Pay and Muster Roll of the CSS Sumter, April 1 - September 30, 1861.




The names on this list were transcribed from a copy of the original roll held at the Georgia Historical Society, 501 Whitaker Street, Savannah, Georgia 31401, and used with their kind permission. Additional biographical details have been included for some of the names on the list, and the source of this information is noted at the end of the list. As more information comes to hand, this page will be updated on an occasional basis.

The CSS Sumter was originally the steamer Habana of New Orleans, built at Philadelphia in 1859. It was purchased in April 1861 by the Confederate government, converted into a cruiser, and commissioned on June 3, 1861, under the command of Captain Raphael Semmes. Having escaped the blockade on June 30, she cruised the waters around the West Indies and off the eastern coast of South America, capturing several prizes. She was discovered coaling at St. Pierre, Matinique by the USS Iroquois, but managed to escape and headed for Spain , where she anchored at Cadiz on January 4, 1862. Later she was hemmed in at Gibraltar, where she was sold on December 19, 1862. [1]

The roll consists of six extra large sized pages, containing the names and ranks of the officers, enlisted men and marines aboard the vessel for the second and third quarters of 1861. It includes details of payments for that period, ration allowances, hospital fund deductions, and other allotment and deduction amounts. It also includes most of the officers' signatures, and the marks (witnessed by Acting Master Richard Fielder Armstrong) for most of the enlisted personnel and marines. There are 117 names listed on the roll, including 23 officers and 20 Confederate States Marine Corps personnel.

Although the roll consists of payment and deduction figures in dollars and cents for each person, it is possible to deduce the status of some of the persons named by the amounts listed in some of the columns. For example, there are a number of men who have had an amount deducted under the column headed "Credit For Dead Men's and Deserter's Clothes." From this it can be concluded under what circumstances these particular men left the vessel, and further details can be found in other sources. There are also two sailors who have had an amount listed under the "Amount Checked" column with the notation Ct. [Court] Martial against the amount.

Once again I wish to stress that publication of this page would not have been possible without the kind permission and courtesy of the Georgia Historical Society and it's staff members, especially Ms. Susan Dick. The Society holds many valuable and interesting documents and images, including several relating to the Confederate States Navy. Copies can be obtained by contacting the staff at the address shown above. Please cite Collection Number 779, and the collection title is Sumter, CSS Paper.

The names have been arranged alphabetically and are accompanied by rating, as shown on the roll, and other relevant details.


Richard Abbot, private, CSMC, May 8, 1861.

Jerome Abrio (or Abbreo), seaman, May 27, 1861; sailmaker's mate, May 28, 1861.

Frank Alberg, ordinary seaman, May 9, 1861.

John Allen, landsman, May 4-June 4, 1861; officer's cook, June 5, 1861.

Nicholas Allen, landsman, May 6-June 4, 1861; officer's steward, June 5, 1861; deserted at Surinam, August 30, 1861. [2]

Richard Fielder Armstrong, midshipman, April 19, 1861; born in Georgia; also served aboard CSS Alabama; died in 1904 at Halifax, Nova Scotia. [3] & [6]

Thomas Barker, landsman, May 30, 1861.

Melville P. Beaufort, sailmaker, April 19, 1861; later served aboard CSS Savannah and CSS Sampson. [3]

Charles Bell, first class boy, May 31, 1861.

William Boyle, private, CSMC, May 7, 1861.

Joseph Britton, first class fireman, May 27, 1861.

William P. Brooks, second assistant engineer, May 16, 1861; born in Louisiana (shown elsewhere as Georgia); later served aboard CSS Alabama and CSS Stonewall. [3] & [6]

John Bryan, private, CSMC, May 9-July 7, 1861; part of prize crew assigned to the captured vessel Cuba in July, 1861; probably deserted July 7. [7]

Thomas Burnett, ordinary seaman, May 10, 1861.

John Burns, ordinary seaman, June 7-August 7, 1861; coal heaver, August 8, 1861.

Robert T. Chapman, lieutenant, April 2, 1861; born Alabama. [3]

Thomas Cleary, private, CSMC, April 30, 1861.

Bernard Conroy (or Convey, Conway), resident of Boston, Massachusetts; private, CSMC, April 24, 1861; deserted, in company with William Ryan, at Cadiz, January, 1862, by jumping overboard and swimming ashore; reported to the American Consul, where they were provided with money and clothing to take them to Algesiras; later taken to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, aboard the Piscataqua, from where he and Ryan went on to Boston. [8; much additional information also included in an article, titled "The Pirate Sumter", in the New York Daily Tribune, dated Tuesday, May 27, 1862.]

James Cotter, seaman, June 13, 1861.

Fred Creagan, private, CSMC, May 8, 1861.

Thomas C. Cuddy, gunner, April 29, 1861; born in Charleston, South Carolina; later served aboard CSS Alabama; drowned January 14 (shown elsewhere as January 19), 1865, on board blockade runner Lelia. [3] & [6]

Simeon W. Cummings, third assistant engineer, May 20, 1861; born in New York, appointed from Louisiana; later served aboard CSS Alabama; accidentally killed at Saldanha Bay, South Africa, August 3, 1863. [3] & [6]

Patrick Curley, landsman, May 9, 1861.

Frank Curran, coal heaver, May 23-July 1, 1861; first class fireman, July 2, 1861; born Liverpool; also served aboard the CSS Alabama; later appointed Third Assistant Engineer under the name Ernest Mugufferney, and served aboard the CSS Shenandoah. [6]

Ralph Darby, landsman, May 6, 1861; surgeon's steward, May 7, 1861; court-martialed, date and reason unknown.

John Davis, seaman, May 6-June 4, 1861; coxswain, June 5-July 1, 1861; seaman, July 2-July 7, 1861. [possibly the same person named as John Davison, a Scotsman, aged 25, captured by Union authorities aboard the merchant vessel Cuba in July, 1861 - see ORN 2, 1, 373.]

George Dobson, seaman, to June 13, 1861; quartermaster, June 14, 1861.

Patrick Dougherty, fireman, May 21, 1861.

George Downing (first name also shown as John, resident of Danbury, Connecticut; ordinary seaman, May 20, 1861; deserted at Cadiz, date unknown. [Additional information also included in an article, titled "The Pirate Sumter", in the New York Daily Tribune, dated Tuesday, May 27, 1862.]

Frank Drake, landsman, May 9, 1861; master at arms, May 10, 1861.

Owen Duffy, coal heaver, May 22, 1861; born Ireland; later served aboard the CSS Alabama. [6]

John Dunlee, private, CSMC, May 7-July 7, 1861; assigned as part of the prize crew to captured vessel Cuba, July, 1861; deserted or deceased after July 7. [7]

William Emmerson, seaman, May 16-June 4, 1861; quarter gunner, June 5-July 27, 1861.

David Evans, ordinary seaman, May 11-July 26, 1861.

William E. Evans, lieutenant, March 28, 1861; born in South Carolina. [3]

John Farrell, ordinary seaman, May 7-July 27, 1861.

James Flemming, ordinary seaman, May 20, 1861.

George Forrest, seaman, May 6, 1861; court-martialed, date and reason unknown; later captured by the CSS Alabama, aboard the Dunkirk, October 8, 1862, and recognized as a deserter from the CSS Sumter, he was dishonorably discharged at Blanquilla, on November 26, 1862. [6]

William M. Forrestal, seaman, May 8-June 30, 1861; coxswain, July 1, 1861.

John Fredericks, boy, May 10, 1861.

Miles J. Freeman, first assistant engineer, May 16, 1861; born Wales and resided in New Orleans, Louisiana (other sources show born in Louisiana); later served aboard CSS Alabama; captured after the engagement with the USS Kearsarge, off Cherbourg, France, he was held at Fort Warren in Boston Harbor until the end of the war. [3] & [6]

Francis Land Galt, surgeon, April 18, 1861; born Norfolk, Virginia; died at Upperville, Virginia, on November 17, 1915. [3] & [6]

Richard Gilbert, ordinary seaman, May 13, 1861.

James Graham, fireman, May 18, 1861.

John Griffin, seaman, August 5, 1861.

Henry Hainsworth, boy, May 7, 1861.

John Halligan, landsman, May 18-July 31, 1861; officer's cook, August 1, 1861.

Thomas Hambly, ordinary seaman, May 10-July 27, 1861.

Joseph Heasalton, ordinary seaman, May 9-July 27, 1861.

John Hickey, ordinary seaman, May 13, 1861.

William Anderson Hicks, midshipman, April 22, 1861; appointed from Mississippi; died April 30, 1862. [3]

Samuel Higgins, coal heaver, May 22, 1861.

Thomas R. Hiley, seaman, May 10-June 4, 1861; boatswain's mate, June 5, 1861.

William Hilliard, ordinary seaman, May 8-July 18, 1861; landsman, July 19, 1861.

John F. Holden, midshipman, April 15, 1861; drowned May 17, 1861. [3]

James Horan, seaman, May 6-June 4, 1861; coxswain, June 5, 1861.

John Howard, seaman, May 6-June 4, 1861; quarter gunner, June 5, 1861.

Becket K. Howell, first lieutenant, CSMC, April 2, 1861; born in Mississippi (another source shows Louisiana), appointed from Louisiana; later served aboard CSS Alabama. [3] & [6]

Albert Gallatin Hudgins, midshipman, April 15, 1861; born in Virginia; captured and incarcerated at Fort Lafayette, in early 1862. [3; see also the War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Armies, Series 2, Volume 3.]

William Hudson, resident of Syracuse, New York; corporal, CSMC, June 4, 1861; deserted at Cadiz, January, 1862. [8; additional information also included in an article, titled "The Pirate Sumter", in the New York Daily Tribune, dated Tuesday, May 27, 1862.]

James Hughes, landsman, May 9, 1861; carpenter's mate, May 10, 1861.

Samuel W. Hutchinson, paymaster's clerk, May 1, 1861.

John J. Jenkins, seaman, May 7-June 4, 1861; ship's cook, June 5, 1861; resident of Cape Cod; deserted at Gibraltar, February, 1862. [11]

Thomas Johnson, ordinary seaman, May 7-July 27, 1861.

Frank Kamp, boy, May 8, 1861.

John McIntosh Kell, Lieutenant, April 6, 1861; born 1823 in Georgia; died on October 5, 1900; buried Laurel Grove, Georgia. [3] & [6]

Edward Lee, landsman, June 1, 1861; officer's steward, June 2, 1861; deserted at Surinam, August 30, 1861. [2]

David Legget, ordinary seaman, July 6, 1861.

Charles H. Longman, boy, May 8, 1861.

Albert Louis, landsman, June 13-July 27, 1861.

Robert Maghan, seaman, May 7-June 4, 1861; quartermaster, June 5, 1861.

Michael Malloy, seaman, May 7, 1861.

William May, ordinary seaman, June 4-July 26, 1861.

Benjamin P. McCaskey, boatswain, May 8, 1861; born in Louisiana; later served aboard CSS Alabama; captured in the engagement with the USS Kearsarge, off Cherbourg, France, and incarcerated at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, until the end of the war. [3] & [6]

Mick McCoy, private, CSMC, May 2, 1861.

William M. McDonald, seaman, May 8, 1861.

Edwin McKeever, private, CSMC, April 25, 1861.

William F. McKensie, seaman, May 7, 1861.

Charles Merkins, ordinary seaman, May 8-June 30, 1861; ship's steward, July 1, 1861.

Charles Miller, ordinary seaman, May 9-June 17, 1861; seaman, June 18, 1861.

Joseph Miller, landsman, May 24, 1861.

Thomas Moore, served as boy aboard the CSS Sumter; joined the cruiser at the age of 15, May 6, 1861; after the cruiser was disbanded and sold at Gibraltar, Moore made his way to London, and then to Australia, "as special messenger for the English government"; remained in Australia for two years, then went to New Orleans, where he arrived just after the close of the war; resident of Galveston, Texas, in 1890, and, with Melville P. Beaufort, were the only survivors of the Sumter's crew, in the state of Texas, at that time. [CSS Sumter Muster Roll; Galveston Daily News (Houston, Texas) dated August 4, 1890, page 8.]

Fred Morton, private, CSMC, May 7, 1861.

Stephen Mullen, ordinary seaman, May 15, 1861.

Thomas Murphy, first class fireman, May 22, 1861; born Ireland; later served aboard the CSS Alabama. [6]

Henry Myers, paymaster, April 1, 1861; born in Georgia. [3]

Matthew O'Brien, third assistant engineer, May 20, 1861; born in Ireland, appointed from Louisiana; later served aboard CSS Alabama and CSS Shenandoah. [3] & [6]

William Oliver, seaman, May 6-June 4, 1861; boatswain's mate, June 5, 1861.

John Orr, ordinary seaman, May 8, 1861; deserted at Curacao, July 24, 1861. [5]

James Palmer, coal heaver, July 28-August 7, 1861; ordinary seaman, August 8, 1861.

Thomas F. Penny, resident of Rondout, New York; ordinary seaman, June 12, 1861; deserted at Gibraltar, February, 1862, and shipped on the London; last heard of in England. [11; much additional information also included in an article, titled "The Pirate Sumter", in the New York Daily Tribune, dated Tuesday, May 27, 1862.]

Thomas Pratt, seaman, May 7-June 4, 1861; captain of the hold, June 5, 1861.

Patrick Rafferty, fireman, May 18-July 1, 1861; landsman, July 2, 1861.

William Robinson, carpenter, May 7, 1861; born in Boston, Massachusetts and appointed from Lousiana; later served aboard CSS Alabama, where he was mortally wounded in action against the USS Kearsarge, June 19, 1864, and subsequently died of his wounds. [3] & [6]

Eugene Ruhl, seaman, May 8-June 16, 1861; quartermaster, June 17-July 26, 1861.

William Ryan, originally a resident of Newburg, New York; pre-war employment aboard the steamer Nebraska, running between St. Louis and New Orleans; enlisted as a private, Confederate States Marine Corps, May 8 or 9, 1861, at New Orleans, and quartered on the receiving ship, Star of the West; deserted, in company with Bernard Conway, at Cadiz, January, 1862, by jumping overboard and swimming ashore; after his desertion, he returned to the United States aboard the vessel Piscataqua, arriving in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, about May, 1862, from where Ryan walked to Boston, and then was supplied with funds to return home to Newburg. [8; much additional information also included in an article, titled "The Pirate Sumter", in the New York Daily Tribune, dated Tuesday, May 27, 1862.]

Everett Sammon [surname also shown as Salmon, seaman, May 7-June 4, 1861; captain of the top, June 5, 1861; resident of New York; deserted at Gibraltar, February, 1862. [11]

William H. Saunders, landsman, May 28-June 4, 1861; officer's cook, June 5-June 30, 1861; landsman, July 1, 1861.

Raphael Semmes, commander, April 9, 1861; born Maryland and resided in Mobile, Alabama; later commanded CSS Alabama; died in Mobile, August 30, 1877. [3] & [6]

William Sharkey, seaman, May 6-June 4, 1861; captain of forecastle, June 5-September 3, 1861.

James Smith, private, CSMC, April 29, 1861.

John Smith, seaman, shipped at Curacoa, July 24, 1861 and deserted at Trinidad on August 5, 1861. [4]

William Breedlove Smith, captain's clerk, May 1, 1861; born in Louisiana; later served aboard CSS Alabama, and as paymaster, CSS Shenandoah. [3] & [6]

Henry Spencer, seaman; born England, aged 38 in 1861; May 8-July 7, 1861; captured (aboard the Cuba) and incarcerated at Fort Lafayette, in early 1862. [See the War of the Rebellion: Official Records of the Armies, Series 2, Volume 3; also ORN 2, 1, 373.]

George Stapleton, first class fireman, June 4, 1861.

William Starkey, seaman, May 6, 1861 (possibly the same person listed above as William Sharkey).

George Stephenson, corporal, CSMC, April 25, 1861; promoted to Sergeant, and left aboard the CSS Sumter when she was laid up at Gibraltar; after the arrest of Hester for the murder of Midshipman Andrews (see CSN Trivia page), Stephenson was placed temporarily in command of the vessel; later served aboard the CSS Georgia, then at Drewry's Bluff, Virginia, and surrendered with the Naval Brigade under Semmes at Greensboro, North Carolina, April 26, 1865. [9]

John M. Stribling, lieutenant, March 29, 1861; appointed from South Carolina; died September 12, 1862, aboard the CSS Florida. [3]

H.J. Thomason, sergeant, CSMC, June 6, 1861.

Peter Thompson, seaman, May 7-July 26, 1861.

Patrick Tobin, private, CSMC, April 30, 1861.

Benton Vanoken (or Vanauken), private, CSMC, May 9, 1861.

William Wallace, private, CSMC, May 2, 1861.

George A. Whipple, ordinary seaman, May 21, 1861; native of Massachusetts; deserted at Gibraltar in early 1862; later joined the Union Navy and served aboard the USS Kearsarge. [10]

James Wilson, private, CSMC, April 26, 1861.

Joseph David Wilson, midshipman, April 23, 1861; born in Florida; later served as Third Lieutenant aboard CSS Alabama, and commanded CSS Hampton, in 1865. [3] & [6]

Richard Wilson, private, CSMC, April 24, 1861.


An article, titled "The Pirate Sumter", in the New York Daily Tribune, dated Tuesday, May 27, 1862, names John Molligan, a resident of Troy, New York, as also being a member of the CSS Sumter, who also deserted at Cadiz, in January, 1862, and later shipped on a vessel bound for Callao. However, this may in fact be John Halligan.


Notes:

[1] See the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Volume 2, pages 569-570.

[2] See reports of Commander Semmes in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, Series 1, Volume 1, pages 634 and 706-707.

[3] Details from the Register of Officers of the Confederate States Navy, 1861-1865, J.M. Carroll & Company reprint, 1983, Mattituck, New York.

[4] See the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, Series 1, Volume 1, page 633.

[5] See the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, Series 1, Volume 1, page 632.

[6] Additional information included in the roster in William Marvel's publication The Alabama and the Kearsarge: the Sailor's Civil War.

[7] Information supplied courtesy of David M. Sullivan, Rutland, Massachusetts; see also Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, Series 2, Volume 1, pages 373-374.

[8] Information supplied courtesy of David M. Sullivan, Rutland, Massachusetts; see also the Boston Journal of May 24, 1862, and the Augusta Daily Chronicle and Sentinel of June 12, 1862.

[9] Information supplied courtesy of David M. Sullivan, Rutland, Massachusetts.

[10] See ORN, Series 1, Volume 1, page 744.

[11] Information from The Case of Great Britain as Laid Before the Tribunal of Arbitration: convened at Geneva under the Provisions of the Treaty Between the United States of America and Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain, concluded at Washington, May 8, 1871, volume 2, pages 48 - 49; published 1872 at Washington, D.C., Government Printing Office.




Copyright, Terry Foenander

(Updated January, 2008.)