Here is a description of fringes done on the KM by Natalie Langkilde http://www.nataliesknitting.com

Last updated March 2, '04

Published in part on the Carolina Machine Knitting Guild's Newsletter April, '04

(See photo's and directions below)

Not included, but lovely is Charlene's site for a twisted fringe http://charmknits.com/fringe.htm

And another beautiful twisted fringe version at Goodey's Knitting Room http://goodeys.tripod.com/goodeysknittingroom/id38.html

Many edges are made by picking up a few stitches at a time, and knitted a couple, or a few rows. So why not put some stitches out to catch the fringe? They could all be left loopy, or cut, as well. They could be knotted like the hand tied fringes for a different look. Some Machine Fringes are picky work, but are still faster than wrapping, cutting, and hand knotting a fringe.

Here is how:
Leave a needle out past the knitting "in work". Leave the stitches between this needle and the work "out of work".

Here is an example:
XX= needles in work --- = needles out of work Make the fringe length any length you want by using farther or closer needles to catch the fringe.
(fringe catcher needles) XX---------XXXXXXX(knitting)XXXXXXX ---------XX (fringe catcher needles)

Remember is that sometimes you need to pull out the needles to the farthest position for the first few rows to make sure the fringing needles catches the yarn and knits. Unravel these fringes when you take it all off the machine. Or use it as a handy edge holder to unroll your edge as you block your fringe Then you can use the last knit st as a cutting guide. Cut if you want for loose fringes, or leave looped.

Handy hint: A kitchen fork combed out the fringes while blocking the swatches quite nicely. A multi-prong knitting tool, or cast on comb would also help. The fork, however, won't melt and keeps you hand away from the steam.

Knitted on Fringe (wrong side facing you):

Author Unknown

from Http://Charmknits.com , "Crochet Like Trims".
Knitted with the wrong side of fabric facing you as you pick up stitches to make each fringe. It doesn't take as much yarn as many of the fringes. You can use one or 2 strands at a time. You control where this goes because you pick up the each stitch. It could go along an edge, or even across the knit.

Directions:
Use a double strand of yarn through out, bring 1st ndl to work position. Then bring a 2nd ndl to work position leaving several nds out of work to give length to the fringe. I used ndls #1 and #10. COR, pick up corner loop from fabric with wrong side facing you and hang on ndl #1. Knit the double strand of yarn through ndl #1 and e-wrap ndl #10 with it. K 2 rws and pick up the next fabric st and hang on ndl #1 which is opposite the carriage. K 2 rws. Continue until all fabric sts are picked up. K 1 rw to left and fasten off ndl #1. Drop ndl #10 and unravel to form loops of fringe.

Knitted on Fringe (right side facing you):

Author Unknown

This is from http://Charmknits.com, "Crochet like trims".
I used a double strand on this one. And only a single strand on Charmknits.com site. I changed the directions to hang this with right side of fabric facing me.

This takes less yarn than most of the knitted fringes. You can use 2 or one strand. It's addicting, and doesn't go as slow as you might think. (On a poncho or blanket there is miles of edge!)
I wouldn't rule this out on the poncho or a blanket. I rather like it! You control where you put this
edging after you knit whatever it is you want to edge. It could be just on the edge, but doesn't have to be!

Directions:
Use a double strand of yarn through out, bring 1st ndl to work position. Then bring a 2nd ndl to work position leaving several nds out of work to give length to the fringe. I used ndls #1 and #10. COR, pick up corner loop from fabric with right side facing you and hang on ndl #1. Knit the double strand of yarn through ndl #1 and e-wrap ndl #10 with it. K 2 rws and pick up the next fabric st and hang on ndl #1 which is opposite the carriage. K 2 rws. Continue until all fabric sts are picked up. K 1 rw to left and fasten off ndl #1. Drop ndl #10 and unravel to form loops of fringe.

Tuck Fringe:

Author Maggie Andrews http://www.maggieandrews.supanet.com/

This has the same look on the opposite side! Very formal, very lush! Sewn on after you
make it. You could even cut it in half and use both separately; made in the time it took to
do one. This looks like a store bought trim! I love it! It wouldn't have to go on the edge, either. Before you fold it over to encase the edge it looks quite interesting. I am sure it could be used "open" in some way, too.

It went quick, but sewing it on by hand was a pain. I would sew it on the sewing machine,
next time. The tucked part (band) looks like ribbing. The fringe is thick and could be cut
or, left the way it is. I love this one! It is the one that takes the most yarn, though. If you're hurting for yarn, then do another one.

Maggie's Directions:
"This one has to be sewn on afterwards though.
Use basic card / pattern 1
OXOXOXOXOXOXOXOX
XOXOXOXOXOXOXOXO
Cast on 4 stitches at left. Leave empty needles for double the length of fringe required. Cast on 4 stitches at right.

1111--------------------------------------------------1111

Knit tuck stitch. You will have twice as many strands in the fringe. It will fold in half along the strands and can be left looped or cut. Looks good either way. Gives solid binding edge to enclose garment piece. Stops rolling. This is a super edging for cushions [pillows]. Happy knitting"
Maggie Andrews in Essex, England.
Designer and Author of books and leaflets for Machine knitters. Go check out her terriffic stuff! http://www.maggieandrews.supanet.com/

This is the Automatic Fringe, cabled:

Author Unknown

I twisted the ends of the knitting with the 2 prong tool to make a cable. It seems a little more stable than the automatic fringe , but it's still not my favorite. It was more work to twist every 5-10 rows. I could have spent that much time making another fringe that was more stable. The Wooly Worm has a relief effect that's much more noticeable with less work. But!! It is a
different look!

Directions:
Leave a needle in work past the main garment, with needles left out of work between.
Eg: X-----------XXXXXXXXX------------X
The space between (out of work needles) is as long as you want your fringe. Knit 5 rows, use the2 prong tool and twist the cable. Knit 5 more rows, then twist again. Continue in pattern of twists every 5 rows until work is long enough.

Automatic Fringe, knotted:

Author Unknown

This makes a fringe as you knit. But, you can't control where you want the fringe. It's going to fringe on the edge, and that's all! Then knot the fringe with a few strands in each knot. Pulling the knot up to the knitted edge with a needle, or your prong tool stuck in the hole of the knot. I liked this. It looks exactly like the hand knotted fringe with half time and work.

Directions: Leave a needle outside of your main knitting in work. Empty needles out of work between this needle and your main knitting. Eg: X---------------XXXXXXX-------------X

Automatic Fringe:

Author Unknown

It makes a fringe as you knit with that needle off to the side of your garment stitches. This is fast, efficient, and uses the least amount of materials. I disliked that it wasn't stable. Washing, wearing, or playing with the fringe can unravel the rows.

It could be done for something like a placemat that you sew a seam over the edge for and be very useful. It was not something that gave you control over where the fringe goes. It is going on the edges, and that's it! So for the ponchos, or other garments you won't be able to fringe all sides this way.

Alternatives to the unstableness would be to take a separate thread or yarn and e-wrapping the last needle in work each row with the main body of knitting. The one before the fringe, not the fringe needle. This would be a bunch more work. The other alternative is to twist it into a cable on the end of your knitting. Or, to knot it.

Directions:
You leave a needle in work spaces out from your knitting with no needles in work
between. Then knit away.
Eg: X------------XXXXXXXX----------X

Wooly worm:

Author Cathy Sanders http://www.northtipton.com/freepats.htm "Cathie's Free Patterns": "The Sure fire Last Minute Scarf"

This looks much better than my swatch shows! Especially nice with long fringe.
Find this at: http://www.northtipton.com/ "Cathie's Free Patterns": "The Sure fire Last Minute Scarf"

I like this one! It's lush, with the worm interest making something that looks cool and
isn't too slow! Not as much yarn used as the Tuck Fringe, and when you pull it off the needles, it's done! So it's practical, not too much time involved, either. It's done after the knitting, so you put it directly where you want it to go. I have an old scarf done with this, and it's been washed and worn many times. No change in quality, apparently very stable!

It does have a tendency to lay in one direction, so you must know which side of the
knitting you want it to face. It could go on the edges, but you could even go across the fabric any direction you decide to go with it! I put it down an arm seam and I liked it. It could be done to make a design with fringe around it. Like a flower if done in the shape of one.

Directions:
Pull out needles L20-21-22 and R20-21-22.
Eg:XXX-----------XXX

Using the three-prong tool, wrong side facing you, hang the first 3 stitches on one end on the Left 3 needles. E-wrap the 3 Right needles with 1 strand of 2/24 and thread carriage. Knit 6 rows. Hang 3 more stitches on the same Left needles and knit 6 more rows. Continue until you get to the last 3 stitches. Knit 4 rows. Transfer L20 and L22 to L21. Knit one row. Bind off. Using a pair of sharp scissors, carefully trim off the edge made by needles on the right. The fringe you have left is now all the same length.

Crab Stitch Fringe

Author Copyright © Natalie Langkilde 2004 All rights reserved unless permission from the author nammyl@charter.net

This is a variation of the crochet like trim crab stitch found on Charlene's web site:
http://www.charmknits.com/crochet-like-trims.htm
It was a little bit of work; more than the other crochet like trims. It is done after your article is made, so it could go anywhere you want it. It's the same on the other side! Maybe even more nice! This would be a great choice for something that needed to be sturdy, flat, and reversible such as a baby blanket.

The reason for the time it takes to do it is that the fringe needle must travel over a stitch every 2 rows to follow along with the transfer that makes the crab like twist. As the trim needles move over one to the left, so must the fringe, unless you are making the fring longer and longer each 2 rows. Now if you were really lazy, and didn't care about wasted yarn…. Then just let it get longer and longer and cut it straight after! Or have a slanted fringe when your done… that's not out of the question! This wasn't so bad to do, because it looked so nice when done. It's extremely stable when your finished. Those fringes aren't going anywhere!

Directions:
The base st for and crab st: To make the base st, begin with the right side of the garment facing you, working from R to L, pick up the first full fabric st and hang on a ndl. K 2 rws. Pick up bump under st and hang on ndl to the R of the ndl. K 2 rws. Two ndls are now in work and a base st is finished.

Now put a needle in work 10 or more stitches over on the right side, with needles out of work between that and the first 2 stitches. This is as long as your fringe will be.
Eg: XX-----------X

With a single prong tool, pick up next fabric st and hang on new ndl to the L of the L ndl. Transfer R st to new L ndl and put empty ndl out of work (A) position. (Original L ndl becomes R ndl.) Move needle in work outside of garment (The fringe making needle) over one stitch to the left. K 2 rws. Keeping fringe the same spacing as before.

Repeat until last fabric st remains. To end, hang last fabric st on L ndl and transfer st on R ndl to L ndl. K 1 rw. Cut yarn, and pull through. Loosen and unravel the fringe stitches.

Rolled Edge, or Piping Fringe

Author Copyright © Natalie Langkilde 2004 All rights reserved unless permission from the author nammyl@charter.net

This is a variation I made up from a trim found on Charlene's web site:
http://www.charmknits.com/crochet-like-trims.htm

You can this, as well, at my sock pattern page on top of a kids sock. http://webpages.charter.net/langkilde/Preschool%20Toe%20Up%20Sock%20Pattern.html

For the sock I doubled the fringe by e-wrapping the fringing needle on the left to right pass of the carrage.


It is done after the article is made and put on exactly where you want it to go. It wouldn't even have to be on the edge. Wouldn't this look cute on a pocket, around a neck, a sock top, or a sleeve edge? On a children's sweater? I can see a kids sweater with this done in wiggly lines across it, or made into a design. A flower? It could be.

E-wrap CO 4 sts COR. Set carriage to knit to the L only (R part button on). With right side facing you and beginning on the right end of the fabric * pick up one whole st and hang on ndl opposite the carriage. K 2 rws. *

Put a needle in work 10 or more needles out to the right. Needles between this and the 4 stitches should be out of work. This is the fringe length.
Eg: XXXX--------------X

Repeat * to * until last fabric st is hung. Take sts off on latch tool and pull yarn through to secure. If cord is too tight, loosen tension. If cord is too loose, tighten tension. Unravel the fringe stitches.

Double Crochet Fringe

Author Copyright © Natalie Langkilde 2004 All rights reserved unless permission from the author nammyl@charter.net

This is a variation I made up from the crochet like trim found on Charlene's web site:
http://www.charmknits.com/crochet-like-trims.htm

This looks a little like a rib band on the back side. Not unlike Maggie Andrew's Tuck fringe This is done after your article is knit. It is a little more time consuming because 2 stitches must transfer over one needle each row. But the fringe stitch can stay put. I like it so much I'd do it again. You better get yourself a snack and coffee if you plan to do a whole bunch of this! It's very stable after it's done. Also, it lays flat. This would be a great choice for something that needed to be sturdy, flat, and reversible such as a baby blanket.

Directions:
E-wrap CO 5 sts. COR number ndls 1-2-3-4-5- with ndl #5 being the one next to the carriage. With the right side facing you and beginning on the right end of fabric, * pick up one whole st and hang on ndl #1. K 2 rws.

Put a needle 10 or more needles to the right in work. Leaving the needles between this and the first 5 stitches out of work. This is as long as the fringe will be.
EG: XXXXX--------------------X

With EON tool (not needed in order to do the trim, but it does help you go faster) move st #3 to ndl #5 and st #1 to ndl #3. Then pick up next fabric st and hang on empty ndl #1. K 2 rws. * Repeat * to * until last fabric st is hung. Bind off around the gate pegs. Unravel fringe stitches.

 

Half Double Crochet Fringe

Author Copyright © Natalie Langkilde 2004 All rights reserved unless permission from the author nammyl@charter.net

This is a variation of a crochet like trim I made up from a trim on Charlene's web site:
http://www.charmknits.com/crochet-like-trims.htm

It is very stable after it's done. It looks a little like a ribbed band on the back side. Not unlike Maggie Andrew's tuck fringe. It takes some extra time because you must transfer a stitch over one needle each 2 rows. It's a flat trim once you have made it. You put it exactly where you want it after your article is made. Nice! This would be a great choice for something that needed to be sturdy, flat, and reversible such as a baby blanket.

Directions:
E-wrap CO 3 sts. COR number ndls 1-2-3- with ndl #3 being the one next to the carriage. With the right side facing you and beginning on the right end of the fabric * pick up one whole st and hang on ndl #1. K 2 rws. With one prong tool transfer st #1 to ndl #3. Then pick up next fabric st and hang on empty ndl #1. K 2 rws. *

Put a needle in work 10 or more stitches to the right in work. Leave the needles between this, and the 3 first needles out of work. This is your fringe.
Eg: XXX--------------------X

Repeat * to * until last fabric st is hung then bind off around gate pegs. Unravel fringe stitches.

Mock Cable Fringe

Author Copyright © Natalie Langkilde 2004 All rights reserved unless permission from the author nammyl@charter.net

This is similar to the "Mock Cable" of Maggie Andrew's in her stunning Aran sweater patterns, (http://www.maggieandrews.supanet.com/) only it's done on the edge with a fringe attached. This will be 2 rows of "The Worm". Done after your article is made. Not as confusing as it looks, twice the work because you have to do 2 edging rows. But isn't it nice? Maybe it's worth it for some things.

Directions:
Do the "wooly worm" (see below) on the edge stitches. Find this at: http://www.northtipton.com/ "Cathie's Free Patterns": "The Sure fire Last Minute Scarf" Wrong side facing you. Working from RIGHT side of fabric to the LEFT.

Turn the fabric around to right side facing you. Pick up stitches 3 stitches up fabric. Hang these and do the "worm" (see below) working from LEFT side of the fabric to the RIGHT. This makes the other half of the mock cable.

Wooly Worm: Pull out needles L20-21-22 and R20-21-22. Using the three-prong tool, wrong side facing you, hang the first 3 stitches on one end on the Left 3 needles. E-wrap the 3 Right needles with 1 strand of 2/24 and thread carriage. Knit 6 rows. Hang 3 more stitches on the same Left needles and knit 6 more rows. Continue until you get to the last 3 stitches. Knit 4 rows. Transfer L20 and L22 to L21. Knit one row. Bind off. Using a pair of sharp scissors, carefully trim off the edge made by needles on the right. The fringe you have left is now all the same length.

The worm (author unknown) : pick up 3 stitches with the 3 prong tool and hang on 3 needles. Knit 6 rows over these needles. * Pick up the next 3 stitches and hang them over the first 3 stitches on the same needles. Knit 6 rows*. Continue in this manner from * to * until you have gone across fabric.

Rope Fringe

Author Copyright © Natalie Langkilde 2004 All rights reserved unless permission from the author nammyl@charter.net

This is similar to Maggie Andrew's "Mock Cables" techniques in her beautiful Aran sweater patterns. http://www.maggieandrews.supanet.com/ Although this is done on the edge, with an attached fringe. This will be 2 rows of "The worm". Not as confusing as it looks, twice the work because you have to do 2 edging rows. But isn't it nice? Maybe it's worth it for some things. You put it on after your article is made.

Directions:
Do the "wooly worm" (See instructions below) on the edge stitches. Find this at: http://www.northtipton.com/ "Cathie's Free Patterns": "The Sure fire Last Minute Scarf" Working on the wrong side of the fabric working from the RIGHT to the LEFT. Turn fabric around to right side.Do the "worm" (see instructions below). Pick up the same edge stitches that you picked up for the worm, but work from the RIGHT to the LEFT side of the fabric.

Wooly Worm: Pull out needles L20-21-22 and R20-21-22. Using the three-prong tool, wrong side facing you, hang the first 3 stitches on one end on the Left 3 needles. E-wrap the 3 Right needles with 1 strand of 2/24 and thread carriage. Knit 6 rows. Hang 3 more stitches on the same Left needles and knit 6 more rows. Continue until you get to the last 3 stitches. Knit 4 rows. Transfer L20 and L22 to L21. Knit one row. Bind off. Using a pair of sharp scissors, carefully trim off the edge made by needles on the right. The fringe you have left is now all the same length.

The worm (author unknown): pick up 3 stitches with the 3 prong tool and hang on 3 needles. Knit 6 rows over these needles. * Pick up the next 3 stitches and hang them over the first 3 stitches on the same needles. Knit 6 rows*. Continue in this manner from * to * until you have gone across fabric.