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Alexander
Valuation Board


Joined: 24 Nov 2002
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 1150
Location: Brescia, Italy

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 9:49 am Reply with quote Back to top

This was a very interesting interview and Paul Jaquays was very amenable to my questions. Truly a class guy! If you knew any web site willing to host the interview, let me know. Meanwhile, our community gets first look Very Happy


Paul Jaquays is not among the most known game designers, especially among fans of retrogaming games and gaming products (with minds perhaps more occupied by the likes of Marc Miller, Greg Stafford and of course the late Gary Gygax) , but he should surely be: it has a really impressive bibliography and ludography (http://www.pen-paper.net/rpgdb.php?op=showcreator&creatorid=587) and, most importantly, he can do everything: art, writing, editing… Finding such a sum of talents is very rare in a single individual so, when I incidentally stumbled in him on Internet, I could not resist asking for an interview, a request that he very kindly granted. But you can find more about him on his own website: http://paul.jaquays.com/

Paul, let me start saying that is a great pleasure interviewing somebody with a long, distinguished and varied career like yours. As I have written in the introduction, it’s really rare to find people with your amazing mix of talents… and still working in the field of gaming, albeit in the videogaming one… Well, as usual, let’s start talking a bit about you: where are you from (besides the US, but consider this interview will have a lot of non American readers…), how old are you, what your studies were, what are your hobbies and of course how you discovered gaming…

Jaquays: I currently live in the American south, near Dallas, Texas where I have been working in the computer and video game industry for the past 12 years. But I was born in the north, in the state of Michigan (the state shaped like a mitten) and spent my childhood and teen years in various towns and cities in Indiana and Michigan. Although I’m one of the pioneers of the role-play game industry, I was a young pioneer, only 19 when my first art was published. So after 33 years of making games, I’m still only 52 years old.  

My degree is in art, focusing on two-dimensional coursework such as painting, drawing and print-making. Some of my personal game-related projects actually ended up contributing towards my major and awards I received upon graduation.

I had always been interested in playing games and even making them. Like most kids of my generation, we grew up with the sort of outdoor role playing games that children play like army man, cops and robbers, cowboys and Indians. No rules, just fun. Indoors, my younger brother and I used to make our own simple board games as children and as teens, developed some simple (VERY simple) miniatures rules for fighting massive battles with armies of plastic soldiers. He was much more the gamer than I and was particularly interested in games produced by Avalon Hill, even subscribing to AH’s magazine The General.

Because of that subscription, a Texas game company called Metagaming sent him a sample copy of The Space Gamer ... which contained two reviews of a new game called ... Dungeons & Dragons. My brother read the reviews to me over the phone while I worked my evening shift at the college radio station. It was an event that changed my life.

Reading in your bibliography, I notice you started very early to ‘work’ in gaming launching your own magazine, The Dungeoneer. You were involved in that publication for over three years. The Dungeoneer is still a publication with some following among collectors. Can you tell us something about the fanzine, its history and its demise?

Jaquays: The first thing I did upon discovering hobby gaming was to contribute art to The Space Gamer. I wanted to become an illustrator, and saw games as a way to achieve that goal. I had already spent part of the previous summer doing much of the pre-press production work on my small college’s newspaper, so I had experience prepping a periodical for publication. Inspired by Dungeons & Dragons, it was a natural extension of my interest in publishing to fulfil a need that my friends and I saw in this new hobby. We designed adventures, created new monsters, and wrote articles on gaming, and fiction. I did all the art for the first issue. My friend Mark Hendricks and I paid for the printing and we mailed it to about a hundred or so gamers whose names and addresses we collected from other game publications. We soon had contributions of art and writing that came from subscribers. For the next year and a half we tried to put out an issue every 2 to 3 months on top of being full time students, having part time jobs, and trying to play games. We continued to expand our subscription base through word of mouth and promotional notes in other magazines. Very quickly, in addition to subscriptions, we were selling the magazine to hobby shops in the USA, Canada, Great Britain, and Germany.

In late 1977, I had to make a choice between completing my degree and continuing to publish the magazine. I sold the magazine and its subscription list to (the late) Chuck Anshell to be published by his Chicago-based company, Anshell Miniatures. Chuck produced two copies of the magazine before he in turn, went to work for Judges Guild. Judges Guild published The Dungeoneer for a number of issues before rolling it in with their house organ, The Judges Guild Journal. The Dungeoneer Journal later became Pegasus magazine.

Did you ever think to make Dungeoneer a professional or semi-professional magazine such as The Dragon or Space Gamer?

Jaquays: No. We sold some local advertising for the magazine, but not enough to support printing it or paying contributors for work. We were happy to keep it an amateur publication.

I notice you worked with Metagaming and so you knew the legendary Howard Thompson. What were your duties for Metagaming? And what are your memories of Thompson?

Jaquays: I met Howard on the occasion of my job interview with Metagaming Concepts in the spring of 1978. I was there in Austin for a couple days at the end of my spring break in my last year of college. While I remember meeting both Steve Jackson (later the founder of Steve Jackson Games) and Forrest Brown (the head of Martian Metals), I don’t have specific memories of Howard other than that he was a dark-haired man about 10 or so years older than I was. Perhaps if they hadn’t passed on hiring me to bring on a secretary instead, I might have different memories.

After working on Dungeoneer you joined Judges Guild, one of the most important publishers of RPG aids at the time, as artist/designer and stayed there for one year. During your stint you worked on various publications and one, Duck Tower, is still fondly remembered and sought after by collectors and RuneQuest fans. What kind of company was Judges Guild? How was working there? Did you have regular contacts with Bob Bledsaw?

Jaquays: While I worked as an employee of Judges Guild, I worked off site, from my home studio in another state. I didn’t want to move to central Illinois then and didn’t really want to work in the smoke-filled JG offices. Judges Guild was a small, family run company with both the good and bad that comes of that. The folks there were very enthusiastic about gaming and dedicated to what they did. But looking back on things, it was a fan company. None of the production people, with the possible exception of the typesetter were “pros” at what they did and the production values of product showed that. Being a kid just out of college, I probably wasn’t much better. I had some interaction with Bob, but not a lot. He and I didn’t always see eye to eye on things. Some of that was him. A good deal of it was me. I was talented and creative and a hard worker, but didn’t always want to work on what the company wanted me to do. After a year of that I gave notice. After that, Judges Guild didn’t want to pay me what I felt I was worth for free lance work, so other than projects I did for the Dungeoneer (more for love than money), I never worked on a Guild product again. I left at least two projects unfinished ... Duck Tower and a Dwarven mine adventure for Runequest.

What was exactly the relationship between Judges Guild and TSR? I have read that Judges Guild sent its projects to TSR for consideration and approval when they wanted to use the 'approved for D&D/AD&D line and that some ideas were rejected.

Jaquays: Judges Guild was one of TSR’s first licensees for D&D and AD&D products. As I understand it, when TSR issued the license for game adventures, they didn’t think there was a market for premade game master material. Judges Guild, to its credit, showed that there was. I’m certain that some projects were rejected. Very likely TSR became aware that as a licensor, the quality of licensed product reflected on them. By the time I joined JG in 1978 they were literally in competition with each other in the D&D premade adventure market. Though to be honest, JG was selling campaign content and TSR was selling mostly polished tournament adventures.

Is it true that TSR cancelled the contract with Judges Guild because its products were considered of insufficient quality, a detriment to TSR's flagship D&D and AD&D games, and that TSR staffed used too much time to verify and correct Judges Guild's projects?  

Jaquays: I don’t know about exactly why the contract was cancelled. Judges Guild was turning out a lot of product very quickly and using less care in production and using fairly cheap printing processes. I know that I was often dissatisfied with printing and production quality on pieces I designed and illustrated. Printing often seemed slipshod to me. I suppose that TSR saw those flaws also. I learned later that the TSR employee responsible for approvals felt that JG products weren’t meeting TSR’s expectations and was not shy about saying so. He wasn’t popular with Bob. Oddly enough, that guy later worked for me at Coleco as one of my designers several years later and is still one of my friends.

After working for Judges Guild, in 1979 you became a freelance and so worked for companies such as Chaosium, SPI, and others. Some books, a sure seal of quality, are still remembered and appreciated today, for example Griffin Mountain. It seems you liked the classic RuneQuest game... Why did you decided to go freelance instead to be an employee? More freedom to pursue the projects you liked, more money or what?

Jaquays: When I left Judges Guild, it was to be a free lancer, be my own boss and work on projects that interested me. I can’t remember even thinking about joining on staff with another company at that time ... though I think there was at least one local graphic design studio that would have liked to take me on. Through necessity, I worked on a lot of different projects, not all game related.  The money was an issue in my departure from JG. Judges Guild paid the minimum wage, which in 1978-79 was not much. Freelancing as a young artist and designer didn’t pay much better, but I enjoyed it more.

What is the project you worked on in this period that males you proudest? And why?

Jaquays: I would have to say The Enchanted Wood for SPI. While Griffin Mountain was a truly epic project, it was not my own and I was admittedly disappointed by some of the choices that Chaosium made in printing it. Rudy Kraft started the project as “Adventures Beyond the Pass” for Judges Guild, but he saw that it was missing something. He had finished my work on Duck Tower, so he contacted me about this new project. At his request I fleshed out his extensive stat work, created some maps, did some typography design, and added a great deal of the unique character that it came to possess. Greg Stafford came in and made it Glorantha (his Runequest world). On the other hand, The Enchanted Wood was all mine. I began with the premise of a setting made of interrelated random encounters (something I started in both Duck Tower and Griffin Mountain), let myself be inspired a bit by Piers Anthony’s Xanth tales, and created some truly odd and memorable characters, including several based on co-workers from Coleco. Bits and pieces of that adventure passed into the mythology of TSR’s own Forgotten Realms setting (TSR bought SPI in the early 80s) when I included them in FR5 The Savage Frontier which I wrote for TSR. Some of that survived to become part of the canonical back story of the world in later products.

After your long freelance period, you started working for Coleco in 1980 and stayed there for five years. What were your duties at Coleco and what were the most important projects you worked on there?

Jaquays:  I began by working as contractor. Michael A. Stackpole (the novelist ... but not back then) and I were hired to work out a role play game idea for a new electronic toy that Coleco was researching. The toy could read in cards printed with bar code and output both simulated speech and simple number processing. Synthesized speech was big news for toys in the early 80s. We made a few prototype games, including a game where you tried to guess the identity of a spy by the clues it spoke. I still have the art I created for those card prototypes. That toy was never produced. Michael left after his contract was done and went onto become a famous writer and I stayed on as a full time game designer, working on electronic games for the next year.

When ColecoVision became the primary focus of my department, I stepped into the role of group manager over the Design and newly created Art departments in Advanced Research and Development (ARD) I recruited the first artists and designers for ColecoVision and we developed the processes by which all Coleco’s video games would be designed.

Four projects or groups of projects that I worked on stand out. I contributed to the design of the Pac*Man tabletop arcade game. Jay Belsky and I did design research, design documentation for tabletop Donkey Kong and designed the actual vacuum fluorescent tube art work for the game. As group manager and later director, I had a hand in every video game produced by Coleco for the ColecoVision console, and did the same for the games on the ADAM computer.

The ColecoVision game system was the most successful game console of the '80s and it sold the amazing number of 1.5 million copies in 1983. Despite this, in 1985 Coleco was in deep crisis. What were, in your opinion, the reasons for Coleco's crisis? Did you see the problems coming in and did you have any input on the ill fated ADAM computer system?

Jaquays: I don’t know if it was the most successful, but it was certainly one of the top three of the early 80s. The crisis for Coleco was likely an extension of the video game fallout affecting the entire industry (which was more toy focused in those days ... computers were still hobby items). It really began in 1984 and while the ADAM computer appeared to be a failure, I don’t think it was a large enough part of Coleco’s portfolio to be the thing that ultimately killed them. I believe they were brought down by their successes, not their failures. Specifically The Cabbage Patch Kids dolls. I think that company management believed that the dolls would continue to sell at the frenzied levels they did when they were first released. They saw Cabbage Patch as having the same sort of market strength and “legs” that the Barbie doll had. Fairly quickly there came a point where everyone who wanted the dolls, had as many as they desired. Unfortunately for Coleco, they had been ramping up production of the dolls and expanding the product line and ended up with a lot of toys that they couldn’t sell.

The ADAM computer ended up being the all-consuming focus of my department ... well, of the rest of the department. My design group and most of the art group stayed focused on games for ColecoVision and then for the ADAM. Although I was technically a part of the leadership team on the computer, I wasn’t involved in it day to day. For better or worse, I will take responsibility for the computer using one of the hand controllers as the numerical input pad for the computer ... even though the numbers were arranged wrong on the hand controller. I don’t remember an overlay being provided for it to correct that.

After leaving Coleco, in July 1985 you joined a company called Penguin Products and stayed there till April 1986. What kind of company was Penguin and what products did it make? What were your duties there?

Jaquays: Penguin Products began its life as “International Omni Corp”, founded by former Coleco Executive Vice President Eric Bromley. It was essentially a small electronic product design firm that moved into manufacturing and marketing some of its products. While I was there, the company produced three projects ... the Alpha-dial 2000 a fairly amazing ... and expensive ... multi-function office telephone (for which I regret not getting a sample), and two pieces of “electronic jewellery” under the L’Ectronique brand. The premise for the jewellery was to combine useful electronics with costume jewellery. There was a bracelet with a slide away panel that revealed a digital watch with some appointment book functions (very basic), and an FM radio who antenna formed the necklace. Other items were planned, including LED earrings.

I was Director of Production at Penguin Products, in charge of getting designs prototyped and into production, a job which I came to thoroughly dislike. But it was also a job I needed in order to take care of my family. Nevertheless, I was elated, rather than upset, when I was laid off from it less than a year into my time there. Later on, the company got into developing video games ... but not successfully.

From May 1987 to September 1993 you managed the Jaquays Design Studio and you worked for a lot of companies. What were the most interesting products you worked on or simply designed for scratch? How was the freelancing experience in this period, after the one from 1979 to 1981?

Jaquays: Jaquays Design Studio was a name I created to give my relaunched freelancing career a sense of stability and presence. For the most part, it was just me doing the work. It allowed me to work on any type of project that came along that interested me and could provide proper compensation (I had a young family to support). I wrote and edited game adventure product for TSR’s D&D and AD&D product lines, including the Master Level D&D epic Talons of Night and the Campaign Guide & Catacomb Sourcebook ... the latter becoming the last word on the subject for several years ... and the last project I would write for them. I created the sometimes controversial character creation series Central Casting for Task Force Games and put out three CityBooks for Flying Buffalo. I designed most of the content for Interplay’s Lord of the Rings volume 1 PC game and did a LOT of development work on Bards Tale IV (which was killed before completion). Though I did a huge amount of game and fiction illustration during that time, my cover for TSR’s Dragon Mountain boxed set is the piece by which most fans will know my art work. Coincidentally, that’s also art Tony DiTerlizzi’s first game project ... fans may know his work from The Spiderwyck Chronicles.

I enjoyed freelancing. I had a good reputation, made a lot of friends with other professionals, and worked on a variety of projects. I quit designing game adventures because I found I was starting to imitate my earlier work, and frankly it didn’t pay as well as the same amount of time spent on artwork. For those who remember, the early 90s were also financial hard times, and I found that the work I could get didn’t go far enough to pay the bills.

If I guess correctly, you joined TSR in 1993 to work as a full time illustrator. How was working at TSR at the time? What were the most important projects you were involved with?

Jaquays: I joined TSR to paint book and game covers, full time, which was actually one of my early career goals (not to work for TSR, but to paint book covers). I started as the line artist for the game world Mystara and the new juvenile book line. Eventually, I became the line artist for Dragon Dice and replaced Jeff Easley as the line artist of core Advanced Dungeons & Dragons. Although it wasn’t TSR’s finest hour as a product line, I’m very pleased with my work on Dragon Dice, both as a cover artist and as an icon designer.

You had a brief stint (six months) as a director of graphics at TSR then you decided to step down but in this period I see you has input about Dragon Dice and Birthright. How was the Dragon Dice game created and what were TSR’s expectations for it? I remember reading that the first wave of product was sold out very quickly and TSR reordered a lot of product still expecting great sales, but when the product arrived the consumer interest was no more. Some people believe that Dragon Dice has some part in TSR’s demise. Is this correct?

Jaquays: Designer Les Smith came up with the rules for Dragon Dice. It may have been his concept also, or simply an assignment to come up with an expandable, collectible game product in a new area (WotC owned the market for collectible card games at that point). His “dice as miniatures” approach was genius. Les made the game work and be fun with dice marked with stickers on the side. The art graphics team I headed at that time made them look good.

I think TSR hoped the game would have mass market appeal and pushed it as such at Toy Fair that year. However, the initial package design was anything but mass market. Nothing about it said “easy, fun, toy-like, or approachable.” It was dark, scary and conservatively designed where it needed to be brightly-colored, bold and eye-catching. I think that the temptation to get a great deal on initial dice sets through volume purchasing may be what got TSR into trouble there. It may have been what pushed TSR over the edge, but by that point they had a long history of business dealings that were not working well for them. Looking back at it, TSR was turning out more products per month than Judges Guild ever did, while the reality of the marketplace was that people were buying fewer role play game products.

I have heard a lot of horror stories about Lorraine Dille Williams, TSR’s owner and president. Did you get any contact with her? What kind of person was she? And, in your opinion, does she deserve the scorn and sometime hate she gets from a lot of fans?

Jaquays: Everyone in TSR’s R&D departments had some sort of interaction with Lorraine. My first came when I interviewed at TSR and she ruled out my being able to freelance for non-game industry clients.  But I didn’t actually work with her directly until I became director of graphics. A business owner doesn’t necessarily need to work in the business to make it successful. That’s why one has employees who are good at what they do. From my perspective, she never really seemed to “get” what TSR and the hobby game business was about, yet ran it like she did. Fans have a love/hate relationship with EVERYONE, so who is to say whether she deserves it? Perhaps folks need to ask themselves what decisions they would have made in the same situations and would the outcomes have been better for their choices.

Did you stay with TSR till the end, when the company was sold to Wizards of the Coast? When did employees realize something was wrong?

Jaquays:  I voluntarily parted ways with TSR in early 1997, several months before the company was sold. TSR laid off about 20% of the staff in December of 1996. I was part of the 15 or so staff members who were asked to sit watch in the executive conference room with Lorraine as the layoffs occurred and watched friends be escorted out of the company, carrying small boxes of personal effects. That was when the company’s condition finally became apparent to me. Even so, I would likely have stayed through to end. Some managers did know about what was going on and departed early. I’m certain quite a few employees had a good idea where things were at long before the first layoff. About a month after the ’96 layoff, I was presented an opportunity to work in the computer game industry and left TSR for Texas and id Software.

Were you offered to work for Wizards of the Coast and so moving to Seattle?

Jaquays: As I noted, I was gone well before that took place. I sometimes wonder if I would have made the cut that took some folks out to Seattle and left others behind. Wizards invited me to participate in a game festival in southern Germany a couple years later as the guest Dungeons & Dragons artist. It was a great opportunity. I took my 15-year-old son with me and we both had a lot of fun.

After leaving TSR, you started working with id software from 1997 till 2002 and for Ensemble Studios from 2002 to the beginning of 2009. You worked on very important games such as Quake 2 and 3, Age of Empires and Halo Wars. They are all very successful games, Halo Wars I guess wildly successful. What is your opinion about the videogame and the game industries today?

Jaquays: Halo Wars did very well for Microsoft. I think almost everyone knew it would. Unfortunately, that “almost” included the folks who made the decisions about Ensemble Studios’ future.

Years ago, I realized that video games would replace role play games as the rite-of-passage entertainment for many game players. I wasn’t the first TSR staffer to leave for the video game industry. The experience the video games provide is not the same as that provided by RPGs, but it is more accessible. Buy a game. Install it into your computer. Connect online. Play. The game walks you through the process of playing. And you can do it without having to go somewhere, or negotiate complex personal schedules, or read through volumes of rule books to resolve a point of play. It’s not the same thing or the same experience as true role playing. But it’s easier to manage.  

From my point of view, video games are finishing the job that collectible card games did on the hobby game industry, diverting both players and game developers away from role playing.

I think the hobby game industry has almost returned to its roots of over 30 years ago. Small companies run by dedicated hobbyists providing entertainment to other hobbyists. There is still a diversity of role play gaming opportunities, but the “big-ness” that the industry had in the 80s and early 90s is gone. I think that’s a good thing ... unless you want to make a career out of it. Most of my friends still “working” on hobby games have day jobs, either in video games, or in “the real world.”

The video game industry is going strong as far as sales and quality of product is concerned. Both keep going up. But now, the publishers and developers are past the “crazy money” stage and are trying to control costs. That means less money spent on big trade shows, and trimming back on the biggest cost factor of all ... people. This is good news for companies running outsourcing businesses from locales where labor is inexpensive. But it’s bad news for studio employees who are being made redundant because of it. As I tell the families of students hoping to make it into the game industry ... the industry as a whole is strong ... individual studios and developers, not so much.

Which brings me to where I am right now: redundant and looking for the right situation that can use a veteran artist and game developer.

Thanks for your time!
Badmike
Grandstanding Collector


Joined: 23 Jun 2003
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 6642
Location: DFW TX

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 10:54 am Reply with quote Back to top

Thanks man, everyone going to the NTRPG Con should read that so as to get to know Paul before his appearance!

BTW, Paul has actually registered for a couple of events.....so attendees to the NTRPG Con may be playing with him!  

Mike B.
Kingofpain89
Long-Winded Collector


Joined: 31 Oct 2004
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 4422
Location: Plano, Texas

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 11:27 am Reply with quote Back to top

I never knew he worked for id software.  I guess the next time I finish one of their games I should stick around during the credits.  To this day Quake 2 is still one of my favorite PC games and Doom 3 is pants-wettingly frightening to play.  Twisted Evil

Great article!
grodog
Long-Winded Collector


Joined: 16 Nov 2002
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 3961
Location: Wichita, KS, USA

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 11:48 am Reply with quote Back to top

Great interview! Very Happy
JasonZavoda
JG Valuation Board


Joined: 12 Jul 2007
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 2534

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 12:09 pm Reply with quote Back to top

Fantastic!

But Paul Jaquays is a legend to me. Is it true that he isn't as well known as some of the other giants of gaming?
Gnat the Beggar
JG Valuation Board


Joined: 11 Oct 2004
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 4419
Location: Texas

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 12:25 pm Reply with quote Back to top

   
JasonZavoda wrote:
Fantastic!
But Paul Jaquays is a legend to me.
Is it true that he isn't as well known as some of the other giants of gaming?


I agree Jason.
I too see him as a living legend.
Whether he is as well known as some of the other Giants I do not know.
Although, it is certain he is well known amongst the members of the Acaeum.

I am looking forward to meeting him in June along with the other folks attending the NTRPGCON.
ALL of them!
JasonZavoda
JG Valuation Board


Joined: 12 Jul 2007
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 2534

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 3:47 pm Reply with quote Back to top

   
Aneoth wrote:


I agree Jason.
I too see him as a living legend.
Whether he is as well known as some of the other Giants I do not know.
Although, it is certain he is well known amongst the members of the Acaeum.

I am looking forward to meeting him in June along with the other folks attending the NTRPGCON.
ALL of them!


I am envious.

Back in the early 80s when D&D and RPGs were booming there was a thriving game community on the east coast. Even in the 90s there were gaming conventions in southern NJ. But as the niche of RPGs shrank all the conventions disappeared from around here. Luckily the Historical miniature gaming conventions are just around the corner in Lancaster PA otherwise there would be about nothing.
grodog
Long-Winded Collector


Joined: 16 Nov 2002
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 3961
Location: Wichita, KS, USA

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 6:41 pm Reply with quote Back to top

Jason, you should check out Joe Bloch's convention calendar, since he's in North Jersey:  lots of good stuff still in the area, it look like:  http://greyhawkgrognard.blogspot.com/2009/02/my-2009-convention-calend ar.html
JasonZavoda
JG Valuation Board


Joined: 12 Jul 2007
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 2534

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 7:29 pm Reply with quote Back to top

   
grodog wrote:
Jason, you should check out Joe Bloch's convention calendar, since he's in North Jersey:  lots of good stuff still in the area, it look like:  http://greyhawkgrognard.blogspot.com/2009/02/my-2009-convention-calend ar.html


I can recommend the historical minitature gaming cons. There are always fun rules light games going on as well more in depth wargaming.
Gnat the Beggar
JG Valuation Board


Joined: 11 Oct 2004
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 4419
Location: Texas

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 7:41 pm Reply with quote Back to top

As I posted before someplace around here, this will be my first EVER (Fantasy) convention (At least RPG related anyway).

I have never gone to any others.
GENCON might as well be on some distant planet to me.

Only have attended a few local Sci-Fi cons in Plano.
I got to meet Jerry Ryan at one of them.....  Smile
She was very nice. Attended a short discussion group and got a signed Picture.....

Also went to a couple of Comic Book conventions which I was bored to death at. Razz
Mostly just a huge room filled with musty boxes of comics.........

At least up there you are much closer to the major conventions....
Alexander
Valuation Board


Joined: 24 Nov 2002
Last Visit: 21 Feb 2012
Posts: 1150
Location: Brescia, Italy

PostPosted: Sat May 16, 2009 6:11 am Reply with quote Back to top

I'm happy to inform everybody here that ENWorld will host the interview to Paul Jaquays along the ones to Gary Gygax and David Arneson.
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