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Portsmouth chief: Man who was shot ignored commands

Posted to: Crime News Portsmouth

Yelena Denyakina, right, mother of Kirill Denyakin, talks to reporters outside the Portsmouth police chief's office on Thursday. Speaking through a translator, she said she did not believe her son, who was killed by an officer outside an apartment building, would have tried to fight with police. At left is Maurice Wilson, a friend of Denyakin's who let him stay in the building. <span class='credit'>(Patrick Wilson | The Virginian-Pilot)</span>

Yelena Denyakina, right, mother of Kirill Denyakin, talks to reporters outside the Portsmouth police chief's office on Thursday. Speaking through a translator, she said she did not believe her son, who was killed by an officer outside an apartment building, would have tried to fight with police. At left is Maurice Wilson, a friend of Denyakin's who let him stay in the building. (Patrick Wilson | The Virginian-Pilot)

A Kazakh man, Kirill Denyakin, was fatally shot by a Portsmouth police officer. (WVEC photo)
A Kazakh man, Kirill Denyakin, was fatally shot by a Portsmouth police officer. (WVEC photo)

911 call before the shooting

This is the 911 call of a Portsmouth resident reporting someone trying to break the door of her apartment building. The officer who responded to the call fatally shot Kirill Denyakin, 26, Portsmouth police said.

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PORTSMOUTH

The initial investigation into the police shooting death of an unarmed man Saturday night shows he charged at an officer and ignored commands after a woman reported him trying to break open a door, Chief Ed Hargis said Thursday.

Hargis spoke at a news conference at his office, where police released a recording of the 911 call in which a woman inside an apartment building at 454 Green St. reported that a man she did not know was trying to break in. She relayed information being given to her by a female neighbor.

Kirill Denyakin, 26, a Kazakh national and cook at the Renaissance Portsmouth Hotel, was banging on the door. He was intoxicated, according to police and friends, and had been staying in the building with a friend. Acquaintances originally incorrectly identified him as Kreal Suchin.

They knew him as "K" or "KGB."

An officer responded to the call and gave commands to Denyakin, causing him to turn around, the chief said, adding that the investigation is not complete.

This was the description of the incident given by Hargis:

"The suspect disregards the verbal commands being issued by the officer. He immediately places his hands at the midsection of his body, in the waistband area, and then charges at the officer. The officer begins to retreat toward the sidewalk of Green Street while giving additional verbal commands. The suspect continues his advance on the officer, causing the officer to discharge his service weapon in an effort to stop the threat. This encounter lasted less than two minutes from the officer's (10:12 p.m.) arrival to the discharge of the weapon."

When asked whether the officer perceived that his life was in danger, Hargis said, "At this time, because the interviews aren't completed yet, I'm not going to say what the officer perceived when he discharged his weapon."

Earlier Saturday, Denyakin had a dispute with someone in the apartment building and was told to leave, Hargis said.

Police will receive a toxicology report for Denyakin and will have forensic evidence from the scene tested.

Friends and co-workers of Denyakin said they were shocked that he was involved in the shooting. They described him as a good friend and a hard worker who didn't lose his temper. Some Olde Towne residents said he was well known in the area.

Maurice Wilson, the friend with whom Denyakin had been staying, said he saw Denyakin around 9 p.m. Saturday. Wilson briefly left work after his wife told him Denyakin was drunk. Wilson said he and another man had to help carry Denyakin down the sidewalk because he was so intoxicated.

"He couldn't even walk... he's not in a stage where he can attack somebody," Wilson said Thursday. "I told him to go back in the house and go to sleep."

Wilson had returned to his job when the shooting happened.

He was upset as he stood outside Hargis' office after the news conference.

"You can't justify something like that," he said.

The Kazakhstan government has paid for Denyakin's mother to travel to Portsmouth and for his body to be returned, an embassy spokeswoman said.

"This is our citizen, and our embassies are always helping our citizens wherever they are," Meruyert Saudabay said. "We will be following this story."

The mother, Yelena Denyakina, spoke to reporters through a translator after the news conference and said her son would not have fought with police.

"Maybe he just fell down on the steps," she said. "He's very smart. He wants to just make his life better. He never would do something stupid to fight with police."

The officer who shot Denyakin has not been identified and has been placed on administrative leave during an investigation, a standard procedure in police-involved shootings. He has been with Portsmouth police for 3-1/2 years, Hargis said.

The findings will be presented to the commonwealth's attorney. Police also are reviewing whether the officer followed department policies.

Patrick Wilson, (757)769-3351, patrick.wilson@pilotonline.com; Twitter.

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this is a punishment without trial or investigation

Officer decided to kill not to protect himself. Why he didn't shoot at legs or shoulder? Why he shot 11 times not 1 or 2? What is going on with America?

youve never shot a gun before have you

in the movies, shooting someone in the leg stops them. the lone ranger regularly shot guns out of peoples hands. in real life, these are trick shots and CAN NOT be made under the stresses and time constraints involved in these situations.

As much respect as I have

As much respect as I have with law enforcement, I have to say I have very little faith in the PPD. I lived a block away from where this happened for several years, and I could tell you a dozen stories that paint a clear picture of *some* of the incompetent officers in Portsmouth. At the same time, I'm sure there are good ones as well.

The only people that really know what happened that night are the officer and the deceased. I hope the incident is thoroughly investigated - by a department other than the PPD - so a fair and objective conclusion can be made. Whether this could have been prevented or not, there are many people mourning this young man's life right now. I hope everyone involved, including the officer, can find some peace.

A drunk person keeps

A drunk person keeps approaching an officer with his hands in his waistband is justifiably shot by a cop? Yep. You have to judge the officer by the information HE had at hand. Drunk subject refusing commands to stop with his hands in his waistband...what is in that waistband? A gun? A knife? The average person can cover 30 feet and strike a killing blow with a hand held weapon in 1.5 seconds (see 'Tueller Drill). The avg reactionary gap of the average person, even if expecting an attack, is just under 1 second. So, the officer, at 30 feet, has around .5 seconds to defend his life if the suspect charges. It takes almost NO time to pull a weapon from your waistband if you're already holding it. Kudos to the officer.

Really. The average person

Really. The average person can run at over 13 MPH while pulling a weapon from their waistband and deliver a fatal blow while also being drunk in 1.5 seconds? Is everyone trained to be a ninja now?

ninjas vs pirates

the dennis tuller drill shows that yes, the average person can cover 21 feet and deliver a fatal blow with a concealed edged weapon, before the average officer can draw his weapon and fire.

A drunk person keeps

A drunk person keeps approaching an officer with his hands in his waistband is justifiably shot by a cop? Yep. You have to judge the officer by the information HE had at hand. Drunk subject refusing commands to stop with his hands in his waistband...what is in that waistband? A gun? A knife? The average person can cover 30 feet and strike a killing blow with a hand held weapon in 1.5 seconds (see 'Tueller Drill). The avg reactionary gap of the average person, even if expecting an attack, is just under 1 second. So, the officer, at 30 feet, has around .5 seconds to defend his life if the suspect charges. It takes almost NO time to pull a weapon from your waistband if you're already holding it. Kudos to the officer.

I can't believe the complete

I can't believe the complete disrespect for police all these people have. These people deal with some of the worst things every day so you can stay safe. These people do this mostly thankless job that many people do not understand. I do not believe for one second this police officer would ever want to kill a person, but I'm sure he does want to go home to his family. This police officer is probably very hurt he did have to use lethal force. I have one question that in my opinion automatically clears this officer of any wrong doing, because this could have been completely avoidable.

Did the person that the

Did the person that the police officer was giving lawful commands to listen and obey those commands? If he did not then whatever happens after that point is his fault!

Nope wrong again, There is no law that says the DEATH Penalty

is the immediate and correct response for failure to obey verbal commands from anyone. If there is please cite the code from state, City or Federal laws.

Nope wrong again, if the subject is deaf, autistic, mentally impaired, physically injured or severely inebriated and unable to comply with verbal commands THEN WHAT HAPPENS IS MOST DEFINITELY NOT THE Subject's FAULT.

If an autistic person didn't follow your commands do you think it is still okay to shoot them or that whatever happens is their FAULT? Please answer this one question.

I watched a Chesapeake officer hold his weapon on an autistic 16 year-old. The officer just got mad because the child just kept smiling back at him and the officer thought he was mocking him.

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