taught it seems; you either possess them, or you don't.  South Fremantle's 'Hobart Harry' possessed both in abundance.

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Ray Card (Geelong)

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Recruited from Morwell, Geelong's Ray 'Swap' Card was one of the best negating footballers of his generation.  Tough, resolute and durable, he was renowned for his ability to keep the opposing team's best attacking players quiet.  Most of his 110 VFL games between 1977 and 1987 were played on a half back flank, but later in his career he also added an attacking dimension to his game which enabled him to perform effectively in other positions.  He won the Cats' best and fairest award in 1983. 

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Peter Carey (Glenelg)

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Glenelg hero Peter 'Super' Carey enjoyed a long and varied career which saw him amass a South Australian record 448 league games between 1971 and 1988.  He also played 19 games for South Australia, achieving All Australian selection after both the 1979 and 1980 state of origin carnivals.  Strongly built and extremely adept overhead, he played much of his early football at centre half forward, in which position he starred with 6 goals in the famous 1973 grand final win over North Adelaide.  Twelve years later, when the Bays next went top, Carey was there again, this time as a veritable man mountain of a ruckman whose ability to give his smaller team mates first use of the ball was unrivalled.  Glenelg beat North Adelaide in the 1985 grand final, and when they did so the following year Peter Carey was many observers' choice as best afield.

A best and fairest with the Tigers in 1975, 1979 and 1981, Carey also topped the club's goal kicking ladder in 1973 with 70 goals.  Mainly as a result of his exploits as a centre half forward during the early 1970s, he amassed the highly creditable career total of 521 league goals.  Bays captain from 1983 until his retirement, he also enjoyed the distinction, in 1981, of landing the first ever Fos Williams Medal.  A Glenelg man through and through, Peter Carey later served as a member of the club board.  It almost goes without saying that when, in 2002, Glenelg implemented its own official 'Hall of Fame', Peter Carey was selected as an inaugural member.

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Wayne Carey (North Melbourne & Adelaide)

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When Wayne Carey's career controversially stalled prior to the start of the 2002 season he had established a reputation, not only as one of the finest footballers of his era, but as, quite incontrovertibly, one of perhaps the dozen greatest players of all time.

Hailing originally from Wagga Wagga, Carey played junior football with North Adelaide before joining North Melbourne in 1989.  It was clear right from the outset that the Kangaroos had managed to get their hands on someone special.  Powerfully built even then, Carey could mark strongly even under the most extreme pressure, and his kicking either to position or at goal was impeccable.  He was also surprisingly quick, both over the ground, and in terms of his decision making and use of the ball.

Carey won the first of his four North Melbourne best and fairest awards in 1992, and the following year was appointed captain.  North's emergence as one of the power clubs of the AFL during the mid- to late 1990s was attributable in no small measure to Carey's presence and contribution.  It is arguable that no footballer in history has ever been capable of winning a game entirely off his own boot, but Carey at his peak perhaps came as close as anyone.  On a purely objective measure, he was probably worth at least three players - which, coincidentally, is sometimes the number of opponents he had to contend with.

Named an AFL All Australian in 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999 and 2000, Carey was selected as captain of the side on 4 occasions.  In both 1996 and 1999 he was a pivotal member of his club's two most recent premiership sides.

For personal reasons, Carey elected to stand out of football in 2002, but the 2003 season brought his return to a game which his absence had left the poorer when he fronted up with Adelaide.

After just a season and a half with the Crows, however, Carey was forced to retire from football owing to a persistent neck injury.

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William Carkeek (Richmond & Essendon)

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Bill Carkeek was a useful rover and crumbing forward (to use today's terminology) who spent most of his career in the VFA with Richmond.  In 1903 he joined Essendon where he played 23 VFL games and kicked 8 goals in just over two seasons.  In 1905 he returned to Richmond and was a key contributor from a half forward flank as the side convincingly defeated minor premier North Melbourne in both the final and challenge final to secure a second VFA pennant.  Carkeek had also been a regular member of the Richmond team that won the 1902 flag which was based on ladder positions at the conclusion of the home and away matches.

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Darren Carlson (Southport, Brisbane, West Adelaide)

by Murray Bird and Peter Blucher

A persistent wingman from Surfers Paradise via Southport , Darren Carlson was a triple QAFL premiership player (1985-7-9) and played 25 VFL games with the Brisbane Bears from 1987 to 1990. He joined West Adelaide in 1991, winning selection in 'The Advertiser' Team of the Year.  Carson, who played 10 times for Queensland, later became an assistant coach with the Queensland Scorpions under 18s.

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Phil Carman (Norwood, Collingwood, Melbourne, Essendon, North Melbourne, Eastlake)

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Phil Carman's playing career was laced with controversy from the start.  In 1970 he joined Norwood from Edenhope, which was zoned to VFL club Collingwood, and although the ANFC initially approved the arrangement it later rescinded his permit to play after the Magpies appealed.  An interstate, inter-club tug-of-war then ensued, which eventually saw Carman cleared to continue his career with the Redlegs.  He played a total of 58 games for the club, as well as representing South Australia, and earned a reputation as a dynamic, audaciously skilled, occasionally fiery performer.  Collingwood kept close tabs on his progress, and when he finally decided to give the VFL a try at the end of the 1974 season it was the Magpies who procured his signature.  His stupendous form over the first two-thirds of the 1975 season made him just about the league's most newsworthy property.  Had injury not intervened to bring his season to a premature end, there seems little doubt that he would have won the Brownlow.  As it was, he finished with 17 votes, just 3 adrift of winner Gary Dempsey.  Hardly surprisingly, he won the Copeland Trophy, Collingwood's best and fairest award.

Although he intermittently continued to play some fine football, a combination of injuries and regular visits to the Tribunal ensured that he never quite recaptured the consistent brilliance of his debut season in the VFL.  In 1977, he incurred a suspension for striking Hawthorn's Michael Tuck in the 2nd semi final, and was ruled out of both the grand final and the grand final replay against North Melbourne.  To this day, Collingwood fans remain adamant that his enforced absence cost their team the flag.

In 1979, after 66 games and 142 goals for the 'Pies, 'Fabulous Phil' crossed to Melbourne, where he added another 11 games and 23 goals.  A two season stint at Essendon followed, but a 20 week suspension, imposed after he was found guilty of head-butting a boundary umpire, restricted him to just 10 appearances and 11 goals.  Carman finished his VFL career with North Melbourne where he played 13 games and booted 27 goals in 1982.  He then played briefly for Eastlake in the ACTAFL, followed by a succession of country clubs, before retiring.

Phil Carman returned to top level football in 1995 as coach of Sturt.  In seven seasons at the helm he helped elevate the club from perennial wooden spooner to regular finals contender, although a losing grand final against Port Adelaide Magpies in 1998 was the closest the Blues came to a flag.

There can be little doubt that Phil Carman possessed enough raw talent to have become one of the all time greats of the game.  As it was, however, owing to a mixture of ill discipline and bad luck, he ended up as one of the many footballers whose final report card read 'could have done better'.

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Syd Carman (Essendon)

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Syd Carman joined Essendon from a local church competition in 1926 and, after playing initially as a rover, developed into one of the finest centremen in the VFL.  Highly skilled, dashing, and boasting tremendous anticipation, he won the Dons' most improved player trophy in 1929, and the best and fairest award three years later.  The 1932 season also brought selection for Carman in a VFL interstate team, and a moment of controversy during a home and away match when he was struck in the back by a large stone hurled by a member of the crowd.

Appointed Essendon vice-captain in 1933, Syd Carman bowed out of VFL football at the end of the year after a total of 96 VFL games over the course of eight seasons.  He later served as Essendon club treasurer for twenty-two years as well as intermittently occupying a number of other off-field roles at the club until the end of the 1963 season.

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Jack Carmody (Collingwood & Hawthorn)

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Pugnacious and feisty, but also superbly balanced and a wonderful kick, Jack Carmody was an important player for Collingwood in in 94 games between 1933 and 1939, which included the winning grand finals of 1935-6.  Carmody's aggressive style of play was ideally suited to finals football, and he starred on a wing in both of the premiership teams in which he played.

After struggling to maintain his place in the team during the last couple of years of his time at Victoria Park, Carmody crossed to Hawthorn in 1940 where his career underwent something of a renaissance.  Between 1940 and 1944 and in 1946 he added another 64 VFL games to his tally, and was captain of the side in 1942.  As he slowed down he played a fair amount of football on the forward lines, with some success.

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Jack Carney (Geelong & Carlton)

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Originally from Colac, Jack Carney was recruited by Geelong in 1930 and made his VFL debut in the opening round of that season against North Melbourne.  At just 160cm in height and 54kg he remains the smallest player ever to represent the Cats at senior level, and indeed was one of the most diminutive men ever to play VFL football, allegedly wearing size three boots.  His small stature earned him the nickname of 'Mickey Mouse', and would undoubtedly have been a severe handicap were it not for his boundless courage and superb turn of speed, especially over that vital first five metres or so.  Carney played a total of 79 senior games for Geelong, including the winning grand final of 1931 against Richmond, when he had 26 telling disposals from centre wing to be one of the most damaging players on view.  He crossed to Carlton in 1936, and went on to add a further 84 VFL games to his tally over the ensuing half a dozen seasons.  In 1938 he had the satisfaction of playing in a second premiership team when he was on a wing in the Blues' 15 point grand final defeat of Collingwood.  A regular interstate representative, Jack Carney later served as a Carlton committee man.

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Fred Carpenter (South Melbourne, Williamstown, Port Melbourne)

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Fred Carpenter was a highly accomplished small man who gave fine service to South Melbourne on either side of World War One.  He joined the southerners from North Melbourne Juniors, and made his VFL debut in 1910.  A rover with a keen eye for goal, he played a total of 52 games and booted 68 goals over the course of a league career that ended in 1920, but which only actually involved six full seasons of play.  After leaving South he crossed to VFA club Williamstown, topping that club's goal kicking list in 1923 with 63 goals and in 1924 with 35.  In the latter season he served as the Seagulls' captain-coach and guided them to 2nd place behind a very strong Footscray combination.  The 1925 season saw Fred Carpenter on the move to Port Melbourne, where he was appointed non-playing coach.  In 1926 he assumed the captaincy reins as well, steering the side to 3rd place.  He stood down from both leadership roles but continued as a player with the club for several more years, amassing a total of 78 games.

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'Barney' Carr (Prahran & St Kilda)

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Carr was a classy and extremely effective centreman who played briefly for Prahran before joining St Kilda in 1921.  His use of the ball was impeccable, and he was universally regarded as one of the finest players of his era.  He played 130 VFL games for the Saints between 1921 and 1929, and was a VFL representative player on 9 occasions.  Club best and fairest awards were only intermittently awarded at St Kilda during the 1920s, but Carr won one in his second season.  He also captained the Saints briefly in 1925.

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Dennis Carroll (Sydney)

 

Noted for his skill, determination, strong marking and superb field kicking with either foot Dennis Carroll overcame the severe handicap of a rugby league background to become one of the finest Sydney players of the 1980s.  Skipper of the club for seven seasons, he was adept in a variety of positions, and an extremely consistent performer in more than 200 League games.  He also played 'state of origin' football for both Victoria and his home state.

Dennis Carroll's father Laurie and uncle Tom were also league footballers with St Kilda and Carlton respectively.  As a youngster Dennis spent many hours practising his kicking with his uncle whose insistence that his nephew learn to use both feet would reap significant dividends later when Carroll became arguably the finest kick in the VFL.

In August 2003, Dennis Carroll was selected on a half back flank in Sydney/South Melbourne's official 'Team of the Twentieth Century'.

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Merv Carrott (East Fremantle)

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On a half back flank, and one of East Fremantle's best players, in the 1979 grand final win over local rivals South Fremantle, Merv Carrott played 88 senior games for the club between 1975 and 1982.  Fairly tall and thinly built at 183cm and 70.5kg, he was reliable and consistent, if somewhat unobtrusive.

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Bruce Carter (City-Launceston, North Launceston, Mersey, Cananore)

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Although his direct, active involvement in football came almost exclusively during an era when the role of coach, indeed the nature of coaching itself, had yet to be clearly defined, Bruce Carter's achievement in masterminding 9 senior premierships in just eleven seasons lends considerable credence to the claim of many old timers that he was the greatest Tasmanian football coach ever.

Carter's football journey began in Launceston in 1903 when he played for City before moving to local rivals North Launceston the following year as vice-captain and coach.  Straight away, he proved he was an excellent leader of men by steering his charges to 3 consecutive flags.  In 1908 he joined Mersey on Tasmania's north west coast and, this time combining the off field function of coach with on field captaincy, was again successful in annexing the premiership.  That same year also saw him represent Tasmania at the inaugural interstate carnival in Melbourne where the Apple Islanders finished top of B Division and Carter was awarded the Bibby Trophy as Tasmania's outstanding player.

Upon moving to Cananore in 1909 Carter was responsible for overseeing a quite unprecedented sequence of 3 successive TFL and state flags.  The run was interrupted in 1912 when he resumed the coaching reins at North Launceston where, although successful at local level, he was unable to steer his charges past Lefroy in the state grand final.

Bruce Carter was back at Cananore the following year and once again he gave the club's supporters what they wanted at both TFL and state level.

It is worth pointing out that all of Carter's coaching achievements came about while he was a player, and that, to a very large extent, his input as a player contributed to those achievements.  In 1914, for example - his final year as a playing coach - he was widely considered the best player afield in Cananore's losing grand final against North Hobart

After a prolonged period in the 'outer' Carter returned to coaching with Cananore, this time in a non-playing capacity, for one season in 1937, but by this time the game had moved on considerably and he was only able to impel his charges to a single win all year.  It was an unfortunate and depressing finale, but Bruce Carter deserves to be remembered not for this, but for his unparalleled achievements of a quarter of a century earlier.

In 2005, Carter was an inaugural inductee as a coaching legend in Tasmanian Football's official Hall of Fame.

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Harold Carter (Fitzroy & Carlton)

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Originally from South Bendigo, Harold Carter was a diminutive (165cm, 62 kg) but highly effective rover who was one of Fitzroy's best in its losing challenge final against Essendon in 1923.  He played 38 VFL games and booted 34 goals  for the Roys between 1920 and 1923, and in 1924 sought pastures new at Carlton.  Over the final five seasons of his league career he added another 63 games and 54 goals to his tally. 

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Noel Carter (Ulverstone, Richmond, South Fremantle)

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Tasmanian rover Noel Carter played top level football in three states, beginning with Ulverstone in the NWFU, whose best and fairest award he won in 1972.  The following season saw Carter venture across the Bass Strait to the 'big time' of the VFL and one of the bona fide 'power' clubs of the era in Richmond.  Over the course of the next five seasons, Carter played 49 games for the Tigers, including the 1973 grand final win over Carlton.

The final, and by far the most auspicious, phase of Carter's career was spent with South Fremantle where he earned a reputation as one of the most inspirational on-field leaders in the game.  Tough, hard at the ball, and almost fanatically determined, he led from the front as the Bulldogs established themselves as one of the leading sides in the WANFL, and indeed Australia.  Between 1979 and 1981 Carter captained South to three successive grand finals which produced a loss against East Fremantle, a comfortable win over Swan Districts (reviewed here), and, finally, an atrocious display of kicking for goal, which effectively handed the 1981 premiership to Claremont on a plate.  Carter, who was high among his team's best players in each match, could certainly not be blamed for the losses, and his high reputation was further enhanced with club best and fairest awards in 1980 and 1984.

In nine seasons at South Fremantle, Noel Carter played a total of 155 league games, besides representing both Western Australia and Tasmania in the interstate arena.

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Rod Carter (Fitzroy, Port Melbourne, South Melbourne/Sydney)

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Originally from Banyule, Rod Carter was a tough, mean defender who showed intermittent promise during a 76 game stint with Fitzroy between 1974 and 1979, but who really came into his own when he moved to South Melbourne in 1980.  In between he played 10 VFA games for Port Melbourne.  During the course of eleven seasons with the Swans, who moved to Sydney in 1982, Carter played 217 league games and established a reputation as probably the hardest full back in the competition to kick goals against.  His staunchly defensive approach is evidenced by the fact that, in 293 senior games, he only booted 1 goal.

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Geoff Case (Melbourne)

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Classy and tough, Geoff Case could perform with equal proficiency at either half forward or half back, and his 122 VFL games for Melbourne included the 1957, 1959 and 1960 winning grand finals.  He also represented the VFL, but retired from the game while still at his peak, aged just twenty-six.

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Colin Casey (Sturt)

 

Recruited by Sturt from West Broken Hill, where he had played a couple of senior seasons, Colin Casey made his league debut in 1971 as a nineteen year old and made an immediate impact.  Playing mainly at full back he was selected in that position in the prestigious 'Advertiser Team of the Year', a rare achievement for a first year player.  Solidly built at 191cm and 89kg Casey was capable of holding down any key position, but spent most of his thirteen season, 251 game Sturt career on the last line of defence.  A state representative 5 times, he won the Blues' best and fairest award in 1972, and played in two premiership teams. 

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Richard Casey (Brunswick, South Melbourne, Footscray, City-Launceston)

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At 168cm in height and under 10kg in weight, Richard Casey was built more like a jockey than a league footballer.  Nevertheless, he was an excellent player, and, perhaps out of a exaggerated desire to compensate for his diminutive stature, an excessively combative one.  Indeed, so wantonly aggressive was Casey that he ran foul of the authorities on more than one occasion (he was once suspended for half a season), as well as raising the ire of the normally conservative football writers of the day.  

Originally from Brunswick, Casey joined South Melbourne in 1905 and went on to play the majority of his senior career there.  His biggest disappointment was almost certainly missing the 1909 grand final, in which South defeated Carlton, because of injury.  

Casey left South Melbourne in 1912 after 112 league games.  He later played briefly with Footscray and Launceston club City.  In 1919, he was one of many thousands to die during that year's global influenza epidemic.

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Terry Cashion (New Town, South Melbourne, Clarence, Longford, Sandy Bay)

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Much travelled rover Terry Cashion seems destined to remain the only Tasmanian ever to win interstate football's most noteworthy individual prize, the Tassie Medal.  After preferring soccer as a youngster, Cashion saw the light as a thirteen year old when he began playing under age football with Buckingham.  After four seasons there he exploded onto the big league scene with New Town in 1939 when he finished runner up in the TFL's best and fairest award, the George Watt Memorial Medal, a feat he duplicated the following year.  During the war he spent some time stationed in Victoria with the army, and played a handful of VFL games with South Melbourne before being sidelined with a knee injury.  Cashion's next major port of call following his discharge from the army and recovery from his injured knee was Clarence, where he played for a couple of seasons, including the 'Roos first ever TFL season in 1947.  That year also saw Cashion donning a Tasmanian jumper for the first time, and his performances during the Hobart carnival were sufficiently meritorious for him to be awarded the Stancombe Trophy as Tasmania's most noteworthy performer of the series.

Three years later at the Brisbane carnival the by this stage seasoned performer, now with Longford, played even better, securing not only a second Stancombe Trophy, but the coveted Tassie Medal itself as well.  In a series marred by atrocious weather conditions, the Tasmanians as a whole performed with a considerable amount of credit, comfortably beating the VFA, and giving a respectable account of themselves against all three of the major football states.  Much of the credit for this belonged to Cashion, who positively revelled in the conditions, matching or outplaying all of his supposedly more illustrious opponents in every game.

Cashion again represented Tasmania at the Adelaide carnival of 1953 in what proved to be his interstate swansong.  Back in the TFL by this stage, with Sandy Bay, he retired from top level football at season's end with a total of 193 senior games under his belt.  An excellent indication of his consistency is his achievement in winning a total of seven club champion awards in only ten full seasons of senior football.

The immensity of Terry Cashion's reputation in Tasmanian football circles was emphasised in June 2004 with his selection as first rover in the state's official 'Team of the Century'.  Two years later he was inducted as a legend in the official Tasmanian Football Hall of Fame.

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Jack Cashman (Fitzroy, West Perth, Carlton, Yarraville, Cananore)

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Jack Cashman was a vigorous and highly effective ruckman/forward whose selfless approach to the game was much appreciated, and profited from, by his team mates.  He made his VFL debut with Fitzroy in 1926, and went on to play 75 games for the club over the next six seasons.  In 1932, in reverse of the usual trend at the time, he accepted the position of captain-coach of West Perth, where his inspirational leadership qualities, both on and off the field, reaped immediate reward in the form of a premiership.  Cashman also steered the Cardinals to third place the following year before accepting an invitation to take over the reins at his original club which had only just failed to make the finals the previous year.  Just two games into the 1934 season, however, Cashman walked out on the Roys, claiming that certain members of the committee were out to 'get' him.  He sought, and was eventually granted, a clearance to Carlton, and over the next year or so he gave fine service to his new club as a handy goal kicking option, adding 17 VFL games to give him a career total of 93.  He spent the latter part of the 1935 season with Yarraville, and was at centre half forward in the club's breakthrough premiership win that year.   He spent 1936 back in Western Australia, but in 1937 he was back in Melbourne where he served as captain-coach of a Yarraville side that finished fourth.  From 1938 until 1941 he captain-coached TANFL side Cananore, albeit without managing to procure a premiership.  Jack Cashman represented the VFL on 4 occasions.

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Tony Casserly (East Fremantle & Central District)

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Tony Casserly's senior football career began with East Fremantle where he played a total of 154 league games during the 1960s.  Playing as a ruck-rover he was one of Old Easts' best in the 1965 grand final defeat of Swan Districts.  He also represented Western Australia 10 times.  In 1970 he moved to South Australia and joined Central District where he would add another 101 league games plus a couple more state appearances, this time for South Australia, over the course of the next six seasons.

Tough, hard running and abundantly skilled, Casserly took over the coaching at Centrals from Trevor Stanton in 1971, and the coaching mantle from Dennis Jones a year later.  In the latter role he developed a fast, run-on style of play that enabled the Bulldogs to reach the preliminary final in 1972, but thereafter the wheels fell off somewhat, and the side was beset by inconsistency.  Nevertheless, Tony Casserly's impact at both Centrals and Old Easts was considerable, and he is remembered with admiration by supporters of both clubs.

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Jeff Cassidy (Geelong & East Fremantle)

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Jeff Cassidy was an abundantly talented utility whose career was cruelly undermined by injury.  Geelong recruited him from Cobram and he made his senior VFL debut midway through the 1974 season, impressing onlookers straight away with his crisp ball handling and superb disposal skills.  Unfortunately, he soon became beset by leg muscle problems which limited him to just 50 league appearances in six seasons, interspersed with a one season stint at East Fremantle in 1977.  In 1981, Cassidy returned to Old Easts to finish his career; he retired at the end of the 1984 season after 70 WAFL games, and having twice topped the club's goal kicking list.  However, overall his effectiveness and impact had been seriously undermined by persistent injury woes. 

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Jack Cassin (Essendon)

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A rugged and tenacious utility who played the game hard and not always fair, Jack Cassin was a noteworthy identity for many years at Essendon, despite sacrificing much of his potential football life to his service with the RAAF.  He joined the Dons in 1936, a few months short of his twenty-first birthday, having played previously with Wandin and Seville.  When he left Essendon to serve as captain-coach of Waranga North East Football Association side Euroa in 1948 he had played a total of 152 VFL games, and kicked 145 goals.   He also represented the VFL against South Australia in 1941.  Cassin was appointed captain-coach of the Bombers' reserves team in 1947, and spent the majority  of the season in that role.  However, when the senior side lost a large number of players through injury during the finals series he earned a surprise recall for the grand final clash with Carlton.  Playing in the first ruck alongside Perc Bushby and Bill Hutchison he performed serviceably, but could not prevent his team from going under to Carlton by the narrowest of margins.  Thankfully for Cassin, he had earlier enjoyed premiership success with the Dons in both 1942 and 1946.  A controversial figure at times, he was a renowned 'stirrer' of opposition players, and might be said to play his football according to the adage 'hit first and ask questions later'.  Not surprisingly, this approach sometimes attracted the ire of opposition supporters - on one occasion he was actually attacked on the field by an angry fan - and he was no stranger to the Tribunal either, making a total of 8 visits there during his career, and being found guilty 3 times.

After spending the 1948 season with Euroa, Cassin captain-coached Colac in 1949 and 1950, which were the club's first two seasons in the Hampden Football League.  His son John Cassin was later a fine league footballer with four different clubs.

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John Cassin (Essendon, West Torrens, North Melbourne, Fitzroy)

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John Cassin was a tough, reliable wingman and on baller who joined Essendon from Colac under the father-son rule, his father Jack having played for the club in the thirties and forties.  Between 1971 and 1974 he played a total of 51 VFL games for the Bombers and booted 32 goals.  He spent the 1975 and 1976 seasons with West Torrens, playing 34 SANFL games and kicking 35 goals, and captaining the club in his second season.  Crossing to North Melbourne in 1977 he enjoyed a fine season, culminating in the highlight of his career as he helped his new side to a 21.25 (151) to 19.10 (124) replayed grand final win over Collingwood.  Cassin went on to play 78 senior games and kick 83 goals in four and a half years with the Kangas before transferring to Fitzroy midway through the 1981 season.  He remained with the Lions until the end of the 1982 season, but only played another 5 league games without kicking a goal.

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Fred Castledine (Swan Districts)

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A powerful and versatile footballer, and a thoroughly dedicated clubman, Fred Castledine was a pivotal figure at Swan Districts for over a decade.  He made his league debut in 1958, and had played a total of 162 games and kicked 44 goals by the time of his retirement in 1969.  During his career he would undoubtedly have experienced the full gamut of human emotion, as he began and ended it in teams that endured perennial flirtation with the wooden spoon, while between 1961 and 1965 he played in arguably the greatest sides in the club's history.  When Swans beat East Perth in the 1961 grand final to record their first ever senior premiership Fred Castledine played a key, if largely unheralded role, for it was he who willingly sacrificed his own game in order to curtail the impact of the Royals' champion ruckman Graham 'Polly' Farmer.  With Farmer embroiled in a continual series of physical tussles with Castledine, eventual Simpson Medallist Keith Slater was left free to win the lion's share of the hit-outs.

Castledine went on to play in Swans' 1962 and 1963 flag triumphs, with his performance at centre half back in the 1963 grand final defeat of East Fremantle being particularly noteworthy.  From 1965 until 1967 he captain-coached the side, steering it as far as a losing grand final in his first year, only to see its fortunes dip markedly in the ensuing seasons. 

Fred Castledine's 4 interstate games for Western Australia emphasised his versatility as he was selected in a different position (follower, centre half forward, centre half back and 19th man) in each of them.  However, he arguably played his best football either as a key position defender or a negating ruckman, and there would have been few surprises when he was selected as centre half back in Swan Districts' official 'Team of the Century'.

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Kevin Caton (Darwin, Swan Districts, West Coast, Fitzroy, Brisbane)

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Kevin Caton began his senior football career with Darwin, playing on the wing in that club's losing 1983-84 grand final side.  In 1984 he joined Swan Districts, which at the time was one of the strongest club sides in Australia, having won both of the previous two WAFL premierships convincingly.  Coached by former South Fremantle champion John Todd, Swans played an ebullient, aggressive, attacking style of football to which Caton, "a tall and talented wingman or half forward who has patches of brilliance and can be a match winner on his day" (see footnote 1), was soon making a significant contribution.  When the club went 'three in a row' in 1984, Caton was a member of the team which overran East Fremantle in the grand final.  The following season he represented Western Australia against South Australia at Subiaco.

Caton continued to give Swan Districts strong service over the next couple of seasons. In 1987 he topped the club's goal kicking list with 47 goals, and at the end of the year was drafted by West Coast.  Unfortunately for Caton, the Eagles were blessed with a proliferation of players of his type - medium sized speedsters with good all round skills - and he managed just a single game for the season.  In 1989, he found himself at Fitzroy, where he managed another 9 senior games, before being traded to Brisbane the following season for the last 8 games of his AFL career.

Returning to Swan Districts in 1992 he performed strongly, gaining selection in the Western Australian state league team which lost narrowly to South Australia at Football Park, and topping the WAFL goal kicking list with 51 majors for the year.  He carried on with Swans for another couple of seasons, taking his final career total of WAFL games to 118.

Footnotes

1.  Who's Who in Western Australian Football 1986, page 28.  Return to Main Text

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Arnold Caust (South Adelaide)

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Arnold Caust was a noteworthy performer for South Adelaide during the first half of the 1920s, a time when the club was fairly competitive without ever quite boasting premiership credentials.  Strong in the air, and mobile, Caust played most of his football as a follower resting across half forward.  He was a highly respected figure at South, and captained the club in 1923 (to 3rd) and 1924 (4th).  As there was no coach at the club at the time, Caust was responsible for overseeing training, as well as for leading the team every Saturday.  In the five seasons from 1920 to 1924 he played a total of 53 league games and booted 25 goals for South.  He also represented South Australia 8 times, kicking 7 goals.

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Roy Cazaly (St Kilda, South Melbourne, City, Preston, North Hobart, New Town, Camberwell, Hawthorn)

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To some extent, Roy Cazaly's name - used as a battle cry by Australian troops during the second World War - is almost synonymous with the sport of Australian football.  It is somewhat ironic therefore that he was remembered for his time at St Kilda (where he played 99 games between 1910 and 1920) as "just another footballer", only eking out a reputation as a 'superstar' when he joined South Melbourne in 1921.  While at South he added another 99 senior games, made his Big V debut (going on to play 13 times), topped the club goalkicking list on two occasions, and won the best and fairest award in 1926.  Less tangibly, he established a reputation as Victorian football's foremost aerialist, giving rise to the time-honoured catch cry - first coined by team mate Fred Fleiter - 'Up there Cazaly!'

Cazaly was more than just a brilliant aerialist, however.  A non-smoking teetotaller, he was ahead of his time as far as fitness went, and he combined superb physical conditioning with an acute football brain.  The former enabled him to play well over 400 senior games in Victoria and Tasmania, while the latter was on eminent display during a highly successful 7 premiership coaching career.

Additional details about Roy Cazaly's career can be found in the entries on South Launceston, St Kilda, Sydney and Glenorchy, as well as at Ross Smith's excellent website at http://au.geocities.com/sportandhistory/football.html.

In 2005, Cazaly was named as an inaugural coaching legend in Tasmanian Football's official Hall of Fame.

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Albert Chadwick (Prahran, Melbourne, Hawthorn)

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Rugged, dashing and an inspirational leader, Bert Chadwick was one of the dominant football figures of the 1920s.  He began his career with Prahran, where he impressed greatly as a ruckman-forward, but it was not until he wrote personally to Melbourne requesting a try-out that any of the VFL clubs showed an interest.  Immediately realising that here was an uncut gem, the Fuchsias signed the 22 year old straight away, and he made his debut for them in 1920.  So eye-catching were his early performances that he was chosen in the VFL state side that same year.

For most of his Melbourne career, Chadwick played at centre half back, in which position he also served the Big V with distinction for most of his 19 appearances.  In 1924 he was appointed Melbourne skipper, and was vice-captain of the victorious VFL combination at the Hobart carnival.  A natural leader, he knew how to encourage and bring out the best in his team mates, whilst simultaneously affording a copybook example of how the game should be played.  When the VFL introduced a best and fairest award, the Brownlow Medal, in 1924, Bert Chadwick finished runner-up to 'Carji' Greeves of Geelong.

In 1925, Chadwick took on the role of captain-coach, and promptly led his side to its first finals appearance since 1915, and only its second since winning the premiership in 1900.  The Fuchsias ran 3rd that year, but the following season, after finishing the home and away rounds in 3rd place, they overcame minor premier Collingwood twice to claim an unexpected but needless to say enormously gratifying flag.  

In 1929, Chadwick crossed to Hawthorn as captain-coach, steering the side to 10th place which, quite remarkably, was its highest finish since entering the VFL four years earlier.  He retired at the end of the season after 159 VFL games.

Bert Chadwick later served as chairman of the Melbourne Football Club, and president of the Melbourne Football Club.  He was also a highly successful businessman, and was knighted in 1974.

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Derek Chadwick (East Perth)

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Ask any footballer worth his salt what his single greatest ambition in the game is and he will likely reply, "To play in a premiership team".  Doubtless that ambition held true of former East Perth great Derek Chadwick who, in the fourteen seasons between 1959 and 1972, played a record 269 games for a club that failed to contest the finals on only three occasions during that time.  In the other eleven seasons, the Royals reached the grand final no fewer than nine times, but were successful only twice, in 1959, when eighteen year old Chadwick missed selection, and in 1972, a couple of months after his retirement.  All of which makes the supremely talented Chadwick arguably one of the most unfortunate players in the history of the game, and given the fact that he was also intensely competitive - he was notorious for approaching even an ostensibly casual kick to kick session as if it was the last quarter of a grand final - this must have hurt like mad.

Playing mainly on the wing, Derek Chadwick was in many ways a prototype of the sort of wingman who was to come - tough, tenacious, physically strong and ultra aggressive, much less a Warne-Smith or a 'Pops' Heal than a Schimmelbusch, an Ayres, or even a pint-sized Dipierdomenico.  In interstate matches against the VFL and South Australia he was consistently good, and often brilliant, and when the finals came around it was certainly not Chadwick's fault when, as invariably happened in the end, the Royals got beaten.

While his style of play was probably not designed to attract Sandover votes - although he did run third behind Barry Cable and Mel Whinnen in 1964 - his importance to his club was twice recognised with fairest and best awards, while he earned a Simpson Medal in 1964 after two blistering displays for Western Australia in Melbourne and Adelaide.  In June 2006 he was chosen in his favoured wing position in East Perth's official 'Team of the Century 1945 to 2005'.

Aside from his football ability, Derek Chadwick was also an extremely accomplished cricketer, making numerous Sheffield Shield appearances for Western Australia, but never quite managing to break into the Australian Test team.

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Newton Chandler (Carlton)

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Although he only played a total of 69 senior games, Newton Chandler's name is, in some respects, synonymous with that of the club he represented, Carlton.  He began with the Blues in 1919, and was selected to represent the VFL in his second season.  Dashing and clever, he played for most of his six season league career as a wingman, where his predilection for setting off on long, weaving runs often came to the fore.  After his playing career was over he served the club in numerous off field capacities, including secretary, vice-president and treasurer.  When he died in 1997 he was 103 years of age.

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Vic Chanter (Fitzroy)

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A full back of the old school, Vic Chanter was tough, ruthless and relentless, caring little if he finished a match with no disposals to his name as long as his opponent did likewise.  Chanter actually began his career with Melbourne, prior to world War Two, but never played a senior game.  He did, however, play in the Fuchsias' 1939 reserves premiership side.

In 1946, Vic Chanter resumed his football career, this time with Fitzroy, for whom he would play 108 VFL games over the course of the next seven seasons without registering a single goal.  The quintessential player 'the fans love to hate', he once had a bottle thrown at him during the course of a game and, true to his image, made as if to hurl it back at the offender.

A 'Big V' interstate representative, Chanter won Fitzroy's 1951 best and fairest award.

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Wilfred Chaplin (West Adelaide)

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Wilfred 'Chatta' Chaplin was a resolute and extremely consistent defender for West Adelaide in 89 league games between 1924 and 1929.  Most of those games were played at centre half back, in which position he was among the best players afield as the red and blacks overcame North Adelaide by 13 points in the 1927 challenge final.  Late in the 1929 season Chaplin sustained an injury that not only helped de-rail West's premiership assault for that year but also ultimately ended his league career.  He played 4 times for South Australia.

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Charles Chapman (Fitzroy)

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A highly accomplished all round footballer, Charles Chapman was a key figure in Fitzroy teams between 1924 and 1931, during which time he played 104 VFL games, and kicked 161 goals.  Strong overhead, relentlessly determined, and a fine kick, he played much of his football for the Maroons as a follower, but was also a fine centre half forward when required.  Some idea of the high esteem in which he was held can be gauged from the fact that he was selected to represent the 'Big V' no fewer than 10 times during his career.  Chapman captained the Roys in 1929, and was the club's top goal kicker the following year with 46 goals. 

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Les Charge (South Melbourne)

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Les Charge was a powerful, team-orientated tap ruckman whose highly promising league career was cut short by World War One.  He joined South Melbourne from one of that club's most fruitful recruiting grounds in Leopold, and made the first of an eventual 65 VFL appearances in 1910.  He was a member of South's losing challenge final teams against Essendon in 1912 and Carlton in 1914, being listed high among the best players after the latter game.  Les Charge retired at the end of the 1915 season.

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Jack Charlesworth (Cananore)

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Jack Charlesworth was a rugged, strongly built, old fashioned stay-at-home type of centreman who was a key member of Cananore's powerful 1920s combinations which landed both local and state premierships in 1921-2 and 1925-6-7.  He played a total of 196 games for the Canaries, and was a regular TFL and state representative, including games at both the 1924 Hobart and 1927 Melbourne carnivals.  After he retired as a player he was made a life member of the club.

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Henry Chase (Brunswick)

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Powerful, extremely quick, and highly versatile, Brunswick's Henry Chase was one of the foremost VFA identities of the early twentieth century.  He made his senior debut as an eighteen year old in 1902, and played his last game nineteen years later.  When Brunswick reached four consecutive premiership play-offs between 1908 and 1911 Chase was the team's major driving force, so that "beat Chase and you beat Brunswick" became the catch-cry of opposition supporters.  This was easier said than done, and clubs were prepared to go to quite exorbitant lengths in order to undermine his effectiveness.  On one notorious occasion, for example, Footscray was alleged to have offered him a financial inducement to 'go easy', to which Chase replied: "Sorry but I couldn't play that way.  Even if I took your money, once I got out on the ground, I would forget about it and play to win.  That is the way I play" (see footnote 1).

In 1909, when Brunswick secured its first ever VFA premiership by coming from behind to beat Prahran in the challenge final, Henry Chase starred on a half forward flank, but many of his best games were played in the centre.  Between 1912 and 1915, when he was arguably the most influential player in the VFA, league clubs clamoured for his signature, but to no avail.  His importance to Brunswick was clearly evidenced by the fact that, when he missed the second half of the 1914 season through injury, the Magpies failed to qualify for the finals for the only time in that four season period.  Chase officially retired at the end of the 1919 season after an unknown number of VFA games, but he made a one match comeback in 1920 on the occasion of an award presentation.

Footnotes

1.  A Fair And Honest Game by Les Barnes and Laurie Cunningham, page 23.  Return to Main Text

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Barry Cheatley (North Melbourne)

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Burly, tough and resolute, Barry Cheatley gave North Melbourne sound service as a defender in 81 VFL games between 1959 and 1964.  His subsequent term as the club's marketing director during its rise to pre-eminence in the early 1970s arguably represented an even more important contribution to the Kangaroos' cause.

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John Cheel (Western Districts)

by Murray Bird and Peter Blucher

John Cheel was a strong centre half back who came to Wests from Footscray under 19s in 1966. He was a member of the Bulldogs' 1966-7 losing grand final teams and runner-up in the 1966 Grogan Medal.  He eventually tasted success after shifting to the then Southport Magpies in the Gold Coast competition with three premierships in the period between 1975 and 1978.  Cheel played for Queensland on 5 occasions, with the most memorable being his blanketing of the great Alex Jesaulenko in a victory over the ACT.

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Reginald Cherry (Perth)

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The most noteworthy and successful of four brothers to play for Perth during the first decade of the twentieth century, Reg Cherry was an outstanding all round footballer who played a key role in the club's gradual emergence as a power.  He made his senior debut in 1900, and was at full back when the red and blacks controversially overcame East Fremantle in the 1907 grand final.  An extremely adaptable footballer, Cherry could play in most positions on the field, and was often used to fill in where the club most needed him.  In the 1908 finals series, for example, he played in the centre in the 4 point semi final win over West Perth, and was on a half forward flank in the grand final meeting with East Fremantle, which Old Easts won comfortably.  When Reg Cherry retired in 1911 he had played a club record 160 senior games, a tally that was to be overhauled by Alex Clarke the following year.

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Keith Chessell (Sturt)

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Despite his lightweight (187cm, 75.5kg) frame, Sturt's Keith Chessell played a fair number of his 181 league games as a ruckman, where his agility, prodigious leaping ability and surprising strength enabled him to compete more than favourably with his mostly bigger opponents.  He also played as a ruck-rover on many occasions, combining with the likes of Paul Bagshaw and John Murphy to give the Double Blues probably the best on-ball division in the state at the time.  A product of the club's junior ranks, he made his senior debut in 1964, and thereafter never looked back.  One of eight Sturt players to play in every one of Sturt's five premiership teams between 1966 and 1970, he often reserved his most imposing displays for finals, with his 8 goal performance against Port Adelaide in the 2nd semi final of 1968 arguably the pick of them.  Always dangerous near goal, he booted a total of 177 league goals, and was the Blues' top goal kicker, with 40, in 1968.  Perhaps his most memorable goal came in the dying seconds of a match against Port Adelaide at Alberton in 1966; Sturt had trailed all afternoon, but with Chessell's goal it took the lead, which it held, by 2 points.

Keith Chessell, who played 4 interstate games for South Australia, kicking 2 goals, retired from league football in 1974.

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Harold Chesswass (Collingwood)

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Tough and unremitting, Harold 'Bottles' Chesswass was a member of all four of Collingwood's 1927-30 premiership teams.  He may not have been the most extravagantly talented of players, but his unstinting commitment to the team plan and his tremendous reliability made him an indispensable cog in the McHale machine.  He spent a total of ten seasons with the Woods, beginning in 1922, and played 154 VFL games.

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John Chick (New Town/Glenorchy & Carlton)

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John Chick began his senior football career with New Town and was one of that team's best players in its 1951 grand final annihilation of North Hobart.  The following year he was cleared to Carlton, where he went on to give superb service in 119 VFL games over the next nine seasons.  Quick, clever and highly skilful, he was widely acknowledged as one of the finest wingmen in the game.  He represented the VFL on several occasions including the 1956 Perth carnival, after which he was selected in the All Australian team.

In 1959 and 1960, his last two seasons with the club, Chick served as Carlton vice-captain.  He returned home to his original club, now re-named Glenorchy, in 1961 after being appointed as captain-coach, and in his first season in charge he got the team into the grand final.  In 1962 and '63, however, the side failed to contest the finals, after which Chick resigned as coach, remaining at the club for one final year as a player only. 

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Richard Chirgwin (Richmond, Footscray, South Melbourne, North Melbourne)

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He may not have exactly been a household name, but Richard Chirgwin was one of those rare footballers whose career took him to no fewer than four different league clubs.  He began with Richmond in 1934, having joined the club from Regent's Park in the Federal Football Association.  A slick and pacy half forward, he played 64 VFL games for the Tigers in six seasons.  In 1940 he played with both Footscray (3 games) and South Melbourne (1 game).  He rounded off his career with 15 games at North Melbourne between 1941 and 1943.

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Scott Chisholm (St Marys, Claremont, Fremantle, Melbourne, South Fremantle)

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Magical, mercurial, mesmeric, miraculous, marvellous - just a few of the words that might appropriately have been used to describe Scott Chisholm in full flight.  

Chisholm's early senior career was split between St Marys, with whom he gained selection in the 'Northern Territory Team of the Year' for 1992-93, and Claremont, where his pace, anticipation and sublime ball skills were ideally suited to coach Gerard Neesham's renowned 'chip and draw' tactics.  An attacking player by propensity and temperament, Chisholm found himself transformed by Neesham into a vibrant, running half back, instructed to run with the ball whenever possible, drawing opposition players towards him to attempt to tackle before releasing the ball into the space created, where a team mate would inevitably be waiting.

Chisholm continued to play under Neesham at AFL level in 1995 when the Fremantle Dockers took their bows.  The team's revolutionary style of play took the league by storm, and Chisholm's was one of the names most frequently referred to in order to exemplify that style.  After probably reaching his peak as a player in 1996 when he finished 3rd in Fremantle's best and fairest count, Chisholm's form and fitness began to deteriorate.  He moved to Melbourne in 1998 after 63 games for the Dockers, but despite playing some good games for the Demons in his debut season his lack of consistency and erratic kicking caused concern.  He played just 1 game for Melbourne in 2000 before being delisted.

Chisholm resumed his senior league career back in Western Australia at South Fremantle, playing 30 games for the Bulldogs between 2001-3.  After that, he continued with St Marys in the NTFL.

As with Gary Dhurrkay, the report card on Scott Chisholm - the man who went by the nickname 'Prince', because of his insistence that he was related by blood to the British royal family - would probably have to read "could have done better".  Nevertheless, his importance to the Fremantle Football Club during its formative years should not be underestimated, and neither should the quality of his play when injury free, and when unleashed within a team pattern which harnessed and augmented his natural abilities. 

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Bob Chitty (Carlton & Scottsdale)

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A brilliant, versatile footballer for Carlton for over a decade, Bob Chitty's talent seldom enters the discussion when his VFL career comes under review, for one simple, but very valid, reason: Bob Chitty was one of the toughest, most fearsomely aggressive footballers ever to take the field.  Some players manufacture aggression, others seem born to it; as far as Bob Chitty was concerned, aggression oozed out of his every pore.

That said, it was, for the most part, controlled and focused aggression: Chitty was no thug. Reported countless times over the course of his 146 game VFL career, he was suspended for a total of just sixteen weeks, eight of which accrued from his involvement in the multifarious flare-ups that sullied the 1945 so-called 'Bloodbath grand final'.

Recruited by Carlton from Sunshine, Bob Chitty spent a season in the Blues' reserves before making his senior debut in 1936.  Thereafter, he was never dropped, although an inevitable legacy of his style of play was that he often ended up taking the field whilst carrying injuries that would have sidelined lesser men for weeks.  On one occasion the top of the middle finger of Chitty's left hand was sliced off in an industrial accident; Chitty simply had it stitched back on, and the following Saturday he was back doing what he did best, scaring the life out of Carlton's opponents, and giving his own smaller team mates an armchair ride.

In 1938, Bob Chitty was on a half back flank, his favoured position, as Carlton overcame its most hated foe, Collingwood, in the grand final.   Chitty often reserved his most antagonistic performances for the Magpies; in the 1945 preliminary final, for example, his persistent brutalisation of Collingwood champion Des Fothergill was a major contributory factor to his team's win.  Captain of Carlton by that stage, Chitty put in another compelling performance in the following week's grand final against South Melbourne as the Blues secured the second premiership of his career.

Twice a Carlton best and fairest winner, Chitty emphasised that he was eminently capable of playing good football by running 4th in the 1941 Brownlow Medal count.  For the most part, however, Chitty was happy to concentrate on being effective rather than eye-catching; no matter how ostensibly violently he behaved, the underlying aim was always to further the Carlton cause, which is something that Bob Chitty managed with as much passion, and arguably as much efficacy, as anyone.

After departing the VFL scene at the end of the 1946 season, Chitty spent three seasons as captain-coach of Victorian country side Benalla, before finishing his career in the same role at Scottsdale.  Chitty continued to live in Scottsdale after his retirement as a player, describing himself as a 'naturalised Tasmanian'.

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Michael Christian (East Perth & Collingwood)

 

Michael Christian was a strong marking and dynamic key position player who commenced his league career with 82 games for East Perth between 1981 and 1986.  In 1985 he allegedly signed for Claremont, but the contract was disputed and never formally ratified, and he remained with the Royals.  In 1987 he joined Collingwood where he added another 131 senior games over the course of the next decade.  Much of his best football was played in the backlines, but he could also do a job up forward when required.  Michael Christian represented Western Australia 3 times.

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David Christie (Woodville)

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On 11 April 1964 David Christie was a member of the Woodville team which lost to North Adelaide at Prospect in the club's first ever league fixture.  Just over five years later, in the fourth round of the 1969 season at home to West Torrens, he became the 'Peckers' first ever 100 game player.  Woodville lost that fixture as well, albeit by only 2 points, as indeed they lost the overwhelming majority of Christie's 124 games for the club between 1964 and 1970.  Christie, who played Seconds football for the Woodpeckers prior to their elevation to league ranks, was a polished and tenacious rover for much of his career, but also played some fine football in a back pocket during his final few seasons.

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Graham Christie (South Adelaide)

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Graham Christie was the sort of player who sometimes appears inconspicuous because of his seemingly effortless mastery of the basic skills.  Indeed, according to Jeff Pash, he was "monotonously good" (see footnote 1).  The fact that he did almost everything competently made him suited to almost any position, although it was as a defender that he played the majority, and arguably the best, of his football.  He joined South Adelaide in 1956 from Port Pirie and, over the course of the next ten seasons, played a total of 128 league games.  That total would have been considerably higher had he not suffered from a serious back injury during the early 1960s which seriously threatened his career for a time.  Under the coaching of Neil Kerley, however, Christie enjoyed something of an Indian Summer, highlighted by a top quality performance in a back pocket in South's 1964 grand final defeat of Port Adelaide.  Earlier highlights had included a Knuckey Cup for club best and fairest in 1958, captaincy of the side in 1961 and 1962, and 5 interstate appearances for South Australia.

Footnotes

1.  The Pash Papers, page 231.  Return to Main Text

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David Christy (Melbourne, Fremantle, Imperials, East Fremantle)

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Originally from Ballarat, Dave 'Dolly' Christy began his senior football career with the club of that name before joining Melbourne, where he was a key player for over a decade.  In 1896, he headed west, playing briefly with Fremantle and Imperials, before joining the newly formed East Fremantle Football Club in 1898, and it was here in 196 games over the ensuing sixteen seasons that he carved out a reputation for himself as one of the bona fide early champions of the game.

All told, the remarkably athletic and fit Christy, "that marvellous specimen of perennial youth" (see footnote 1), played senior football for 27 years.  Equally at home on a half forward flank or as a follower, he was prominent among East Fremantle's best players time and time again throughout the early 1900s.

In the view of Dolph Heinrichs, who played alongside Christy on many occasions, "He (Christy) was a very great player, comparable with any of the football giants who have worn the Blue and White.  In physique he was slightly below the average height, but weighed about 13 stone.  He was tremendously strong in the back muscles and in the arm and shoulders, and it was almost impossible to unbalance him.......His great value was his ability to force his way out of a pack with the ball by sheer strength and tenacity, and particularly if the position was in front of goal, where he was a fine snapshot.  He lived for football.  On the field he was dour and seldom spoke and there was no joy in the game if the match wasn't won."  (See footnote 2)

Dave Christy died in Adelaide on 2 July 1919, the day before his 50th birthday.  (See footnote 3)

Footnotes

1.  The Footballers by Geoff Christian, page 16.  Return to Main Text

2.  Celebrating 100 Years of Tradition by Jack Lee, page 45.  Return to Main Text

3.  I am indebted to WA football historian and statistician Steve Davies for supplying some of the above information, as well as for correcting some factual errors in Christy's profile as originally published.  Return to Main Text

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Colin Churchett (Glenelg & South Melbourne)

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Glenelg full forward Colin Churchett achieved the distinction of being the first post-World War Two footballer in the SANFL to register 100 goals in a season.  He managed the feat twice, in 1950 and 1951, and all told kicked 555 goals in his 145 game league career (which includes one game played with South Melbourne in 1944, while on war service in Victoria).  

With characteristic eloquence, Jeff Pash described Churchett as "a wizard when it came to the matter of directing the essentially irregular object that is a football through the goals" (see footnote 1).  He did this with almost equal facility in weak Glenelg teams as he did when the club was battling for the premiership.  Although not a particularly long kick, his unerring accuracy extended to both feet, a comparatively rare capability at the time.  He was equally effective from a snap shot or when kicking on the run, but formidable ground play was his acknowledged fortĂ©, with his ability to get boot tellingly to ball in awkward situations unparalleled among South Australian full forwards of his time.

Churchett topped Glenelg's goal kicking list six times in seven years and only Jack Owens and 'Fred' Phillis have kicked more goals in the black and gold.

Footnotes

1.  The Pash Papers by Jeff Pash, page 72. Return to Main Text

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