Award for Extraordinary Scientific Achievement
1951
Hurd Curtis Willett   "for his contributions to synoptic meteorology, and in particular to our understanding of the large-scale circulation patterns of the atmosphere."
1953
Carl-Gustaf Arvid Rossby   "for his contributions to dynamic meteorology leading to a better understanding of atmospheric motions and thermodynamics."
1955
Jerome Namias   "for his contributions to, and stimulation of, research in the principles and application of extended and long-range forecasting techniques."
1956
John von Neumann   "for his farsighted contribution to the science of meteorology and the national interests in developing the modern, high-speed electronic computer with meteorological application as an ultimate aim, and for his support and encouragement in organizing the world's first research group in numerical weather prediction."
The Carl-Gustaf Rossby Award for Extraordinary Scientific Achievement (Until 1958, designated as Award for Extraordinary Scientific Achievement)
1960
J. Bjerknes and Erik Palmén   "for their pioneering and distinguished research contributions in atmospheric dynamics and synoptic aerology, which have given a unified picture of the general circulation of the atmosphere."
1961
Victor P. Starr   "for his more than a decade of outstanding fundamental research leading to a better understanding of the general circulation of the atmosphere."
1962
Bernhard Haurwitz   "for the substantial advanes due to his research in dynamic meteorology over a wide range of subjects, including among many the long waves in the westerlies, the circulation of the high atmosphere, local and diurnal effects, and hurricanes."
1963
Harry Wexler, posthumously   "for his contributions to knowledge of the atmosphere heat balance and dynamic anticyclogenesis, for his interdisciplinary studies in meteorology, oceanography, and glaciology, and for his outstanding leadership in international programs in the atmospheric sciences."
The Carl-Gustaf Rossby Research Medal (Until 1963, designated as The Carl-Gustaf Rossby Award for Extraordinary Scientific Achievement)
1964
Jule G. Charney   "for his long and distinguished record of outstanding contributions to theoretical meteorology and related atmospheric sciences. Apart from acting as a strong scientific stimulus to the development of dynamical weather prediction, Professor Charney's research has led the way to a more fundamental understanding of the atmosphere's general circulation, hydrodynamical instability, the structure of hurricanes, the dynamics of ocean currents, the propagation of wave energy, and many other aspects of geophysical fluid mechanics. In its scientific depth and breadth, Professor Charney's work has contributed significantly to the study of meteorology as an exact science."
1965
Arnt Eliassen   "for his many important contributions to dynamical meteorology, through which he has brought a new elegance and clarity into the subject. Noteworthy among these are his research on free and thermally driven circulations, on numerical weather prediction, on frontogenesis, and on shear and gravitational–acoustic wave propagation in stratified media."
1966
Zdenek Sekera   "for his numerous contributions to the dynamics of the atmosphere, which comprise studies of waves at interfaces, of the dynamics of the atmospheric jet stream, and especially of the brightness and polarization of sky light in a scattering atmosphere which led to the extension and application of Chandrasekhar's general theory of radiative transfer to atmospheric problems. This work led to the computation of tables by Sekera and his coworkers. With the publication of these tables, in Chandrasekhar's words, 'The problem that was formulated by Rayleigh in 1871 has now at last found its complete solution.'"
1967
Dave Fultz   "for his outstanding and pioneering research over the past 20 years, which has resulted in laboratory experimental techniques in dynamic meteorology. Through example and personal instruction, these techniques have been the root of nearly all of the modeling studies of the general circulation that have been carried out to date."
1968
Verner E. Suomi   "for his imagination, ingenuity, and versatility in conceiving and designing diverse meteorological sensors which have helped to transform the satellite as a meteorological probe from a dream to a reality. His Spin-Scan camera has given us our most comprehensive views of the atmosphere as an entity, and has already led to revised ideas concerning the circulation in lower latitudes."
1969
Edward N. Lorenz   "for his fundamental innovations in dynamic meteorology and his enlightening perspectives in advancing our understanding of the atmosphere as a physical system."
1970
Hsiao-Lan Kuo   "for his fundamental research in atmospheric dynamics, beginning with his thesis on the stability of barotropic flow and continuing on the general circulation, the theory of hurricane formation, thermal convection, interaction of the atmosphere with the earth's surface, and on many other topics of great importance."
1971
Norman A. Phillips   "for his introduction of new lines of study which have served to enlarge the scope of dynamic meteorology, his construction of a two-layer model making numerical prediction of developing systems feasible, and his diagnosis of nonlinear instability and prescription for dealing with it, permitting numerical simulation of the general circulation, which he had previously pioneered to be extended to infinite range."
1972
Joseph Smagorinsky   "for his creative leadership in numerical modeling of the general circulation of the atmosphere."
1973
Christian E. Junge   "for his productive investigations and international leadership in the study of atmospheric aerosols and atmospheric chemistry that have increased our knowledge of the stratospheric sulphate layer, the background tropospheric aerosol, the intricacies of marine aerosol distribution, and other topics important to the chemical budgets of the atmosphere."
1974
Heinz H. Lettau   "for his outstanding research achievements leading to a fuller understanding of the atmosphere's first mile. From his original concept of the stability length scale to his pioneering contributions in boundary-layer dynamics, turbulent transfer, climatology, and microscale surface modification, his work has been characterized by remarkable ingenuity and extraordinary dedication to purpose."
1975
Charles H. B. Priestley   "for his fundamental contributions to the understanding of turbulent processes and the links between small-scale and large-scale dynamics in the atmosphere."
1976
Hans A. Panofsky   "for his many fundamental contributions to the understanding of turbulent processes and the links between small-scale and large-scale dynamics in the atmosphere."
1977
Akio Arakawa   "for his formulation of physically realistic methods to incorporate convective clouds and boundary-layer processes into large-scale prediction models of the atmosphere and for his contributions in numerical methods of weather prediction."
1978
James W. Deardorff   "for his imaginative research on the structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer and its applications to prediction models and diffusion."
1979
Herbert Riehl   "for his outstanding analyses of tropical phenomena, ranging from studies of individual clouds, tropical depressions, and hurricanes, to the trade-wind inversion and the Hadley circulation. These studies have greatly advanced our understanding of a major portion of the atmosphere."
1980
Sean A. Twomey   "for extensive contributions to the development of many areas of atmospheric science, including aerosol and cloud physics, radiative transfer, and remote sensing from satellites."
1981
Roscoe R. Braham, Jr.   "for his notable contributions in research and effective leadership in the study of complex convective systems."
1982
Cecil E. Leith, Jr.   "for his fundamental contributions to the theory of statistical hydrodynamics and its application to the assessment of weather and climate predictability."
1983
Joanne Simpson   "for her outstanding contributions to our understanding of convective clouds, and the role of convection in the formation and maintenance of hurricanes and other wind systems over tropical oceans."
1984
Bert R. Bolin   "for his outstanding research enlarging our understanding of the atmosphere and oceans as a milieu, for valuable contributions to the understanding of global geochemical cycles, and for his international leadership in scientific planning of the Global Atmospheric Research Programme."
1985
Tiruvalam N. Krishnamurti   "for fundamental contributions to the understanding of the structure and evolution of the tropical atmosphere, especially the monsoons, and for international leadership in the Global Atmospheric Research Programme."
1986
Douglas K. Lilly   "for sustained contributions and skilled leadership in establishing the scientific foundations of small- and mesoscale meteorology including convection, gravity waves, and boundary layer turbulence."
1987
Michael E. McIntyre   "for his original and innovative works furthering our theoretical and conceptual understanding of the stratosphere."
1988
Brian J. Hoskins   "for numerous major contributions to numerical modeling and to the understanding of atmospheric dynamics."
1989
Richard J. Reed   "for major contributions to our understanding of polar lows, tropical waves, and the tropical lower stratosphere."
1990
Yale Mintz   "for preeminent leadership in the global modeling of climate, and for inspiring tutelage of several generations of scientists."
1991
Kikuro Miyakoda   "for outstanding contributions toward extending the time range of numerical weather prediction to weeks, months, and seasons."
1992
Syukuro Manabe   "for his contributions to the understanding of climate dynamics and his pioneering role in numerical prediction of climate change."
1993
John M. Wallace   "for innovative and consequential contributions to the understanding of large-scale atmospheric circulations."
1994
Jerry D. Mahlman   "for pioneering work in the application of general circulation models to the understanding of stratospheric dynamics and transport."
1995
Chester W. Newton   "for fundamental research contributions in the areas of the structure and dynamics of jet streams, fronts, cyclones, severe storms, and mesoconvective systems; and the behavior of the general circulation of the atmosphere."
1996
David Atlas   "for brilliant and sustained leadership in the field of radar meteorology, for important contributions to cloud physics and mesoscale meteorology, and for inspiring new generations of scientists in these fields."
1997
Robert E. Dickinson   "for his wide-ranging and important contributions to atmospheric dynamics and to earth system science."
1998
Barry Saltzman   "for his lifelong contributions to the study of the global circulation and the evolution of the earth's climate."
1999
Taroh Matsuno   “for fundamental contributions to the theory of waves and wave mean flow interaction in geophysical systems.”
The Second Half Century Award
1970
Rudolph Hanel, Don T. Hilleary, Lewis D. Kaplan, and David Q. Wark   each cited "for his pioneering work in the development of the technique of procuring upper-air soundings from earth-orbiting satellites, culminating in the success of the infrared spectrometers on the Nimbus III satellite, which for the first time has provided data for global analysis of the temperature–pressure structure of the atmosphere."
1972
Richard J. Reed   "under whose leadership significant advances have been made in the understanding of the circulation and structure of midlatitude and tropical atmospheres."
1973
Douglas K. Lilly   "for his theoretical, experimental, and observational contributions to the study of small-scale atmospheric phenomena including thermal convection, mountain waves, and turbulent interactions."
1974
James W. Deardorff   "for his many productive efforts toward furthering our understanding of turbulent processes in the planetary boundary layer through analytical studies and highly original numerial and laboratory experiments."
Tiruvalam N. Krishnamurti   "for his outstanding contributions to the fields of dynamic and synoptic meteorology including his diagnostic and prognostic studies of tropical and midlatitude systems using real input data together with his enlightening analyses of tropical weather systems using satellite and aircraft information in sparse conventional data areas."
1975
Louis J. Battan   "for his many contributions to cloud physics and his objective scientific evaluation of weather modification efforts, his writings fostering public understanding of meteorology, and his great service to the profession in many capacities."
1976
Roger M. Lhermitte   "for many significant contributions to the advancement of radar meteorology through the use of Doppler radar in probing the atmosphere, particularly for the dual-Doppler method, which has provided new insight into the internal motions of convective storms."
1977
Syukuro Manabe   "for his outstanding contributions to the understanding of the influence of radiative processes on the climate through numerical simulation of the dynamics and physics of the atmosphere."
1978
Joost A. Businger   "for his definitive analysis of atmospheric surface-layer properties and his leadership in the field of boundary layer research."
1979
J. Murray Mitchell, Jr.   "for his broad fundamental contributions to the study of climate and climate change, ranging in scope from ice ages to the effects of urbanization."
1980
André J. Robert and Frederick G. Shuman   "for scientific leadership in the construction of different and original operational primitive equations models that produced significant benefits to Canadian and U.S. weather services."
1981
Charles D. Keeling   "for his fundamental and far-reaching work on the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide, which has been the only long-term record of the systematic increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere."
Thomas H. Vonder Haar   "for his leadership as a researcher and as a coordinator of national and international programs in atmospheric radiation and satellite meteorology."
1982
James R. Holton   "for his wide-ranging contributions to dynamic meteorology, especially for his work in stratospheric dynamics that has led to important advances in understanding of stratospheric sudden warmings, stratospheric vacillation, and the quasi-biennial oscillation."
Hans R. Pruppacher   "for his outstanding research in experimental cloud physics, which has provided fundamental data on a wide range of microphysical phenomena essential to the quantitative understanding of clouds and precipitation."
The Jule G. Charney Award (Until 1982, designated as Second Half Century Award)
1983
Francis P. Bretherton   "for his innovative and significant contributions to our understanding of the dynamics of the atmosphere and oceans encompassing a wide variety of scales, processes, and phenomena."
1984
Peter V. Hobbs   "for highly productive theoretical and field investigations of cloud physical processes, aerosol and cloud-water chemistry studies, and for his leadership in organizing and directing the CYCLES Project, which has contributed significantly toward our understanding of the mesoscale structure of midlatitude frontal systems."
1985
Keith A. Browning   "for fundamental contributions to our understanding of severe convective storms, the kinematics of fronts and cyclonic storms, and the methodology of Doppler radar observations."
Richard S. Lindzen   "for incisive contributions to the theory of diverse phenomena ranging from gravitational to planetary waves in the upper and lower atmosphere."
1986
Michio Yanai   "for highly original contributions to enlarging our knowledge of the dynamics of the atmosphere, particularly in the tropics."
1987
Richard A. Anthes   "for his sustained contributions in theoretical and modeling studies related to tropical and mesoscale meteorology."
1988
Robert E. Dickinson   "for outstanding contributions to our understanding of biofeedback processes."
1989
Eugene M. Rasmusson   "for major contributions to climate diagnostics, especially of the relationship of the Southern Oscillation to climate anomalies."
1990
Melvin A. Shapiro   "for extraordinary achievements in aircraft probing of mesoscale phenomena, and for meso- and synoptic-scale analyses of unsurpassed quality."
Peter J. Webster   "for fundamental contributions to the understanding of low-frequency tropical circulations and tropical/midlatitude interactions."
1991
Moustafa T. Chahine   "for outstanding contributions to satellite sensing through better understanding of the inverse radiative transfer problem and development of its applications."
M. Patrick McCormick   "for outstanding contributions to satellite sensing through development of solar occultation instruments and for elucidation of the nature of polar stratospheric clouds."
1992
Lance F. Bosart   "for his demonstrations that valuable insights can be obtained by careful analysis of routine meteorological observations."
1993
Abraham H. Oort   "for wide-ranging studies of atmospheric behavior through comprehensive analysis of global observations."
1994
William M. Gray   "for pioneering contributions to the understanding and forecasting of tropical cyclones."
1995
Eugenia Kalnay   "for many applications of numerical experimentation in explaining the physical processes of atmospheric dynamics and for developing improved operational numerical forecast models."
1996
Yoshio Kurihara   "for fundamental modeling research on tropical storm dynamics and a major advance in operational hurricane forecasting."
1997
Timothy N. Palmer   "for fundamental contributions to the theory and practice of extended weather prediction and the understanding of climate phenomena."
1998
Kuo-Nan Liou   "for his pioneering work in the theory and application of radiative transport and its interaction with clouds."
1999
Anthony Hollingsworth   “for penetrating research on four-dimensional data assimilation systems and numerical models.”
The Verner E. Suomi Award
1997
John E. Hart   "for fundamental contributions to meteorology and oceanography through innovative laboratory studies of geophysical fluids."
1998
William L. Smith   "for his outstanding contributions to the advancements in remote sensing from space and the application of these data."
The Sverdrup Gold Medal
1964
Henry Stommel   "for his outstanding contributions to the dynamics of ocean currents, especially the Gulf Stream, and for the rich insight with which he has advanced knowledge of the physical nature of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena, ranging from the large-scale circulation of the oceans to cumulus clouds."
1966
Walter H. Munk   "for his outstanding contributions to the dynamics of wind-driven ocean circulations and wave phenomena on the surface of the sea."
1970
Kirk Bryan   "for his outstanding contributions to the numerical solutions of the general circulation of the oceans based on nonlinear, three-dimensional models of the oceans driven by wind stress and differential heating."
1971
Klaus Hasselmann   "for his work on turbulence and his application of weak-coupling theory to a host of geophysical wave phenomena."
1972
Vladimir Kamenkovich   "for his extension of the Sverdrup transport equation to a general theory of ocean circulation, including the effects of island and coastal boundaries, linear and nonlinear."
1975
Owen M. Phillips   "for his outstanding studies of both wave phenomena and turbulence in the upper ocean, and in particular for his contributions to the theory of ocean-wave generation."
1976
Robert W. Stewart   "for outstanding leadership in experimental and theoretical research in problems of the air–sea interface, and the adjacent turbulent boundary layers of the atmosphere and ocean. He has brought the high standards of measurement and analysis of the laboratory to field studies and has pioneered measurements of surface waves and turbulence in the upper ocean."
1977
Raymond B. Montgomery   "for his important contributions to air–sea interactions, isentropic analysis, the study of spatial and temporal analysis of sea level, and the equatorial current system. His influence on a whole generation of oceanographers and meteorologists has been profound—through his encouragement, his high standards of scholarship, and as one of the first editors of the Journal of Meteorology/Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
John C. Swallow   "for his pioneering measurements of low-frequency variability in the oceans and for his development of a new class of oceanographic instruments."
Hákon Mosby   "for his studies of bottom water formation in the Arctic and Antarctic seas and of the earth's water balance, and for his inspiring leadership in international cooperation among oceanographers."
1981
Jerome Namias   "for studies of the ocean's role in climatic variability. His long-term dedication to large-scale, air–sea interaction and inspiring leadership has laid the basis for present progress."
1983
Michael S. Longuet-Higgins   "for his many outstanding contributions to our understanding of the dynamics of ocean surface waves, including wave–current interactions, nonlinear interactions among waves, wave instabilities, and wave breaking."
1985
S. George Philander   "for many outstanding contributions to the understanding of the air–sea interaction, particularly in numerous papers describing, discussing, and explaining the Southern Oscillation–El Niño problem, including suggested new physical processes which go far to explaining the observations."
1987
James J. O Brien   "for his outstanding leadership in research on air–sea interactions, the influence of oceanic oscillations on climate variability and of intense storms on oceanic structure."
1988
Hisashi Mitsuyasu   "for pioneering experimental work on ocean-wave dynamics and its applications to wave modeling and forecasting."
1991
Klaus Wyrtki   "for pioneering studies of large-scale oceanographic variability, especially his revealing analyses of Pacific data."
1992
Mark A. Cane   "for the insight provided in his many theoretical studies of large-scale air–sea interaction."
1993
Tim P. Barnett   "for outstanding contributions to research on the role of the oceans in global climate variation."
1994
Mark A. Donelan   "for numerous contributions to the understanding of the physics of ocean surface waves."
1995
James F. Price   "for important interpretations of observations of upper ocean time dependent variability, including Ekman layers, inertial observations, response to a hurricane, oceanic eddies, and mixed layer physics."
1996
Julian P. McCreary, Jr.   "for fundamental contributions to the physical understanding of upper-ocean dynamics including El Niño, the Equatorial Undercurrent, the ocean mixed layer, and eastern boundary currents."
1997
Kristina B. Katsaros   "for pioneering research, leadership during field experiments, and dedication to international education of air–sea interaction."
1998
Willard J. Pierson   "for his contributions to air–sea interaction, particularly aspects of remote sensing."
1999
John Stuart Godfrey   “for contributions to the estimation of air–sea fluxes in the tropics, and to the theory of ocean circulation.”
The Henry Stommel Research Award
1995
Melvin E. Stern   "for profound and original contributions to the development of geophysical fluid dynamics and its application to the physics of the ocean circulation."
1996
Joseph L. Reid   "for fundamental contributions to a quantitative understanding of the global circulation, based on detailed and insightful analyses of hydrographic observations."
1997
George Veronis   "for a wide range of fundamental contributions to the development of physical oceanography and geophysical fluid dynamics."
1998
Nicholas P. Fofonoff   "for his fundamental work on the general circulation and the physical properties of the ocean and for development of observational techniques in physical oceanography."
1999
Peter B. Rhines   “for amazing physical insight and profound appreciation of observations as a guide to understanding how the ocean works.”
Award for Outstanding Services to the Society
1951
Henry Southworth Shaw   "for his contributions to the welfare of the American Meteorological Society."
1953
Harry Guggenheim   "for establishing the first airways meteorological network in America and for his support of meteorological education and research."
1955
Charles Franklin Brooks   "for a lifetime of devoted and untiring service to the Society, notably as its organizer in 1919, as its Secretary for the next 34 years, and as editor and mainstay of the Bulletin for most of its first 20 years."
1956
Robert Granville Stone   "for his many years of faithful editorship of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society and his active participation in committee and council work."
1957
Carl-Gustaf Arvid Rossby   "for his great vision and tireless efforts in transforming the American Meteorological Society into an international scientific and professional organization."
1958
Henry Garrett Houghton   "for his important contributions in the growth of the American Meteorological Society through his guidance as President, as Secretary, and his unfailing service in Council and Committee work."
The Charles Franklin Brooks Award for Outstanding Services to the Society (Until 1958, designated Award for Outstanding Services to the Society)
1960
Horace Robert Byers   "for his many years of unselfish and dedicated service to the Society as outstanding Councilor and President, and for advancing and broadening the international activities of the Society."
1961
Howard T. Orville, posthumously   "for his devoted and long-standing service to the Society as President, Councilor, and staunch supporter of all its activities. His enthusiasm, zeal, and personal dedication contributed much to the expansion of the Society."
1962
Sverre Petterssen   "for his untiring, unselfish, and important contributions to the Society over a period of years as committeeman, Councilor, and President."
1963
David M. Ludlum   "for his continuing effort, on behalf of the Society, to popularize meteorology and to stimulate the interest of young people in the field, for establishing Weatherwise, and for his effective participation in Society affairs over many years."
1964
Thomas F. Malone   "for his long, unstinting, and highly effective service to the scientific and professional aims of the American Meteorological Society. Acting as a member of the Society's Council, a member or chairman of many of its committees, Secretary of the Society, and finally as President of the Society, Dr. Malone has played a major part in framing the Society's response to the technological, social, and scientific challenges of our time. These activities, together with Dr. Malone's service in the broader field of national scientific planning, policy, and management, have been unique contributions to meteorology and the atmospheric sciences as a whole."
1965
Patrick D. McTaggart-Cowan   "for his long record of achievements in services to the Society, as Vice-President, as Councilor, and as architect of the present organizational structure of the Society. Over the last two decades he has played a vital role in the advancement of the Society as a body of scientists and as an association of professional meteorologists. His excellently conceived blueprint for new organizational structure is only one of many examples of his valuable services to the Society."
1966
John C. Beckman   "for his long and distinguished record of devoted service to the welfare and future development of our Society. As chairman of the Planning Commission, he has devotd much thought and effort to the further advancement and progress of the Society; as a member of the Membership Committee he has given liberally of his time and his counsel; and as a member, he has freely donated advice and assistance of the highest caliber in furthering the funding programs of the Society."
1967
Phil E. Church   "for his outstanding service to the American Meteorological Society for over three decades, during which time he has acted as a strong guiding force, always giving unstintingly of himself, and successfully striving to maintain the Society as a financially sound organization."
1968
Kenneth C. Spengler   "for his many contributions to the Society extending beyond those expected of the Executive Director, for the important part he had in the acquisition and restoration of the magnificent headquarters of the Society, and for his untiring efforts to have the Society keep pace with the great advances in the atmospheric sciences."
1969
Alfred K. Blackadar   "for his dedicated service and continuing efforts in promoting the aims of the Society as editor, Secretary, and Councilor with an unusual sense of human understanding."
1970
Robert Dawson Fletcher   "for two decades of unremitting and devoted service to meteorology, and to the American Meteorological Society through his work on committees, as Councilor, and as President."
1971
Louis J. Battan   "in recognition and appreciation of his imaginative, wise, and good-humored leadership during many years of service as Councilor and President of the Society."
1972
Helmut E. Landsberg   "for his many contributions as Councilor, Fellow, and Vice-President of the American Meteorological Society and for his zeal and dedication in fostering cooperation between the Society and the national scientific community."
1973
Glenn R. Hilst   "for his leadership as Treasurer, Fellow, Editor of the Journal of Applied Meteorology, and Chairman of the Publications Commission in directing the goals of the Society toward the needs of its members and the goals of both toward the needs of mankind."
1974
David F. Landrigan   "in recognition of his devoted service to the Society for over a quarter century as legal and financial counsellor and in recent years as Secretary–Treasurer."
1975
Werner A. Baum   "for his numerous exemplary services to the Society and the profession, and his leadership as an educator."
1976
Earl G. Droessler   "for his imaginative, enthusiastic, and dedicated service and his continuing constructive efforts in promoting the aims of the Society as Councilor and as Chairman of committees and commissions."
1977
Eugene Bollay   "for his remarkable leadership in Society affairs as Councilor, Commissioner and President, and for his exemplary efforts as a champion of the Society's efforts on behalf of private meteorology in the industrial sector."
1979
Robert M. White   "as Councilor and Chairman of the Planning Commission, for the stimulation he has provided the Society in broadening its activities and for his thoughtful and effective support of the Society's national and international responsibilities."
1980
Verner E. Suomi   "for his many contributions of wisdom and leadership, both formal and informal, but especially as Councilor and President."
1981
Charles L. Hosler, Jr.   "for his dedication to the pursuits of excellence in the service of meteorology to the public, as reflected in his contribution to the Society's programs, ethics, broadcasting, and consulting; for his dedication to the achievement of excellence in management of the Society as committeeman, commission chairman, Councilor, and President."
1982
David S. Johnson   "for his distinguished service to the Society, over a period of more than two decades, as chapter officer, committee leader, Councilor, and President."
1983
Chester W. Newton   "for his wise leadership as President and his long record of devoted service to the American Meteorological Society as editor of its journals and member of its committees."
1984
Richard J. Reed   "in recognition of his sustained, vigorous leadership in American Meteorological Society affairs, as Councilor and President, member of its committees, editor, and Publications Commissioner; and of his inspirational qualities as educator and researcher."
1985
Robert G. Fleagle   "for dedicated and sustained leadership in American Meteorological Society affairs as Commissioner, Councilor, and President; for fostering the goals of the Society in national scientific, educational, and public policy affairs."
1986
Richard E. Hallgren   "for dynamic advocacy and leadership as President of the American Meteorological Society, leading to enhanced partnership with governmental and international meteorology."
1987
Roscoe R. Braham, Jr.   "for his many contributions to the Society through his work on committees and as Editor, Chapter Officer, Councilor, and Fellow; and for his dedication as an educator and researcher."
1988
Evelyn Mazur   "for lengthy, exceptionally dedicated service to the members, committees, officers, and Executive Director of the Society, especially in the planning and execution of scientific meetings."
1989
Kenneth C. Spengler   "for a second 20 years of absolute dedication to the purposes and activities of the Society."
1990
Eugene W. Bierly   "for innovative and dedicated service to the Society, especially in furthering science education and international meteorology as Editor, Councilor, and President."
1991
Joseph Smagorinsky   "for exemplary and effective planning and execution of scientific and international activities of the Society."
1992
Joanne Simpson   "for distinguished and imaginative leadership as Committee Chairwoman, Commissioner, and President."
1993
George S. Benton   "for decades of exceptional service to the Society as President, Councilor, and member of numerous committees."
1994
Richard E. Orville   "for superb leadership as Commissioner for more than a decade."
1995
Harold D. Orville   "for long, continuous, and superb service to the Society as councilor, advisor, and commissioner of STAC."
1996
Eli J. Katz   "for long and distinguished service to the publication program of the Society as editor and chief editor of the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
1997
Robert T. Ryan   "for dynamic leadership in the Society with special emphasis on the benefits of meteorological services to the public."
1998
Donald R. Johnson   "for his dedication as an Editor and President, and for his leadership and innovation to improve education."
1999
Robert L. Carnahan   “for bringing to his position as Commissioner on Professional Affairs, a lifetime adherence to the highest standards of ethics and integrity.”
The Cleveland Abbe Award for Distinguished Service to Atmospheric Sciences by an Individual
1963
Lloyd V. Berkner   "for his scientific work on the upper atmosphere and for the stimulation he provided to the field of meteorology by his work as chairman of the Committee on Meteorology of the National Academy of Sciences."
1964
Francis W. Reichelderfer   "for his dedicated service to meteorology as Chief of the United States Weather Bureau. Over the past 25 years, Dr. Reichelderfer has guided our nation's civil Weather Service through a difficult era of rapid technological and scientific innovation and equally rapid social and economic change. The fact that the U.S. Weather Bureau has steadily moved to keep pace with the changing demands and conditions of our time is in itself sufficient evidence of Dr. Reichelderfer's wisdom, statesmanship, and foresight. We especially wish to express our own appreciation of his public service and his contributions to the Society's objectives."
1965
Sverre Petterssen   "for his outstanding contributions to the atmospheric sciences both as scientist and administrator. His papers and books have been guideposts for weather analysts and forecasters for more than a quarter of a century. His studies of convection and the dynamics of weather systems have assured him a high place among atmospheric scientists. Particularly noteworthy are his role in the preparation of a ten-year plan for a national effort in the atmospheric sciences and his leadership in developing a plan for an international program of research in the atmospheric sciences."
1966
Alan T. Waterman   "for his service to the Atmospheric Sciences as evidenced early in his scientific career by his contributions to the development of the single theodolite method for tracking pilot balloons to determine upper winds, and later by his many important actions to further the progress of meteorology as director of the National Science Foundation. Outstanding among these steps are his establishment of the Atmospheric Sciences program in the Foundation, his work on the Advisory Committee on Weather Control leading to the Foundation's interest in studies preparing a sound scientific basis for these activities, and his strong support of the university group recommending the establishment of a National Center for Atmospheric Research."
1967
Arthur F. Merewether   "for his long and valuable service to the meteorological profession during which his influence in aviation meteorology has been a profound one, as an administrator, as a force to initiate change for progress, and as a pioneer pilot and meteorologist with breadth of vision in both military and commercial weather service."
1968
Thomas F. Malone   for "his innumerable contributions to meteorology as teacher, as scientific investigator, as editor, as committee member, as administrator, and always as innovator. From statistical weather forecasting to international cooperation, there is hardly an aspect of meteorology which has not experienced the benefit of his positive contributions."
1969
Robert M. White   for "distinguished scientific contributions to a better understanding of the general circulation, for exceptional administrative leadership in both the private and public sectors, and for wise and imaginative statesmanship in the international aspects of the atmospheric sciences."
1970
Walter Orr Roberts   "for his remarkable leadership in institutional building; for his contributions to the development of our learned societies, to the body of scientific knowledge, and to the stimulation of interdisciplinary studies in meteorology and astronomy; and for his concerns with the impact of science and technology."
1971
Robert G. Fleagle   "for his scholarly achievements in the study of fluid dynamics and weather modification, his service to the nation in the Office of Science and Technology and in the National Academy of Sciences, and his valuable counsel for many years to the American Meteorological Society."
1972
Homer E. Newell   "for his many services to meteorology exemplified by his perception of problems and promising solutions in making key decisions regarding the meteorological satellite program, and by his skillful application of the review process during the formulation of national plans for weather modification research and the Global Atmospheric Research Program."
1973
Fred D. White   "for his dedication to advancing the cause of atmospheric science in both government and university forums through warm and personal efforts that transcend official duties."
1974
Lester Machta   "for outstanding contributions on critical atmospheric problems pertaining to the protection of the environment, especially for his studies of atmospheric constituents and pollutants including oxygen, carbon dioxide, and radioactive material."
1975
George P. Cressman   "for pioneering efforts in introducing numerical techniques into weather forecasting and his outstanding leadership in modernizing the United States Weather Service."
1976
Patrick D. McTaggart-Cowan   "for his distinguished leadership, both nationally and internationally, through his career of public service, as Director of the Canadian Meteorological Service, university president, and first Executive Director of the Science Council of Canada."
1977
Richard M. Goody   "for his valuable contributions to the studies of atmospheric radiation and planetary atmospheres and for his leadership and service in advancing the atmospheric sciences as a whole, especially in relationship to space and planetary sciences and to polar meteorology."
1978
Horace R. Byers   "for his innumerable contributions to meteorology as a scientific investigator and teacher, for his long and distinguished record of service as Councilor, Fellow, and President of the American Meteorological Society, and for his inspiring leadership in the careers of countless meteorologists."
1980
Jule G. Charney and Joseph Smagorinsky   "for their scientific leadership of the Global Atmospheric Research Program, which after a decade has culminated in the remarkably successful Global Weather Experiment."
1981
Stanley A. Changnon, Jr.   "for his dedication and tireless efforts in revealing the impacts of weather and climate on humanity."
1982
Henry G. Houghton   "for his long and dedicated service to the meteorological profession as beloved university teacher, administrator, and student advisor; as Councilor, Secretary, and President of the American Meteorological Society; and as a founder of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research."
Joachim P. Kuettner   "for his extraordinary leadership and vision in planning and implementing complex international scientific programs; and in recognition of his outstanding lifetime record of achievements as productive scientist, intrepid experimenter, inspiring administrator, patient negotiator, and skillful diplomat, to the enduring benefit of human knowledge and welfare."
1983
Helmut E. Landsberg   "for his long and distinguished record of contributions to the atmospheric and related sciences, and for his broad perspectives on the impact of atmospheric variability on global societies."
David Atlas   "for his outstanding leadership of scientific activities and contributions to national and international scientific affairs. He has provided wise and effective guidance coupled with a contagious enthusiasm that makes hard work seem easy."
1984
C. Gordon Little   "for innovative leadership in the development of remote-sensing methods and instruments facilitating research revealing the detailed structure of atmospheric phenomena, and concepts of integrated observation, analysis, and short-term forecasting systems."
1985
Sir Arthur Davies   "for extraordinary contributions to international meteorology through extended service as Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization, leading it to its present eminence as one of the great intergovernmental scientific organizations in the United Nations structure."
1986
Roy L. Jenne   "for outstanding service to the national and international atmospheric science community in providing innovative and comprehensive data management."
1987
Alfred K. Blackadar   "for his dedicated and distinguished service to the atmospheric sciences through education, professional activities, and research in physics and dynamical meteorology."
1988
Werner A. Baum   "for distinguished leadership as an educator, administrator, and counselor for the atmospheric sciences on the national scene."
1989
George J. Haltiner   "for distinguished service in the area of numerical weather prediction as teacher, researcher, and administrator."
Edwin Kessler   "for distinguished service through studies on severe storms, microphysical processes, and radar meteorology."
1990
Vincent E. Lally   "for outstanding leadership in the development of scientific ballooning and its application to meteorology."
1991
Robert H. Simpson   "for pioneering work in storm research and for outstanding leadership in planning and implementing complex operational programs over a span of decades."
1992
Earl G. Droessler   "for numerous efforts in promoting the advancement of atmospheric sciences in both the government and academic communities."
1993
Kenneth C. Spengler   "for a lifetime of creative management and supreme diplomacy on the national and international scenes as Executive Director of the Society."
1994
Francis P. Bretherton   "for vigorous leadership in helping to define, communicate, and address the scientific priorities of atmospheric and ocean science."
1995
Glenn R. Hilst   "for pioneering and extensive contributions to the atmospheric sciences, encompassing theoretical, experimental, computational and applied aspects of turbulent diffusion in the atmosphere, with special emphasis on air pollution analysis and modeling."
1996
Ronald C. Taylor   "for outstanding service as National Science Foundation program director to the atmospheric sciences community, for seeking new applications of technology to atmospheric problems, and for encouraging scientists from many disciplines to focus on unsolved problems."
1997
James R. Mahoney   "for his outstanding contributions to cleaner air through leadership of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program."
1998
Elbert W. Friday, Jr.   "for his leadership of the implementation of the historic modernization and restructuring of the National Weather Service."
1999
J. Michael Hall   “for visionary programmatic leadership fostering the development of predictive capability for climate fluctuations and their societal impacts.”
The Clarence Leroy Meisinger Award
1938
Jerome Namias   "for application of thermodynamic tools to weather forecasting."
1941
Joseph J. George   "for fog forecasting studies."
1946
Morris Neiburger   "for studies of stratus clouds."
1947
Herbert Riehl   "for aerological studies in tropical and subtropical meteorology."
1948
James E. Miller   "for studies in vertical motion."
1949
Jule G. Charney and Arnt Eliassen   "for applying numerical methods to weather prediction."
1950
John Freeman, Jr. and Morris Tepper   "for their contributions in the application of hydraulic analogies to the study of meteorological phenomena including easterly waves, squall lines, and tornadoes."
1951
Dave Fultz   "for application of experimental fluid mechanics to problems of atmospheric circulation."
1956
Ernest J. Fawbush and Robert C. Miller   "for their pioneering studies of the genesis and the practical prognosis of tornadoes and other destructive local storms."
1957
David Atlas   "for original and pioneering contributions in the field of radar meteorology."
1959
Robert G. Fleagle   "for his outstanding research contributions on the dynamics of the large-scale motions of the atmosphere."
1960
Philip D. Thompson and Norman A. Phillips   "for their theoretical and applied research in the field of numerical weather prediction."
1961
Verner E. Suomi   "for his imaginative and pioneering research work on atmospheric radiation problems in which he has effectively used both balloon and satellite observing platforms."
1962
Louis J. Battan   "for his outstanding, imaginative and pioneering research in radar meteorology and in cloud physics."
Joanne Starr Malkus   "for her outstanding experimental work in cumulus investigation by means of aircraft measurement and for her imaginative use of these observations for deductions about the dynamics and energetics of cumulus clouds and about the role of convection in the general circulation of the tropics."
1963
Edward N. Lorenz   "for his introduction of concepts leading to a better understanding of the energetics of the general circulation, and for his recent work on low-order systems indicating aperiodic vacillations from one regime of motion to another."
1964
Richard J. Reed   "for his outstanding research in modern synoptic meteorology and dynamical weather prediction. Through his interpretations of natural meteorological events in the light of dynamical theory and through his descriptive analyses of otherwise unexplained or unsuspected phenomena, Professor Reed has contributed materially to the merging of the fields of synoptic and dynamical meteorology and to the development of a unified approach toward the study of atmospheric circulations."
1965
Hans A. Panofsky   "for his significant contributions to many branches of meteorology. His original and important research has included the study of the atmospheres of planets other than the earth and the challenging problems of atmospheric turbulence, especially in the planetary boundary layer."
1966
George W. Platzman   "for his important contributions to the applications of fluid dynamics to the motions of the atmospere and the waters of the Great Lakes. His work has done much to advance our knowledge of the long, planetary waves on the rotating earth, and of atmospheric convection. His studies of the interaction between the atmosphere and the Great Lakes have very significantly improved our theoretical understanding and our ability to forecast the variations of the level of these important inland waterways."
1967
Tetsuya Fujita   "for pioneering research on the techniques of meso-meteorological analysis, for the new insights provided by such methods to our understanding of the mechanisms of severe local storms and tornadoes, and for broad contribution to the use of meteorological satellites."
Joseph Smagorinsky, Syukuro Manabe, Yale Mintz, Akio Arakawa, and Cecil E. Leith   "for their outstanding individual and collective contributions to dynamic meteorology through their pioneering efforts to numerically model the dynamic behavior of the atmosphere by utilizing directly the primitive equations of motion."
1968
Katsuyuki Ooyama   "for his imaginative studies in the dynamics of tropical cyclones and other vortices, culminating in the successful generation of a simulated tropical hurricane by an electronic computer."
1969
Richard S. Lindzen   "for masterly insight and superb analysis, which have lifted the veil from an ancient enigma, the atmosphere's diurnal tide."
1970
William L. Smith   "for developing a technique for converting satellite spectrometer measurements to vertical temperature profiles, which permitted immediate operational use of the data."
1971
Joseph Pedlosky   "for his contributions to the fundamentals of dynamic meteorology and oceanography and to the general understanding of rotating stratified fluids."
1972
Francis P. Bretherton   "for his important contributions to the theory of atmospheric motion, including the propagation of wave energy in shearing flow, the role played by critical layers in baroclinic instability and internal gravity waves, and the formation of true frontal discontinuities."
1973
Robert E. Dickinson   "for his prolific and imaginative work on a variety of problems concerning the dynamics of terrestrial and other planetary atmospheres."
James R. Holton   "for his important contributions to the study of rotating stratified fluids and the dynamics of the tropical atmosphere, including the 26-month oscillation, and to the teaching of modern dynamic meteorology."
1974
Keith A. Browning   "for his broad contributions through the imaginative use of radar observations and their synthesis with other data, thereby leading to significant new understanding of severe storms, hail, precipitation development, and clear air turbulence."
1975
John M. Wallace   "for his basic contributions to the understanding of atmospheric motions in the frequency domain and their application to tropical circulations."
1976
Thomas W. Flattery   "for his notable development of an operational objective global analysis method that uses tidal theory to relate the atmospheric mass and motion fields."
1977
Roger A. Pielke   "for fundamental contributions to mesoscale meteorology through numerical modeling of the sea breeze and interactions among the mountains, oceans, boundary layer, and the free atmosphere."
1978
Alan K. Betts   "for his theoretical and observational studies of cumulus convection, in particular his work on nonprecipitating cumulus convection and its parameterization and his application of data from the Venezuela International Meteorological and Hydrological Experiment to the investigation of the behavior of mesoscale convective systems."
1979
John C. Wyngaard   "for his experimental and theoretical studies of turbulent processes in the boundary layer."
1980
Richard A. Anthes   "for research and modeling in tropical cyclones and mesoscale meteorology."
1981
J. Michael Fritsch   "for his innovative and broadly based research on convective systems, mesoscale systems, and their interactions."
1982
Robert A. Houze, Jr.   "for his imaginative use of radar data to illuminate the structure and behavior of mesoscale meteorological phenomena ranging from the rainbands of extratropical cyclones to the large convective cloud complexes of the Intertropical Convergence Zone."
1983
Chih-Pei Chang   "for his observational and theoretical studies of the dynamics of the tropical atmosphere, particularly the Asian winter monsoon."
Joseph B. Klemp and Robert B. Wilhelmson   "for development of numerical models that have contributed significantly to the understanding of severe convective storms."
1984
Robert A. Maddox   "for important fundamental research in midlatitude mesoscale weather systems, including elucidation of the mesoscale convection complex, and pioneering contributions in the practical prognosis of flash-flood–producing storms."
1985
Louis W. Uccellini   "for innovative research on the coupling of high- and low-level jet streaks and the role of this interaction in the development of severe thunderstorms and in winter cyclogenesis."
1986
Kerry A. Emanuel   "for highly original advances in mesoscale meteorological theory and interpretation of observations."
1987
Isaac M. Held   "for outstanding contributions to the study of climate dynamics through studies of energy balances and wave dynamics."
1988
William K. M. Lau   "for fundamental studies enhancing our understanding of low-frequency oscillations."
1989
Daniel Keyser   "for fundamental studies improving our understanding of mesoscale circulation systems."
1990
Ngar-Cheung Lau   "for outstanding studies of low-frequency variability in the atmosphere by a synthesis of modeling and diagnostics."
1991
Da-Lin Zhang   "for pioneering work in the understanding and numerical modeling of mesoscale convective weather systems."
1992
Roger M. Wakimoto   "for his significant contributions to the understanding of mesoscale phenomena through insightful and detailed analysis of observations."
1993
John C. Derber   "for original contributions to the design and implementation of a global data assimilation and initialization system."
David J. Karoly   "for contributions to the understanding of the role of Rossby wave propagation in atmospheric teleconnections and to greenhose climate-change research."
1994
David A. Randall   "for outstanding contributions to our understanding of the role of clouds in the general circulation of the atmosphere."
1995
Kevin P. Hamilton   "for prolific and wide-ranging research on dynamics and climate of the atmosphere and ocean."
1996
J. David Neelin   "for innovative and far-reaching advances toward understanding low-frequency oscillations in the Tropics."
1997
Chin-Hoh Moeng   "for application of large-eddy simulation for increased understanding of turbulence and boundary layer clouds."
1998
David J. Stensrud   "for his innovative research into the structure, dynamics, and predictability of mesoscale convective systems and their impact on larger scales."
1999
Clara Deser   “for insightful and dynamically informed analyses of climate variability on time scales ranging from days to decades.”
The Henry G. Houghton Award
1990
Graeme L. Stephens   "for his outstanding research leading to better understanding of radiation–cloud interactions and their parameterization."
1991
Susan Solomon   "for outstanding theoretical and observational research on atmospheric constituent structure and for significant contributions to understanding the Antarctic ozone hole."
1992
Judith A. Curry   "for her basic contributions toward an understanding of interactions among radiative transfer, clouds, and atmospheric dynamics in high latitudes."
1993
Harshvardhan   "for major contributions to understanding the effects of aerosols on climate and cloud–radiative interactions."
1994
Venkatachalam Ramaswamy   "for fundamental contributions to radiative transfer as related to climate."
1995
Bruce A. Wielicki   "for outstanding contributions to the understanding of clouds and the earth's radiation budget derived from stellite observations and theoretical radiative transfer models."
1996
David W. Fahey   "for outstanding contributions to our understanding of the ozone layer through airborne observations and theoretical analyses."
1997
Piers J. Sellers   "for outstanding achievements in the development and field testing of models describing land biosphere–atmosphere interactions."
1998
Patrick Minnis   "for making outstanding contributions to understanding the effects of clouds and aerosols on the earth's radiation budget."
1999
Michael I. Mishchenko   “for innovative work on the theory of radiation scattering and application of these ideas to remote sensing.”
The Award for Outstanding Service by a Weather Forecaster
1967
Charles L. Mitchell   "for his record of outstanding public service during the first half of the 20th century. His generosity of spirit and remarkable talents mark him as a truly great representative of his contemporaries and as an example to forecasters of the present and future."
1968
Gordon E. Dunn   "for his outstanding and devoted public service in the performance and teaching of short-range weather forecasting in extratropical and tropical latitudes. Since assuming duty in Miami he has been the person upon whom the public has most directly depended for advice as to the course and development of each threatening Atlantic hurricane."
1969
Lee George Dickinson   "in recognition of his imaginative and untiring efforts in the utilization of satellite meteorological information at the Asian Weather Central, Fuchu, Japan. By originating the facsimile transmission of the satellite data, arranging its exchange with Japan, and training personnel of the various services, he made an outstanding contribution to weather forecasting in that area."
1970
Harlan K. Saylor   "in recognition of the extraordinary synoptic insight and forecasting skill that he has applied over many years to the effective blending of human judgment with machine calculation of the National Meteorological Center."
1971
Leonard W. Snellman   "for the excellence of his dynamic technical leadership of forecasting in the National Weather Service Western Region."
1972
Robert E. Clark   "whose sustained outstanding service while assigned to Detachment 11, 21st Weather Squadron, Torrejon Air Base, Spain, contributed significantly to the Detachment's forecast capability."
1973
Hilmer Crumrine   "for accurate forecasts made during several of the most severe tornado outbreaks of modern times, namely those of 11 April 1965, 15 May 1968, and 21 February 1971, and for sustained excellence in aviation and public-service forecasting."
1974
W. Clyde Conner and Raymond H. Kraft   "for sustained excellence and outstanding performance in hurricane forecasting over the past quarter of a century, particularly for severe hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition they have formulated systematic procedures for forecasting important hurricane-related phenomena, such as storm surges and tornadoes, which have proven to be of great value in saving lives and property."
1975
Robert C. Miller   "for his pioneering efforts to establish severe weather forecasting as a discipline within meteorology, which have greatly increased the capability of the meteorological community—both civilian and military—to predict severe storms."
1976
James F. Andrews and James F. O'Connor   "for their sustained outstanding performance in extended range forecasting."
1977
Charles R. Holliday   "for his superior record of achievement as a typhoon forecaster at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) on Guam. His contributions resulted in major improvements in the JTWC's tropical cyclone warning service, which is provided to a wide range of military and civilian users in the western North Pacific area, including U.S. Trust Territories."
1978
Elbert C. Hill, Jr.   "for his innovative use of computer technology in the preparation of routine analyses and forecasts in the Miami area, and the creation of many programs that have proved so successful that they have been adopted by other weather services, both nationally and internationally."
1979
Robert J. C. Burnash and Arthur F. Gustafson   "for outstanding service to the public through their early recognition of the likely persistence of the California water shortage of the mid-1970s, their timely recognition of its end, and their effective advice to government agencies and the public at large."
1980
Vernon G. Bohl   "for a continuing record of superior quantitative precipitation forecasting that sets a standard among his peers, and his timely forecast of the very heavy precipitation to be expected from the major New England snowstorms in February 1978."
1981
Gilbert B. Clark   "for an exceptional specific prediction in connection with the boat-lift of Cuban refugees to the United States and the abrupt weather change that occurred on April 27, 1980, being a severe squall line developing ahead of an approaching cold front."
Paul H. Swope   "for his excellent forecasting, training, and cooperation with those needing weather services and for his skill, zeal, and dedication over many years in enhancing the forecasting and warning services of the Chicago Forecast Office."
1982
John P. Crozier   "for his outstanding and distinguished forecasting record with the Optimum Track Ship Routing Program of the United States Navy."
The Francis W. Reichelderfer Award (Until 1982, designated as Award for Outstanding Service by a Weather Forecaster), (Until 1986, for Long-Term Service by Persons Engaged in Weather Forecasting Activities), (After 1986, awarded for Distinguished Public Contributions by Personnel of the Weather Services)
1983
John R. Hope   "in recognition of major contributions to important national and international programs, and for providing dedicated public service over many years."
1984
James D. Belville, Gary K.Grice, and Jimmy D. Ward   "for their pioneering and dedicated public service, in developing operational analysis and forecasting techniques to provide advanced recognition and warning of impending heavy rain and flash-flood events."
1985
Alan R. Moller   "for contributions to improved local forecasting procedures and timely issuance of severe-weather warnings. His sustained efforts have heightened public understanding, vigilance, and response to these warnings, enhancing their effectiveness for public safety."
1986
G. Alan Johnson   "for outstanding contributions in developing and applying analysis and forecasting methods directed toward severe-weather events that are responsible for flood-producing rainfall."
1987
Robert E. Muller   "for his continuing outstanding service and leadership as the Meteorologist-in-Charge at the Raleigh Weather Service Forecast Office in which he has fostered ideal university—National Weather Service interaction and high morale among the forecasters, and for dedicated support for the 1986 GALE field experiment."
1988
Fredrich Galster and William J. Gery   "for the development of the Weather Access for Hearing Impaired Printer (WEATHIP) system, providing access to weather warnings and forecasts for the hearing impaired."
1989
Stanley E. Wasserman   "for effecting improvements in the convective storm warning program in the National Weather Service's Eastern Region."
1990
Phillip D. Bothwell   "for distinguished contributions to the development and implementation of mesoanalysis techniques, leading to improved forecasts and warnings."
1991
Joel D. Martin   "for outstanding service by revolutionizing the analysis, forecasting, and warning process at the U.S. Naval Oceanography Command/Joint Typhoon Warning Center."
1992
Judson W. Ladd   "for planning and conducting a series of 'fly-in' workshops and seminars over many years in support of improved aviation weather services."
1993
Thomas A. Niziol   "for research leading to substantial improvement in the prediction of snowstorms influenced by the Great Lakes."
1994
Glenn S. Austin and Rodney F. Gonski   "for devising, promoting, and implementing the North Carolina School Weather Network."
1995
Vernon E. Kousky   "for continuous service as Editor of the Climate Diagnostics Bulletin and unstinting efforts to inform the general public, operational field meteorologists, and the research community on El Niño/Southern Oscillation and its probable consequences."
1996
Max Mayfield   "for exemplary performance as coordinator of hurricane preparedness presentations by the National Hurricane Center to emergency preparedness officials and the general public."
1997
Gregory E. Jackson   "for development of computer programs that greatly facilitate preparation and issuance of special weather statements for the public."
1998
Lans P. Rothfusz   "for his leadership of weather service efforts in providing highly detailed forecasts and advisories to the participants and observers during the 1996 Olympiad in Atlanta."
1999
Roderick A. Scofield   “for untiring work to develop and improve satellite-based products in support of forecasting heavy rains and flash floods.”
The Charles L. Mitchell Award (Since 1982, awarded for an Exceptional Specific Prediction), (Until 1987, awarded for an Exceptional Specific Prediction), (After 1987, awarded for Long-Term Service by Persons Engaged in Weather Forecasting Activities)
1983
Ronald K. Surface and Jerry A. Youngberg   "in recognition of exceptional forecasting service that was accurate, timely, and effective during the severe windstorm of November 13—14, 1981, in the Pacific Northwest."
1984
Jack Hollis   "for his careful analyses and exceptional forecasting skill in recognizing the threat and issuing appropriate warnings 12—24 hours in advance of the Arkansas floods and tornadoes of December 2—3, 1982, one of the worst natural disasters in the state's history."
1985
Robert E. Fischer   "for the accurate and timely forecast of the severe Nome, Alaska, coastal flooding storm of November 9, 1978, preventing loss of life, injury, and avoidable damage."
1986
John E. Hales, Jr., Charles D. Little, and James M. Lowe   "for exceptionally accurate and timely forecasts and warnings during the March 28—29, 1984, Carolina tornado outbreak resulting in a significant saving of lives in South Carolina."
1987
John A. Brown, Jr.   "for managing and administering an operationally oriented research group that has increased the skill, extended the range, and expanded the domain of universal weather prediction by developing numerical techniques and creating operational models."
Leo C. Clarke   "for encouraging the development and implementation of data integration analysis methods of complex computer models that analyze and predict the oceanographic and atmospheric environment, and for developing useful products from these models."
1988
Gifford F. Ely, Jr.   "for improvement of operational meteorology through strong leadership and management."
1989
Gilbert B. Clark   "for long-term excellence in tropical and hurricane forecasting."
1990
George W. Cry   "for 32 years of outstandingly productive work in climatology, meteorology, and hydrology."
1991
Donald R. Devore   "for distinguished contributions to the National Weather Service severe-weather warning program through outstanding accomplishments in activities related to operations, preparedness, and research."
1992
Marvin E. Miller   "for superior management of the provision of weather services throughout Ohio, and for implementation of the Great Lakes Marine Enhancement Program."
1993
Glenn D. Hamilton   "for superior leadership of programs of marine meteorological data acquisition and applied oceanographic research."
1994
Elliot Abrams   "for outstanding and unique dissemination of weather forecasts to the nation's public by radio and television."
1995
John D. Stackpole   "for a career devoted to improving the National Weather Service operational forecast products and to the efficient exchange of data among forecast centers worldwide."
1996
Gene J. Pfeffer   "for an outstanding 30-year career at the forefront of national weather support activities in the Air Weather Service."
1997
Kermit K. Keeter   "for leadership in forging strong collaborative applied research relationships between forecasters and university professors and students."
1998
Anthony G. Barnston   "for his wide-ranging contributions to climate prediction science and operations."
1999
Robert W. Burpee   “for the advancement of hurricane track forecasting through both research and administrative leadership.”
Award for an Exceptional Specific Prediction
1987
James A. Kaplan   "for his exceptionally accurate forecast of the December 24—25, 1982, Denver, Colorado blizzard, resulting in advanced public awareness during the holiday travel period that undoubtedly saved many lives."
John R. Roadcap   "for his exceptionally accurate forecasts for Hurricanes Elena, Juan, and Kate during the 1985 hurricane season, which resulted in excellent preparations on the part of Eglin Air Force Base personnel and avoidance of loss of lives, equipment, and property."
1988
Larry H. Eblen   "for the accurate and timely forecast of the central-Texas flash flood event of October 19, 1985."
1989
Eddie G. Brite, Constantine Pashos, Patrick Tyra, and John V. Wright, Jr.   "for excellent warnings of the May 22, 1987, tornado event in West Texas."
1990
Larry F. Wilson   "for exceptionally accurate and clearly worded outlooks covering the major severe-weather event in midcontinent on November 15, 1988."
1991
Norman W. Junker   "for his extremely difficult and extraordinarily accurate forecast of the record midwestern snowstorm of October 18 and 19, 1989."
1992
Edward R. Agre   "for skillful long-range prediction of the record-setting Arctic Outbreak of 2 February 1989 throughout the Southern United States."
1993
Walter H. Drag   "for a highly skillful forecast of the devastating storm that struck the Southern New England coast on October 30, 1991."
1994
Henry E. Buehner   "for his exceptional wind forecast for the Oregon Coast on 3—4 February 1991, associated with a rapidly deeping cyclone."
1995
Robert S. Davis and Roger Stairs   "for providing officials from the Emergency Management Agency for Butler County, Pennsylvania, with an extremely accurate flash flood warning on 14 July 1992."
1996
Andrew D. Stern and James L. Wiesmueller   "for expert radar interpretation and timely storm warnings and statements during the 27 July 1994 tornado outbreak over the mid-Atlantic region."
1997
Ira Kosovitz, Bruce C. Renneke, and David R. Willson   "for forecasting well in advance a very severe windstorm that struck Oregon and Washington on 12 December 1995."
1998
Andrew D. Stern   "for exceptonal efforts in providing the Emergency Management Office of Virginia outstanding forecasts and warning of flash flooding in Madison County on 27 June 1995."
1999
Anthony J. Cristaldi III, Bartlett C. Hagemeyer, David W. Sharp, and Scott M. Spratt   “for their extremely accurate prediction of the devastating tornado outbreak in Florida on 22–23 February 1998.”
The Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Advance of Applied Meteorology
Peter R. Leavitt   “in recognition of decades of pioneering contributions to customized weather predictions for agriculture and industry.”
1956
Joseph J. George   "for his numerous contributions to the improvement of practical forecasting for airways operation, notably with respect both to general flight conditions and to local terminal conditions."
1957
Vincent J. Schaefer   "for his original contributions in the field of experimental and physical meteorology, particularly his pioneering work in artificial nucleation."
1959
Carl-Gustaf Arvid Rossby, posthumously.   "He did much as President of the American Meteorological Society in 1944—1945 to convince industry of the importance of developing all phases of industrial meteorology and secured cooperation and support of large progressive companies in this effort. He persuaded the U.S. Weather Bureau to make weather information over teletype facilities available to private meteorologists without charge. He encouraged and inspired many younger meteorologists to enter the field of applied meteorology. In 1927 under the sponsorship of the Daniel Guggenheim Fund for Aeronautics, he established the first model airway weather service in the United States."
1960
Henry T. Harrison   "for his pioneering work in aviation meteorology and his continuing key role in the development of modern aeronautical meteorology and its application to the jet era."
1961
Robert D. Elliott   "for his effective leadership and outstanding administration in broadly pursuing opportunities for expanding meteorological research and its applications in private industry."
1962
Alfred H. Glenn   "for his path-setting development in combining meteorological and civil engineering knowledge to form an effective approach for weather advice to industry, accepted as a basis for management decision."
1963
Herbert C. S. Thom   "for a quarter century of contributions to applied meteorology, including furnishing climatological estimates to the armed forces during World War II, major contributions to the problems of statistical analysis of climatological data, development of wind design data, and development of a much-improved formula for calculating annual and seasonal energy use for domestic heating."
1965
Loren W. Crow   "Certified Consulting Meteorologist, who is one of the first meteorologists to establish a successful business based solely on the private practice of consulting. Over the past several years, his many contributions to the Society, valuable services to his clients, and continued maintenance of the highest standards of professional ethics have reflected credit upon the Society and the profession as a whole and have greatly improved the stature of the consulting meteorologist."
1966
Eugene Bollay   "Certified Consulting Meteorologist, who has demonstrated imagination and technical skill in many areas of industrial meteorology, who has contributed generously to the affairs of the Society, including its progress to better inform the public, and who, as an example of the private meteorological practitioner, has won the respect of the public and profession alike."
1967
Charles Pennypacker Smith   "for his pioneering contributions to the ethical development of the field of industrial meteorology and his continued support of the practice of consulting meteorology over the past two decades."
1968
Wallace E. Howell   "for his valuable contributions to the theory and practice of the modification of clouds by artificial nucleation. Over the years, he has conducted many cloud-seeding operations, thereby helping to reveal both the effectiveness and the limitations of cloud-seeding procedures."
1969
E. Wendell Hewson   "for his pioneering work in the application of meteorology to the air-pollution problems of industry and health."
1970
Arthur F. Merewether   "for his leadership in aviation meteorology and for his effective application of meteorology during World War II."
1971
George P. Cressman   "in recognition of his deep personal concern for the effective application of meteorology, and his skilled conversion of a broad knowledge of this science into more than two decades of outstanding service to the nation."
1972
Vincent J. Oliver   "for his innovative contributions over the past three decades in the application of new meteorological observations and theory to the problem of weather forecasting and for his creative use of meteorological satellite data."
Howard B. Kaster   "for his pioneering contributions to the application of meteorological observations and theory to airline operations and the development of ocean routing procedures valuable to civilian and military ocean transportation."
1973
Harold A. Bedient   "for his contributions in the automation of global tropical analysis, flight planning, weather graphics and displays, weather data processing, communications, and computer operations."
Robert E. Munn   "for his extensive activities in the application of basic concepts of micrometeorology and atmospheric turbulence and diffusion to problems of air pollution, biometeorology, and recently to the whole spectrum of international environmental problems."
1974
Robert A. McCormick   "for his remarkable national and international leadership in air pollution meteorology; for his foresight and initiative in bringing about global turbidity monitoring, advances in air quality simulation modeling, and productive urban air-pollution field studies; and for his effectiveness in preserving a rigorous scientific approach in dealing with pressing applied problems."
1975
William H. Klein   "for his notable development of objective procedures for predicting surface weather elements and his leadership in bringing these and other scientific advances in meteorology into practical use."
1976
Don G. Friedman   "for his astute contributions to the quantitative estimation of the risks of natural geophysical and environmental hazards."
Bernard Vonnegut   "for his pioneering discoveries of artificial techniques for the nucleation of ice crystals, which have continued to provide the basis for weather modification."
1977
John E. Wallace   "for his pioneering efforts in the application of meteorological skills to the birth and development of the field of industrial meteorology, and for his dedication to the viability and growth of this sector through the maintenance of high standards and professional competence during the past three decades."
1980
Allan H. Murphy   "for his innovative experimental and practical studies related to probability forecasting and for significant contributions to the theory and practice of forecast evaluation."
1981
Harry R. Glahn   "for his pioneering work in the development and application of the method of model output statistics and effective supervision of a broad development program for operational forecast guidance products."
1982
J. Stewart Marshall   "for his pioneering contributions to the development and application of radar as a standard tool of applied meteorology."
1983
Charles J. Neumann   "for his pioneering studies, and inspiring leadership, in hurricane research in support of the operational mission of the National Hurricane Center in Miami, and the hurricane missions of the National Weather Service Offices in San Francisco and Honolulu."
1984
Paul B. MacCready   "for basic and applied contributions in turbulence and diffusion, air quality, cloud properties, wind power, and advances in instrumentation to monitor the atmospheric environment. In these pursuits, as in his innovation of ultralight aircraft, he has demonstrated the value of interdisciplinary vision in achieving goals."
1985
E. Philip Krider   "for significant contributions to applied meteorology through the development and application of lightning detection instrumentation, thereby improving public services and helping to save lives and property."
1986
Dennis W. Trettel   "for outstanding contributions in the development and application of practical techniques for preparing and disseminating industry-oriented weather forecasts. His leadership and active participation as a private sector forecaster spanning four decades have brought honor and respect to the meteorological profession."
1988
T. Theodore Fujita   "for pioneering studies of damaging storms on the mesoscale."
1989
Norman A. Phillips   "for major contributions to the design and operation of the Nested Grid Model at the National Meteorological Center."
1990
Franklin A. Gifford, Jr.   "for outstanding contributions to the understanding of turbulent diffusion, and for the development of simple methods of diffusion estimation."
1991
Stanley A. Changnon, Jr.   "for long-sustained and successful efforts to apply climatological knowledge to the satisfaction of a wide variety of agricultural and industrial needs."
1992
Michael R. Smith   "for pioneering applications of computer graphic newspaper weather displays, and innovative procedures for TV severe weather broadcasts."
1993
Richard H. Thuillier   "for thirty years of notable application of meteorology to practical problems in government and industry."
1994
Steven R. Hanna   "for finding innovative solutions to complex air quality problems for private and public clients."
1995
Keith J. Brown   "for over 35 years of actively and effectively promoting ethical and technical integrity in the practice of applied meteorology and weather modification."
1996
Hal W. Brown   "for pioneering work in air pollution meteorology and analyses and photochemical modeling that reduced by $100 million the pollution control costs in San Diego County, California."
1997
Leslie R. Lemon   "for pioneering work including design and development of the WSR-88D Doppler weather radar system."
1998
George E. McVehil   "for continuous, long-term contributions to the understanding of meteorology and its applications to applied problems for industrial and governmental clients."
The Award for Outstanding Service by a Broadcast Meteorologist
1999
Harvey Leonard   “for more than two decades of consistent, high-quality weathercasting serving the people of New England.”
Robert E. Munn   “for early recognition that the conjunction of biology and meteorology includes the full range of organisms and spatial scales and for many years of improved understanding thereof.”
1977
Roy L. Leep, Jr.   "for outstanding leadership and innovations in weathercasting which bring great credit to him and distinction to the Society and the profession, and for setting high standards for all broadcast meteorologists."
1980
Donald E. Kent   "for his pioneering and continuing efforts in demonstrating that there is a vast and enthusiastic audience for a knowledgeable, in-depth treatment of weather facts and forecasts."
1981
Conrad L. Johnson   "for his outstanding leadership in weathercasting, which brings great credit and distinction to the Society and the profession; also for setting high standards for all broadcast meteorology.
1982
Harry A. Volkman   "for outstanding service to his community and the meteorological profession for the past quarter century, and for his work in furthering public education in meteorology in the Chicago area."
1983
John S. Coleman   "for his many years of service in presenting weather reports of high informational, educational, and professional quality to a national television audience, and for his pioneering efforts in establishing a national cable weather channel combining the latest advances in broadcast technology, weather science, and meteorological communications."
1984
George A. Winterling   "for his skills and pioneering efforts in developing animated weather presentations that allow the viewer to better understand the world of meteorology, and for continued excellence and high standards employed in his weather broadcasts."
1985
Gregory B. Fishel and William Schmidt   "for outstanding service to WRAL-TV viewers and area radio listeners in connection with the tornado outbreak of March 28, 1984, and for assistance to the National Weather Service in relaying warnings after the NOAA Weather Wire was disabled."
1986
James D. Williams   "for 28 years of outstanding broadcast weather service to television viewers of central Oklahoma and for pioneering achievements in media presentation of weather radar data."
1987
Richard R. Fletcher   "for outstanding service to viewers during the hurricane season of 1985."
1988
Raymond E. Falconer   "for tens of thousands of competent and congenial radio weather forecasts and for decades of public education about the atmosphere."
1989
Jack C. Capell   "for promoting meteorology through the media of radio and television in an educational manner, while serving as a shining example of tenacity, perseverance, dedication, and enthusiasm to area listeners and viewers."
1990
Terrence F. Kelly   "for his revolutionary contributions to television weathercasting through use of computer graphics."
1991
Peter F. Giddings   "in recognition of his tireless efforts to combat scientific illiteracy among our nation's youth, and for his many contributions to the Society's activities."
1992
Harold E. Taft, posthumously   "in recognition of his warmth as a broadcaster and his professionalism as a forecaster."
1993
Elliot Abrams   "for decades of significant contributions to radio weather broadcasting and to weather education at all levels."
1994
Bruce W. Schwoegler   "for his continuing dynamic and innovative approaches to meteorological education for public school students."
1995
Kirk T. Melhuish   "for going above and beyond the call of duty to provide lifesaving weather information for the residents of northern Georgia during the 1993 Storm of the Century and the 1994 Palm Sunday Tornado Outbreak."
1996
Leonard M. Slesick   "for decades of outstanding service providing weather information to his Amarillo, Texas, television viewers and for an extraordinary program of community involvement."
1997
Thomas E. Skilling III   "for extraordinary efforts in producing special weather television programs that have served to educate the public."
1998
Troy M. Kimmel, Jr.   "as a long-time champion of high standards of excellence in Broadcast Meteorology and as an effective link between the National Weather Service and the broadcast community."
The Award for Outstanding Achievement in Bioclimatology
1960
Frederick Sargent II   "for his success in organizing the field of bioclimatology in this country and for his outstanding studies on the effects of weather on man."
1963
Konrad J. K. Buettner   "for his distinguished and continuing studies on the influence of the atmospheric environment on man."
1964
Helmut E. Landsberg   "for his contributions to the science of bioclimatology and for his vigorous and effective efforts to bring attention to this field in proportion to its scientific and public importance. Dr. Landsberg not only has clarified the basic physical problems of determining the climate of the biosphere, but also has brought out clearly the main biological, ecological, and medical factors of the microclimate that affect the health, happiness, efficiency, and safety of the human organism. In view of the fact that man's knowledge should be applied primarily to man in his habitat, we wish to recognize our appreciation of Dr. Landsberg's efforts to increase our understanding of the normal human environment and its effect on our lives and activities."
1966
Frederick A. Brooks   "in recognition of his role as a prominent pioneer in the application of physical principles to problems of bioclimatology, particularly in regard to agricultural crops. To those working in this field, his studies of the radiation environments of plants, of heat transfer in the air near the ground, of the deposition of aerosols, and of the development of techniques for the benefit of agricultural productions are well known. His Introduction to Physical Microclimatology stands alone in its breadth and depth of treatment of these problems."
1967
Paul E. Waggoner   "for his outstanding contributions in relating microclimates to plant development and for the practical application of this knowledge to agricultural problems."
1969
William G. Wellington   "for bringing a unique combination of biological and micrometeorological insight to the study of insect biometeorology."
1971
David M. Gates   "for his comprehensive understanding, clear perspectives, and effective communication of concepts concerning the important relation between living organisms and their radiation environment."
1972
Igho H. Kornblueh   "for his systematic studies on the effects on ionized particles on human beings, and for his leadership in biometeorological research."
1973
Harold D. Johnson   "for his studies in environmental physiology relating to biologic responses of large and small animals to climate and other environmental factors."
1976
G. LeRoy Hahn   "for his leadership in the field of basic and applied climatological research concerned with establishing basic climatic design criteria for farm animals. His work for the improvement of the animal industry is recognized by scientists throughout the world."
1978
Norman J. Rosenberg   "for his many contributions to the field of agricultural bioclimatology, including his book on the biological environment of agricultural crops that has become a standard in its field, and for his services on numerous professional committees and boards, both in the American Meteorological Society and in government services at state and federal levels."
1980
Champ B. Tanner   "for his solid, original and carefully researched contributions to the field of biometeorology and his high standards of academic excellence."
1981
William E. Reifsnyder   "for his numerous and outstanding contributions in forest meteorology."
1982
Harold C. Fritts   "for his outstanding achievements in establishing the scientific basis of dendroclimatology, and for his valuable contribution to knowledge of climatic variations by means of tree ring analysis."
The Award for Outstanding Achievement in Biometeorology, (Until 1982, designated as Award for Outstanding Achievement in Bioclimatology)
1983
Wilbert O. Haufe   "for his many contributions to man's knowledge through the application of medical entomology and micrometeorology to the study of factors affecting the health and productivity of animals and man."
1985
Robert H. Shaw   "for outstanding research in atmosphere soil crop interactions and practical application of the results, and for devotion to the education of a generation of biometeorologists."
1988
Helmut Leith   "for pioneering a global interdisciplinary approach to the area of ecology and its connection to climate."
1990
Edgar R. Lemon   "for pioneering work in the application of aerodynamic transport methods to the study of transpiration and photosynthesis in crops."
1992
Donald E. Aylor   "for his leading role in studying intermittent aspects of turbulence in models of spore release."
1996
Michael E. Irwin   "for his contributions to, and enthusiastic promotion of, the study of the movement and dispersal of biota by atmospheric processes."
1997
Gerd Jendritzky   "for his leading role in advancing bioclimatic mapping and modeling for urban and regional planning."
1998
William P. Lowry   "for his many contributions to the field of biometeorology as a teacher and research scientist."
The Award for Outstanding Services to Meteorology by a Corporation
1999
Hughes Aircraft Company/Hughes Space and Communications Company and Raytheon Systems Company   Each was cited for “many contributions to meteorology and oceanography and especially for the SSM/I Microwave Imager.”
Lockheed Martin Corporation   “for its role in the development of the NEXRAD network and for its pioneering work with polar orbiting meteorological satellites.”
1951
House Beautiful (magazine)   "for the far-reaching and highly stimulating work initiated by this magazine through the Climate Control Project."
1953
The Munitalp Foundation   "for the far-reaching support devoted to many phases of meteorological activities."
1954
National Broadcasting Corporation   "for performing an important public service through television coverage of the weather on its network programs, 'Today' with Dave Garroway and James Clayton Fidler and 'News Caravan' with John Cameron Swayze and John Clinton Youle."
1955
Science Service Inc.   "for its extensive coverage and accurate reporting of current developments in theoretical and applied meteorology."
1956
The New York Times   "for its comprehensive editorial treatment and its consistently accurate reporting to the public of weather problems and weather news."
1957
The Travelers Insurance Companies   "for their foresight, initiative, and courage in promoting and developing an entirely new field of specialized weather service for the American public."
1959
General Electric Company   "for early recognition of the importance of meteorological phenomena in the operation of nuclear energy facilities and for bold and imaginative action by the Company's Hanford Atomic Products Operation in developing a continuing meteorological program uniquely adapted to the nuclear energy industry."
1960
American Airlines, Inc., Eastern Air Lines, Pan American World Airways, Inc., Trans World Airlines, and United Air Lines   "for their active support of the meteorological profession in maintaining their own specialized staff since the pioneering days of scheduled air service, and their many technical contributions to the field of aeronautical meteorology."
1961
Pacific Gas and Electric Company   "Pacific Gas and Electric Company has maintained an active support of private weather services since 1937. It is the first and probably only utility company in the United States that has made full use of weather facilities in its daily operations. It has also maintained an active interest in meteorology research and has made substantive contributions in this area."
1963
Radio Corporation of America   "for contributions to meteorology through its role in producing the successful TIROS meteorological satellites."
1965
The Christian Science Monitor   "for consistently doing an outstanding job in reporting news about the atmospheric sciences. This has been accomplished through the medium of on-the-spot stories of new developments as well as by extensive feature articles treating particular aspects of meteoroloy. The dual role of public service and education by this exceptional newspaper certainly makes it richly deserving of the Award for Outstanding Services to Meteorology by a Corporation."
1966
Industrial Laboratories of the International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation   "for their contributions to the development of the high resolution radiometer flown on the Nimbus I which made nighttime images of the earth's cloud cover from pole to pole quickly accessible. These pictures expressed as temperatures of the radiating surface give the meteorologist a new opportunity for a more quantitative analysis of the earth's atmosphere."
1967
Atlantic Research Corporation   "for development of the meteorological rocket vehicle, thereby permitting a significant vertical extension of man's ability to synoptically sound the atmosphere."
1968
Santa Barbara Research Center of Hughes Aircraft Company   "for performing the intricate and exacting task of constructing the Spin-Scan camera, which has been borne aloft by high-level satellites. In the course of a few months its pictures have become familiar to the public, and have established the large cloud systems as the most prominent features of the earth when viewed from space."
1969
Science Associates, Inc.   "for its valuable services to the atmospheric sciences as professional consultants on instrumentation to government, education, industry and the public."
1970
A. H. Glenn & Associates, Murray and Trettel, Inc., North American Weather Consultants, Northeast Weather Service, and Weather Corporation of America   Each was cited for "pioneering the practice of private meteorology in the United States, thereby helping to develop an industry which has made significant contributions to the American economy."
1971
Scientific American   "for its recognition of the important roles played by atmospheric and oceanic processes in man's environment, and the effective communication of these concepts to the public."
1972
General Electric Company   "for the contribution of its Space Division to the Nimbus satellite program in developing the spacecraft used to orbit important new meteorological satellite sensors, including those designed to sound the atmosphere on a global scale."
1973
WTVT Television Service of Tampa, Fla.   "for outstanding performance in providing full coverage on television and through its own publications promoting meteorology, meteorological organizations, and support for weather activities by the public sector."
1974
Barnes Engineering Company   "for important contributions to the development of instruments and their applications in the field of infrared remote sensing of the earth and atmosphere from ground-based, airborne, and space platforms."
1975
National Geographic Society   "for their continuing efforts in exploration of man's environment, including their expeditionary research in the atmosphere and remote reaches of the earth as well as their magnificent contribution to the education of the public."
1976
The Franklin Institute   "for 150 years of dedicated scientific service to the nation through the dissemination of scientific findings, including pioneering meteorological contributions, and through many public education programs."
1977
University Corporation for Atmospheric Research   "for outstanding contributions to the advance of the atmospheric sciences through the management of the National Center for Atmospheric Research, thereby providing unique resources to the community, the leadership and conduct of major research investigations and symposia, and a wide variety of other significant services to the profession and the Society."
1978
Massachusetts Institute of Technology   "for its leadership in meteorological education since the founding in 1928 of the first academic meteorology department in the United States."
1979
Environmental Research and Technology, Inc.   "for the significant role it has played in facilitating the solution of environmental problems by the meteorological profession."
1980
Helen Dwight Reid Educational Foundation (HELDREF)   "for the significant role it is playing in the meteorological education of students and the general public through the pages of Weatherwise."
1981
Particle Measuring Systems   "for their critical role played in designing, developing, and supplying particle spectrometers of high accuracy and reliability to science and industries throughout the world."
1982
Maryland Center for Public Broadcasting   "for its major contribution to both aviation safety and public education in meteorology over the past decade, by providing timely, informative, and educational weather information first on Aviation Weather and since 1978 on A.M. Weather, a program of extraordinary professional merit now being aired by over 250 Public Broadcasting Service stations nationwide."
1983
Academic Press, Inc.   "for its contributions to the advancement of meteorology through its outstanding series of textbooks and monographs."
1984
Electric Power Research Institute   "for sponsorship of a multifaceted and integrated program on critical environmental problems, in a varied array of scientific disciplines bearing on atmospheric research encompassing meteorology, physics, chemistry, and biology, including instrumental development and verification of dispersion models."
1985
SRI International   "for creative development of laser-oriented remote sensing systems which have produced new levels of information on atmospheric transport of gases and fine particles."
1986
Gannet Co., Inc.   "for promoting public interest and understanding of meteorology across the nation by publishing the excellent weather page in USA TODAY."
1987
For Spacious Skies Foundation   "for fostering awareness and appreciation of the sky, and for promoting innovative school and public educational programs, based on awareness of the sky, which involve unique cooperations between school educators and broadcast meteorologists."
1988
National Wildlife Federation   "for its creative educational efforts among children, specifically the 'Wild about Weather' issue of the series Ranger Rick's Naturescope."
1989
General Motors Research Laboratories   "for outstanding contributions to our understanding of the relationship between meteorology and air pollution."
1990
The Weather Channel   "for uniue efforts in disseminating forecasts and enhancing public understanding of meteorology."
1991
WSI Corporation   "for fostering public awareness of advanced weather observation systems through dissemination of meteorological data in a graphic and reliable manner."
1992
Alden Electronics, Inc.   "for more than forty years of leadership in the development of weather map recording, transmission, and display."
1993
Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.   "for commitment to scientific excellence, service to the public, and notable contributions to atmospheric science."
1994
Electric Power Research Institute   "for advancing the application of global climate modeling by developing the Model Evaluation Consortium for Climate Assessment."
1995
Mount Washington Observatory   "for conducting pioneering mountain meteorological studies and maintaining a unique observational record of mountain-top extreme weather conditions."
1996
Cray Research, Inc.   "for major contributions to the advancement of meteorology through its pioneering supercomputers and its support of meteorological research."
1997
Space Systems/Loral   "for extraordinary management efforts fostering greater cooperation between government and industry, thereby improving the utility of GOES."
1998
R. M. Young Company   "for developing and providing high-quality meteorological instruments over one-third of a century."
The Editor's Award
1969
Norman A. Phillips   "for his referee's reports of outstanding merit on manuscripts submitted for publication in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. In addition, he has had a most important influence in establishing and helping to maintain the high standards of JAS."
1970
Chester W. Newton   "for his referee's reports of outstanding merit on manuscripts submitted for publication in the Journal of Applied Meteorology. By such work the Society s journals are substantially improved."
1971
Peter V. Hobbs   "for his referee's reports of outstanding merit on manuscripts submitted for publication in both the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences and Journal of Applied Meteorology."
1972
James W. Deardorff   "for his critical and conscientious review of manuscripts for the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, resulting in considerable improvement in its scientific quality, and thereby contributing significantly to the high standards of the journal."
1973
George W. Platzman   "for his extraordinarily conscientious and comprehensive reviews on behalf of the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
1974
Norihiko Fukuta   "for his consistently detailed, knowledgeable and perceptive reviews for the Journal of Applied Meteorology. His constructive criticisms have surpassed simple criticism and have led to the strengthening of many manuscripts, and therefore of the journal as a whole."
1975
Gabriel T. Csanady   "for his seemingly endless capacity for truly meaningful reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Physical Oceanography. It is through the untiring efforts of such individuals that this journal has been built."
1976
Stanley L. Barnes   "for his thoughtful and detailed reviews and supportive assistance to the Editor during the transition of the Monthly Weather Review to the American Meteorological Society."
Robert E. Dickinson   "for his unusually constructive and authoritative reviews of scientific contributions to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, reviews which have led to substantial improvement of both the quality and style of the journal."
1978
Jerry D. Mahlman   "for his thorough and authoritative reviews of manuscripts submitted to both the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorological Monographs. His perceptive suggestions have led to substantial improvements of several important contributions."
1979
John M. Wallace   "for his uniformly excellent reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Monthly Weather Review and other publications of the Society."
1980
Kenneth H. Bergman   "for his insight and thorough reviews of numerous manuscripts in the Journal of Applied Meteorology through thoughtful comments leading to improvement of the papers and grateful recognition of his endeavors by the authors."
1981
Julian P. McCreary, Jr.   "for providing constructive and thought-provoking reviews on numerous manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
1982
Robert A. Houze, Jr.   "for his referee's reports of outstanding merit on manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
1983
Roland A. Madden   "for his critical and insightful reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Monthly Weather Review and other publications of the Society."
1984
Arnold Court   "for his consistently prompt, thorough, and constructive reviews of manuscripts that contributed to the high quality and standards of the Society's publications."
1985
Kenneth H. Brink   "for his informed, penetrating, and prompt reviews. They have been exceptionally helpful to the authors and editors of the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
1986
Robert P. Davies-Jones   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Michael B. Richman   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Climate and Applied Meteorology."
Dean H. Roemich   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
Ronald B. Smith   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Monthly Weather Review."
Alvin L. Morris   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology."
1987
Greg J. Holland and John L. McBride   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Edwin L. Crow   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Climate and Applied Meteorology."
Andrew F. Bennett   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
James E. Dye   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology."
1988
James R. Holton   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Thomas R. Karl   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Climate and Applied Meteorology."
Glenn R. Ierley   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
William A. Cooper   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology."
1989
Margaret A. Lemone   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Gary A. Briggs   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Applied Meteorology."
Daniel Keyser   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Monthly Weather Review."
Andrew J. Weinheimer   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology."
Kevin E. Trenberth   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Climate."
1990
William Blumen   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Andrew N. Staniforth   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Monthly Weather Review."
Robert E. Livezey   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Climate."
Dennis H. McCarthy   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to Weather and Forecasting."
1991
John M. Brown   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Peter Müller   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
Norman W. Junker   "for his editorial contributions to the Special Issue of Weather and Forecasting on the National Meteorological Center published in 1989."
1992
Bradley F. Smull   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Paul L. Smith   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Applied Meteorology."
Ann E. Gargett   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
John R. Gyakum   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Monthly Weather Review."
Stuart D. Smith   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology."
John E. Walsh   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Climate."
1993
Dennis L. Hartmann   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Paola Malanotte-Rizzoli   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
Philip J. Rasch   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Monthly Weather Review."
Dusan S. Zrnic   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology."
Joseph T. Schaefer   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to Weather and Forecasting."
David S. Gutzler   "for providing exceptionally meritorious reviews of manuscripts submitted to the Journal of Climate."
1994
Chin-Hoh Moeng   "for meticulous reviews of papers on the boundary layers and turbulent fluxes for the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Carmen J. Nappo   "for timely, high quality reviews of manuscripts related to turbulence and diffusion for the Journal of Applied Meteorology."
John M. Huthnance   "for knowledgeable, penetrating, thorough reviews for the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
Marilyn M. Wolfson   "for consistently insightful reviews focusing on critical points for the Monthly Weather Review."
Albert J. Plueddemann   "for multiple, prompt, and thorough reviews for the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology."
Charles A. Doswell III   "for providing penetrating and thought-provoking reviews on numerous manuscripts submitted to Weather and Forecasting."
John R. Lanzante   "for punctual, thorough, and constructive reviews for the Journal of Climate."
1995
Marvin A. Geller   "for outstanding leadership in initiating, executing, and implementing the JAS Special Issue on results from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) for the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Witold F. Krajewski   "for attracting papers in hydrometeorology, and for rapid, conscientious evaluation of manuscripts for the Journal of Applied Meteorology."
William G. Large   "for critical reviews which have decidedly helped the editors to maintain the standard of publication for the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
Michael L. Kaplan   "for unusually thorough reviews which cover both the procedures used and the results for Monthly Weather Review."
Robert E. Cheney   "for many thoughtful and high quality reviews submitted promptly over the past six years for the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology."
Paul J. Kocin   "for coordination of the series of Special Issues on Regional Forecasting Problems within the National Weather Service for Weather and Forecasting."
Richard D. Rosen   "for such insightful and constructive reviews that an author twice expressed his gratitude in writing to the chief editor and that two editors have reported on his prompt, incisive, and fair reviews for the Journal of Climate."
1996
Qin Xu   "for many prompt, insightful, and thorough reviews for the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences."
Jeremy M. Hales   "for excellent coordination of a special issue on atmospheric chemistry and for assisting in the review of several related manuscripts for the Journal of Applied Meteorology."
Edward S. Sarachik   "for many constructive reviews that have assisted the editors in maintaining the journal's high standards for the Journal of Physical Oceanography."
Richard E. Orville   "for outstanding work in organizing the special issue on lightning and atmospheric electricity for Monthly Weather Review."
Dudley B. Chelton   "for responsive reviews and generous assistance as associate editor for the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology."
J. Paul Dallavalle   "for consistently comprehensive, insightful, and constructive reviews as an associate editor for Weather and Forecasting."
Dennis L. Hartmann   "for wise judgment and comments that invariably improved the quality of published papers for the Journal of Climate."
1997
David J. Raymond   "for prompt and fair evaluation of a large number of complex manuscripts" for the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences.
Grant W. Petty   "for his exceptionally careful and insightful reviews in the area of satellite remote sensing" for the Journal of Applied Meteorology.
Edward C. Monahan   "for frequent, extremely thorough, scholarly, and constructive reviews" in the Journal of Physical Oceanography.
John W. Nielsen-Gammon   "for timely, concise, and insightful reviews for manuscripts pertaining to a variety of topics covered by the Monthly Weather Review."
Walter F. Dabberdt   "for consistently constructive and fair reviews" for the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology.
Allan H. Murphy   "for highly knowledgeable and constructive reviews of many papers requiring statistical expertise" for Weather and Forecasting.
Clara Deser   "for her reviews are thorough, concise, and crystal clear, and have a beauty and completeness akin to a fine piece of art" for the Journal of Climate.
1998
Brian E. Mapes   "for consistently giving thought-provoking reviews on manuscripts dealing with tropical convection" for the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences.
Ramesh C. Srivastava   "for his thoughtful reviews with criticisms aimed at improving the manuscript" for the Journal of Applied Meteorology.
Claes G. Rooth   "for insightful reviews of difficult and sometimes controversial manuscripts" for the Journal of Physical Oceanography.
Kevin R. Knupp   "for a record of consistently on-time, thorough, and constructive reviews" for the Monthly Weather Review.
Lucy R. Wyatt   "for careful and prompt reviews beyond what could be reasonably expected by an editor" for the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology.
Stephen F. Corfidi   "for many comprehensive and constructive reviews that enhanced the presentation of the contributors research" for Weather and Forecasting.
Dennis L. Hartmann   "for his conscientious, thorough, and insightful reviews on a wide range of subjects" for the Journal of Climate.
1999
Xubin Zeng   “for providing prompt, constructive reviews on seven papers over the last year.”
Francis L. Ludwig   “for consistently providing high-quality reviews, as demonstrated by an exceptional effort in the past year.”
Seelye Martin   “for conscientious and careful reviews of several manuscripts submitted during the last year.”
Edward J. Zipser   “for consistent record of prompt, constructive, and thorough reviews of an unusually large number of manuscripts covering a wide range of subjects.”
R. Paul Lawson   “for technical expertise and insightful reviews that have done so much to maintain the high standards.”
Warren Blier   “for exhaustive, prompt, scholarly reviews and a commitment to mentor operational meteorologists in their efforts to publish in the refereed literature.”
John E. Walsh   “for consistently providing comprehensive, insightful and constructive reviews on a broad range of issues related to climatic variability and change.”
The Robert E. Horton Lecturer in Hydrology
1974
Luna B. Leopold   University of California—Berkeley   "Great Ideas, Great Problems."
1975
Max A. Kohler   World Meteorological Organization   "International Collaboration in Scientific and Operational Hydrology."
1976
William C. Ackermann   Illinois State Water Survey   "Forecasting Yes, Management Maybe."
1977
James P. Bruce   Inland Waters Directorate, Environment Canada   "New Directions in Hydrometeorology."
1980
Eugene L. Peck   Hydrologic Research Laboratory, National Weather Service, NOAA   "Design of Precipitation Networks."
1982
Ray K. Linsley   Linsley, Kraeger Associates, Ltd.   "Social and Political Aspects of Drought."
1983
Robert J. C. Burnash   River Forecast Center, National Weather Service, NOAA   "The Meaning and Challenge of Real-Time Data and Analysis Systems to Future Public Service Programs."
1985
Floyd A. Huff   Climate and Meteorology Section, Illinois State Water Survey   "Urban Hydrometeorology Review."
1988
Peter S. Eagleson   Massachusetts Institute of Technology   "Global Change, A Catalyst for the Development of Hydrologic Science."
1991
James C. I. Dooge   Centre for Water Resources Research, University College, Ireland   "Sensitivity of Runoff to Climate Change: A Hortonian Approach."
1993
Wilfried H. Brutsaert   Cornell University   "Horton, Pipe Hydraulics, and the Atmospheric Boundary Layer."
1995
Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe   Texas A&M University    "Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Soil Moisture Dynamics."
1997
Eugene M. Rasmusson   University of Maryland   "North American Hydrology: The Evolution of an Interdisciplinary Perspective."
1999
Rafael L. Bras   “for space-time characterization of precipitation, and other fields of interest to both hydrologists and meteorologists.”
The Bernhard Haurwitz Memorial Lecturer
Isaac M. Held   “for significant contributions to the understanding of waves in the atmosphere.”
1989
John M. Wallace   University of Washington   "Dynamics of Low-Frequency Atmospheric Variability."
1993
James R. Holton   University of Washington   "Stationary Planetary Waves."
1996
Brian J. Hoskins   University of Reading   "The Sub-Tropics, Descent and Anticyclones."
1997
Richard S. Lindzen   Massachusetts Institute of Technology   "Tides: Loose Ends and New Applications."
The Remote Sensing Lecturer
1991
David Atlas   NASA Goddard Space Flight Center   "Evolution: Bats, Radar, and Science."
1993
Verner E. Suomi   University of Wisconsin—Madison   "Future Weather Satellites: An International Approach."
1996
Richard M. Schotland   University of Arizona   "Active Remote Sensing and Undergraduate Education."
1997
Edgeworth R. Westwater   University of Colorado   "Remote Sensing of Tropospheric Temperature and Water Vapor by Integrated Observing Systems."
1998
William L. Smith   NASA Langley Research Center   "Satellite Remote Sensing—The Evolution of a Global Observing System."
1999
S. Harvey Melfi   “for sustained, outstanding contributions to laser remote sensing of the atmosphere.”
The Walter Orr Roberts Memorial Lecturer
1991
John E. Kutzbach   University of Wisconsin—Madison   "On Astronomical Theories of Climatic Change."
1995
Robert E. Dickinson   University of Arizona   "Land Surface Processes and Climate Modeling."
1996
Duncan C. Blanchard   State University of New York—Albany   "Serendipity, Scientific Discovery, and Project Cirrus."
1997
Syukuro Manabe   Princeton University   "Climate Variability of a Coupled Ocean—Atmosphere— Land Surface Model: Implications for the Detection of Global Warming."
1998
Bruce B. Hicks   NOAA Air Resources Laboratory   "Wind, Water, Earth, and Fire—A Return to an Aristotelian Environment."
1999
Richard C. J. Somerville   “for significant contributions to the understanding and discussion of global environmental change derived from multidisciplinary research activities.”
Special Awards and Citations
1957
Radio Station KSOK of Arkansas City, Kansas   "for its action in initiating a telephone call to the Weather Bureau Office in Wichita reporting that information had been received on tornadic activity near Maple City and Otto, Kansas. The tornado warning issued by the Wichita Office as a result of this call is believed to have saved the lives of at least six persons, possibly more."
Television Station WKY-TV of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma   "for their enthusiastic support of meteorology in their area. With a professional meteorologist serving as Publicity Director and Meteorologist for WKY-TV, the weather programs are found to be most interesting and emphasize progress made in meteorology. WKY-TV was also instrumental, several years back, in securing the reproduction rights to the now famous Corn Tornado movie film which they then made available to training agencies at cost."
Joseph Bartatto   "for his action in reporting severe weather and rumbling sound, possibly a tornado, in his neighborhood. Relayed to the Green Bay Weather Bureau Office, the report was verified by the State Police and a general warning issued to alert other communities in central Wisconsin. It is reasonable to believe that a considerable number of lives were saved as a result of his timely report."
Stuart Grazier Biger   "in recognition of his work during the Bryan, Texas, tornado of April 5, 1956. The timely warning which resulted from his study of the radar scope is believed to have saved the lives of a number of people that day."
1959
Maurice Levy   "in recognition of his courage and photographic ability in obtaining the outstanding movie of the Dallas tornado of April 2, 1957. This film has important scientific value since it is the first film that shows objects and debris in the tornado's circulation which can be followed in detail. Also, this film has been and will be used in tornado educational films which will lead to a better understanding by the public of the enormous fury of the tornado."
Jean Felix Piccard   "in recognition of his pioneering work in developing balloons for high-altitude research."
1960
U.S. Forest Service   "for its progressive approach in conducting studies of the effects of weather on the national forest resources."
Charles B. Moore, Malcolm D. Ross, and, posthumously, Lee Lewis   "for their recent and significant work in making important aerophysical observations from high-altitude balloons."
Walter Rue   "for the outstanding work in writing feature articles on the subject of weather and climate."
Nicholas Brango   "for his pioneering work in hurricane tracking and forecasting which has provided the basis for improved hurricane reconnaissance and warning methods."
1961
William W. Kellogg and Stanley M. Greenfield   "for their pioneering work in the planning of a meteorological satellite."
John C. Freeman and Archie M. Kahan   "for their pioneering work in the establishment of the Tornado Warning Radar Network."
1962
Werner A. Baum   "for his successful leadership in developing the Journal of Meteorology into a large publication of high international stature over a decade of very demanding editorial effort."
1964
Dean Blake   "for his distinguished service to meteorology over more than 60 years. Both in his half century of activity in the U.S. Weather Bureau at San Diego, including 30 years as Meteorologist in Charge, and his subsequent years of supposed retirement, during which he has served as consultant to the San Diego Department of Public Health, Mr. Blake has contributed notably to the advancement of the science of meteorology, the public understanding of its nature and significance, and the practical benefits of its application. In particular his studies of the structure and behavior of the temperature inversion over the California coast, published in 1928, were the first analysis of this important phenomenon. His courses in meteorology at San Diego State College have introduced the subject to many who subsequently made their careers in meteorology. For these many contributions over a long and outstanding career the American Meteorological Society presents a special award to Mr. Blake.
Reverend Adelhelm Hess, O.S.B.   "in recognition of his long and devoted service as a cooperative weather observer for the United States Weather Bureau. Voluntarily and without recompense, Father Hess has faithfully made observations at Conception, Missouri, for over 60 years. For his contribution to the national climatological record and to the total fund of research data, the American Meteorological Society presents this special award to Father Hess."
1965
Gordon D. Cartwright and Morton J. Rubin   "for their important contributions to international cooperation in meteorology. For almost a decade they have been concerned with international undertakings in meteorological research. During the International Geophysical Year each one spent a year at the Main Soviet Antarctic Station working with scientists from the Soviet Union. By their professional competence and personal characteristics they have done a great deal to enhance the image of American scientists."
1966
Gertrude M. Woods   "for her more than 60 years of devoted service as the official cooperative weather observer at Palmetto, Tennessee, continuing a family record begun in 1883 by her father. She was honored by the Weather Bureau for the faithful performance of her voluntary duty with the John Campanius Holm Award in 1960, with the Thomas Jefferson Award in 1965, and by President Johnson in a letter commending her for 'the careful collection of weather data over so long a period' and for her 'unselfish dedication in this important task.'"
1969
Fortune Magazine and Lawrence Lessing   "for the article 'Doing Something About the Weather—In a Big Way,' which, in providing an accurate and balanced account of current efforts of the world meteorological community to establish a global observational and research program aimed at extending the range and accuracy of weather predictions, exemplifies popular scientific writing at its best."
Station KICD, Spencer, Iowa   "in recognition of its public service in broadcasting during the period of severe weather over northwest Iowa on June 13, 1968, advisories which were instrumental in saving lives."
1970
Hydrologic Services of the ESSA Weather Bureau   "for providing early forecasts and warnings of the spring floods of 1969 in the upper midwest part of the nation, thereby permitting advance cooperative action by federal, state and local authorities and preventing great damage and loss of life."
Ferdinand C. Bates, posthumously   "for his pioneering efforts in severe storm research, and for his outstanding contribution to applied meteorology."
Howard H. Hanks, Jr., posthumously   "for his tireless efforts in research and applied meteorology and especially for his generosity in giving of himself and his ideas to others."
WMAQ-TV, Chicago, Illinois   "for outstanding public service in disseminating timely weather information, particularly on severe storms."
1971
George L. Hammond   "for his imaginative and effective leadership of the technically challenging application of forecasts to ship routing at the United States Navy Fleet Weather Central, Alameda, California."
Robert E. Cardinal   "for his forecasting skill and sensitivity to the needs of the public as Meteorologist in Charge of the National Weather Service Office in Klamath Falls, Oregon."
National Broadcasting Company   "for its Today television program for the excellent presentation of meteorological information which educates the public on the nature of weather and the importance of protecting the public against its hazards."
WKY Television System, Incorporated, of Oklahoma City   "for its sense of public responsibility in making available to the National Severe Storms Laboratory its transmitter tower for the study of the atmospheric layer near the ground.
Raymond E. Falconer and Raymond A. Wrightson   "for their imaginative exhibits on the Weather Services Centennial for the Albany, New York, area."
1972
Robert Jastrow   "for his dedication and achievement as first editor of the Society's Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences in guiding its development and growth to its present position as a leading national scientific publication and in broadening its scope of interest to include aeronomy and planetary atmospheres."
Francis W. Reichelderfer   "in appreciation of his lifetime of devotion to the American Meteorological Society as charter member, Fellow, and President" and "for his countless contributions to the weather services of the United States and the world."
Malcolm Rigby   "for his devoted and untiring service as the Editor of the Society's Meteorological and Geoastrophysical Abstracts since its initiation in 1950 and for his dedicated work on the documentation and retrieval of geophysical data."
1973
Agricultural (Fruit Frost) Weather Forecasters in Arizona and California   "in recognition of outstanding weather forecasts and advisory services to the agro-business interests in California and Arizona during the winter seasons of 1971 and 1972 which enabled owners to reduce losses of agricultural products substantially."
William H. Best, Jr.   "for unswerving dedication and support to principles of the American Meteorological Society, as exemplified by his promotion of close cooperation among the weather services and encouragement of greater Air Weather Service participation in the Society's activities."
James W. Reid, posthumously   "for originating and producing the program 'How s the Weather' in the TN Radio Network for over thirty years and for his efforts in organizing the North Carolina Chapter of the American Meteorological Society."
1974
Illinois State Water Survey   "for initiation, support and successful completion of imaginative research in applied meteorology dealing with storm, rainfall, and hail patterns, weather modification, and related hydrometeorological problems."
1975
Robert O. Reid   "for his untiring efforts and consummate editorial and scientific skills in bringing the Society's Journal of Physical Oceanography all the way from a dream to the status of a mature scientific journal in a few short years."
National Weather Service Office at Huntsville, Alabama   "for their timely and accurate warnings during the tornadic outbreak of April 3, 1974, in disregard of personal safety, maintaining information services that helped to minimize the impact of a series of vicious storms."
Det. 15, 15th Wea. Sq., 5th Wea. Wg., Air Weather Service, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio   "for providing timely and accurate observations and forecasts during the tornado disaster of April 3, 1974, to the American National Red Cross Dayton Area Chapter, to the city of Xenia, and to the 17th Bombardment Wing (SAC), which contributed to the safety of personnel and helped in the emergency relief operations."
1976
Albert W. Duckworth   "for his outstanding service to the people of Southern Louisiana by his untiring and knowledgeable coverage on WWL Radio and Television during the threat of Hurricane Carmen in September 1974."
Vincent J. Schaefer   "for his magnificent contributions to the atmospheric sciences: through his research and scholarship, through his education and motivation of young people, and through his leadership of the Atmospheric Sciences Reserch Center at the State University of New York at Albany."
1977
Viking Meteorology Flight Team: Seymour L. Hess, Team Leader, Florida State University; Jack A. Ryan, Deputy Team Leader, California State University at Fullerton; Thomas E. Chamberlain, TRW Defense and Space Systems Group; Harold L. Cole, National Center   "for the scientific and engineering achievement which has brought us daily weather reports from Mars. This new capability to compare the atmospheric dynamics of two planets marks a major and historic step forward in the science of meteorology."
John F. Henz and Vincent R. Scheetz   "for an outstanding example of the use of meteorological knowledge and radio in the public interest during the flash flood situation in the Big Thompson Canyon of Colorado on July 31 and August 1, 1976."
Radio Station KCOL, Ft. Collins, Colorado   "for an outstanding example of emergency programming to ensure prompt radio dissemination of critical meteorological information in the public interest during the flash flood situation in the Big Thompson Canyon of Colorado on July 31 and August 1, 1976."
Alan K. Betts, Stephen K. Cox, and Edward J. Zipser   "for outstanding contributions and leadership in the conception, documentation, and execution of the scientific aircraft program of the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment. They served with particular distinction in frequent assignments to the key role of Mission Scientist, and their skill, dedication, and enthusiasm set an example for all international participants."
1978
Morris Tepper   "for his extraordinary leadership in persuading the nations of the world to join in providing a global weather observing system based on space technology."
Detachment 4, 7th Weather Wing, Air Weather Service, Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma   "for its support to both Altus Air Force Base and Jackson County civil authorities during the multiple tornado outbreak of May 20, 1977, in southwestern Oklahoma. The detachment's constant advisories enabled civil authorities to alert the local populace in sufficient time to avoid death or serious injury."
1979
Robert B. Rice   "in recognition of his thorough research and forecasting skills which proved an indispensable contribution to the successful completion of the first Atlantic balloon crossing by the crew of the Double Eagle II."
Guy H. Gray, Jr., Benjamin Brown, William C. Henry, John E. Michener, and Leon Schirn   "for their early anticipation, prompt forecast, careful monitoring, and effective advice to the public, which greatly reduced loss of life in the Kansas City flash flood of September 12, 1977."
1981
National Weather Service Office, Wichita Falls, Texas   "for an exceptional specific prediction during the April 10, 1979, tornado outbreak which left approximately 20,000 persons homeless in the Wichita Falls area. The tornado warnings prevented injury and death."
1983
Mauna Loa Observatory, NOAA, Mauna Loa, Hilo, Hawaii   "for service to the scientific community by providing measurements of the chemical and physical background state of the atmosphere."
1984
Henry T. Harrison   "for his distinguished service over 60 years, from Kite Station observer to leader in the evolution of aeronautical meteorology, and his key role in founding the Society's Certified Consulting Meteorologists program, being CCM Number One. His many contributions to aviation safety and operating efficiency include research that advanced the widespread and effective use of airborne weather avoidance radar."
1985
Eric Sloane   "for pioneering contributions to public awareness of clouds, their beauty, complexity and scientific importance; for an artistic legacy to all who feel a sense of wonder when they look at a cloud-filled sky."
George P. Wadsworth and Joseph G. Bryan   "for outstanding foresight and achievements in statistical weather forecasting; for pioneering contributions ranging from orthogonal polynomial methods for objective weather map analysis to procedures underlying probability forecasts."
1986
J. Murray Mitchell, Jr.   "for devoted work as an Executive Editor of Weatherwise, as exemplified by his splendid efforts in translating difficult scientific information into layman's terms."
1987
Leonard W. Snellman   "for his extraordinarily skillful professional judgement in the application of meteorological science and technology to the strategic planning and tactical implementation of the pioneering global Voyager flight in December 1986."
1988
Jack C. Thompson   "for major contributions as an operational weather forecaster, teacher, and meteorological consultant over almost fifty years."
1989
Robert W. Burpee and Leonard W. Snellman   "for their major efforts in the successful initiation of the periodical, Weather and Forecasting."
Joseph O. Fletcher   "for outstanding exploration and research in polar meteorology."
1990
Richard A. Kerr   "for the consistently high quality of his articles in Science on developments and issues in the atmospheric sciences."
Henry Lansford   "for distinguished writing on meteorology, leading to increased public awareness and understanding of the subject."
1991
Frederick Sanders   "in recognition of lifelong contributions to the atmospheric sciences through personal research and effective education of generations of students."
1992
Ira W. Geer   "for his pioneering work to enhance meteorological education at the primary and secondary school levels."
Harry Van Loon   "for his outstanding record of careful and insightful observational studies of atmospheric phenomena over the past 35 years."
1993
Daniel L. Albritton and Robert T. Watson   "for notable efforts in organizing and conducting international assessments in ozone depletion and global change"
Robert W. Corell, J. Michael Hall, and Shelby G. Tilford   "for outstanding leadership in organizing the United States' Global Change Program."
National Hurricane Center, Miami, Florida   "for an outstanding demonstration, in the case of Hurricane Andrew, of the value of preparedness and accurate forecasting."
Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Guam   "for skill in forecasting Typhoon Omar and for great devotion to duty in the face of a devastating storm."
Central Pacific Hurricane Center, Honolulu, Hawaii   "for skillful forecasts of Hurricane Inki despite the paucity of data in the area of the storm's track."
National Weather Service Forecast Office, Miami, Florida   "for outstanding service to the citizens of South Florida during Hurricane Andrew."
National Weather Service Forecast Office, New Orleans, Louisiana   "for remarkable service to the citizens of coastal Louisiana during Hurricane Andrew."
National Weather Service Office, Lihue   "for superlative service to the citizens of the island of Kauai during Hurricane Iniki."
Bryan Norcross   "for using his meteorological education to prepare his station for Hurricane Andrew and to be a voice of hope throughout Southern Florida."
United States Air Force 1690th Weather Group (Provisional), Saudi Arabia   "for outstanding meteorological support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm under arduous conditions."
Kathleen C. Hale   "for her leadership in preparing the diverse municipalities of Dade County for a disaster such as Hurricane Andrew."
1994
William H. Hooke   "for extensive and extended contributions to the observational and theoretical aspects of atmospheric science."
1995
Edwin F. Danielsen   "for pioneering work using potential vorticity, ozone, and water vapor as tracers to infer the time-dependent three-dimensional structure of extratropical cyclones, and the nature of stratosphere troposphere exchange processes."
Alfred H. Woodcock   "for pioneering and sustaining research on the origin and role of sea-salt particles in the formation of rain, and for his novel approach both to studies of convection in the marine boundary layer and to Langmuir circulations in the sea."
1996
Roger B. Lukas and Peter J. Webster   "for their tireless leadership in the planning and execution of TOGA COARE and for fostering effective cooperation between meteorologists and oceanographers."
John R. Christy and Roy W. Spencer   "for developing a global, precise record of the earth's temperature from operational polar-orbiting satellites, fundamentally advancing our ability to monitor climate."
1997
The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group   "for pushing the limits of mesoscale weather forecasts in support of NASA's Space Shuttle mission for more than 15 years."
James F. W. Purdom, Dennis Chesters, and W. Paul Menzel   "for extraordinary leadership efforts in introducing information from the new GOES series to weather forecasters throughout the Western Hemisphere."
1998
Christopher S. Velden   "for his special efforts in providing mesoscale satellite datasets to support field studies and operational weather forecast centers nationally and internationally."
1999
Brian E. Doty   “for the development and implementation of techniques for graphic analysis and visualization of global data sets.”
Ants Leetmaa   “for outstanding leadership in promoting public awareness of El Niño and his contributions to making ENSO predictions practical.”
Michael J. McPhaden   “for contributions to monitoring of El Niño through completion and maintenance of the equatorial Pacific Ocean moored buoy network.”
Louis J. Boezi and Douglas H. Sargeant   “for their superb leadership and contributions to modernizing the National Weather Service.”
Louis J. Battan Author s Award
Thomas J. Kierein and John Buxton   “for their book Weather, a beautifully produced and informative book which will encourage the interest of young people in atmospheric science.”
1989
Craig F. Bohren   "for his popular book, Clouds in a Glass of Beer."
1990
Stephen H. Schneider   "for his book, Global Warming."
1992
John W. Firor   "for his popular book, The Changing Atmosphere, which clearly explains the complex relations between anthropogenic atmospheric effects and societal issues."
1993
Robert Marc Friedman   "for providing an authoritative account of the contributions of Vilhelm Bjerknes and contemporary pioneers to meteorology."
1994
Jack Williams   "for his USA TODAY, The Weather Book, a scientifically authentic, easy-to-understand, text with novel visuals."
1995
Edward N. Lorenz   "for his book entitled, The Essence of Chaos, which defines chaos and illustrates its special properties in a way that a thoughtful, nonspecialist audience can understand."
1996
Thomas E. Graedel and Paul J. Crutzen   "for their book entitled, Atmosphere, Climate and Change, an authoritative and beautifully illustrated introduction to the role of the atmosphere in global change."
1997
Jack Fishman and Robert Kalish   "for their book The Weather Revolution, an exciting account of recent innovations in forecasting."
1998
Zbigniew Sorbjan   "for his book Hands-On Meteorology, which combines a refreshing mix of science experiments with historical perspective."
The Banner I. Miller Award
1999
John E. Molinari   “for his lead authorship of two outstanding contributions to our understanding of tropical cyclogenesis and hurricane intensity published during the years 1995–97: ‘Potential Vorticity, Easterly Waves, and Eastern Pacific Tropical Cyclogenesis’ (MWR, Vol. 125) and ‘External Influences on Hurricane Intensity. Part III: Potential Vorticity Structure’ (JAS, Vol. 52).”
1977
Charles J. Neumann and Miles B. Lawrence   for their paper, "An Operational Experiment on the Statistical Dynamical Prediction of Tropical Cyclone Motion."
1979
Lloyd Shapiro   for his paper, "Tropical Storm Formation from Easterly Waves: A Criterion for Development."
1981
William M. Frank   for his papers, "The Structure and Energetics of Tropical Cyclones, Parts I and II."
1982
James C. Sadler, University of Hawaii   for his paper, "Mid-Season Typhoon Development and Intensity Changes and the Upper Tropospheric Trough."
1984
Yoshio Kurihara and Robert E. Tuleya   for their paper, "A Numerical Study on the Effects of Environmental Flow on Tropical Storm Genesis."
1985
Greg J. Holland   for his papers, "Tropical Cyclone Motion: Environmental Interaction Plus a Beta Effect," and "Tropical Cyclone Motion: A Comparison of Theory and Observation."
1986
Mark DeMaria   for his paper, "Tropical Cyclone Motion in a Nondivergent Barotropic Model."
1989
Mark DeMaria   for his paper, "Tropical Cyclone Track Prediction with a Barotropic Spectral Model."
1992
Kerry A. Emanuel and Richard Rotunno   "for the best contribution to the science of hurricane and tropical weather forecasting published during the years 1986–1990."
1994
William M. Gray, Christopher W. Landsea, Paul W. Mielke, Jr., and Kenneth J. Berry   "for the best contribution to the science of Hurricane and Tropical Weather Forecasting published during the years 1990–1992. 'Predicting Atlantic Seasonal Hurricane Activity 6–11 Months in Advance' (Weather and Forecasting, Vol. 7)."
1995
Thomas A. Guinn and Wayne H. Schubert   "for the best contribution to the science of Hurricane and Tropical Weather Forecasting published during the years 1993–1994. 'Hurricane Spiral Bands' (Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, Vol. 50)."
1998
Morris A. Bender, Rebecca J. Ross, Robert E. Tuleya, and Yoshio Kurihara   "for the best contribution to the science of hurricane and tropical weather forecasting published during the years 1992–1994. 'Improvements in Tropical Cyclone Track and Intensity Forecasts Using the GFDL Initialization System' (Monthly Weather Review, Vol. 121)."
The Robert Leviton Award
1987
Gregory Byrne   "for his contributions to the development of balloon-borne corona probes to measure thunderstorm electric fields."
1990
Haflidi H. Jonsson   "for his paper on an 'Oscillatory Anemometer.'"
1994
Igor Gonta   "for his paper describing a calibrated Franklin Chimes to measure atmospheric potential."
1996
Scott J. Richardson   "for his papers on simulation and analysis of the problem of coupling sensors to the atmosphere."
1998
Seiji Kato   "for his papers evaluating the performance of radiometers at a field site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program."
The Max A. Eaton Prize
1976
Steven Payne and Mary M. McGarry   University of Washington   for their paper, "The Relationship of Satellite Inferred Convective Activity to Easterly Waves over Western Equatorial Africa and the Adjacent Ocean during Phase 3 of GATE." (Presented as the Simpson Weather Associates Award for the best student paper at the 10th Technical Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology of the American Meteorological Society.)
1977
Albert G. Boulanger, University of Florida, and Michael W. Maier, Florida State University   for their paper, "On the Frequency of Cloud-to-Ground Lightning from Tropical Cumulonimbus Clouds."
Clifford A. Mass   University of Washington   for his paper, "The Dynamics and Origin of African Easterly Waves."
1979
Peter R. Bannon   National Center for Atmospheric Research   for his paper, "Extratropical Forcing of the East African Jet."
1981
Edwin Nuñez   Colorado State University   for his paper, "Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change."
1982
Mark DeMaria   Colorado State University   for his paper, "Application of the Spectral Method to Tropical Cyclone Modeling."
Greg J. Holland   Colorado State University   for his paper, "A Precursor to Tropical Cyclone Intensity Variations."
1984
John R. Anderson   Colorado State University   for his paper, "Low Frequency Modes of the Tropical Troposphere."
Robert T. Merrill   Colorado State University   for his paper, "Characteristics of the Tropical Cyclone Outflow Layer."
1985
V. Mohan Karyampudi   The Pennsylvania State University   for his paper, "On the Mechanisms of West African Jets: A Numerical Study of the Saharan Air Layer and Easterly Waves."
1987
Candice Weatherford   Colorado State University   for her paper, "Typhoon Structural Evolution."
1989
Jong-Jin Baik   North Carolina State University   for his paper, "Tropical Cyclone Simulations with the Betts Convective Adjustment Scheme."
1992
Christopher W. Landsea   Colorado State University   "for the best student paper presented at the 19th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, Miami, Florida."
1994
Elizabeth A. Ritchie   Monash University   "for the best student paper presented at the 20th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, San Antonio, Texas. 'Contributions by Mesoscale Convective Systems to the formation of Tropical Cyclones.'"
1995
J. Dominique Möller   "for the best student paper presented at the 21st Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, Miami, Florida. 'Diagnostic Application of the Asymmetric Balance Theory for Tropical Cyclone.'"
Randall J. Kallenbach   "for the best student paper presented at the 21st Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, Miami, Florida. 'Symmetrization and Hurricane Motion in an Asymmetric Balance Model.'"
1998
Anantha Aiyyer   "for the best student paper presented at the 22nd Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, Fort Collins, Colorado. 'Interaction of Tropical Cyclone Outflow Layer Potential Vorticity Anomalies.'"
Arlene G. Laing   "for the best student paper presented at the 22nd Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, Fort Collins, Colorado. 'The Large Scale Environment of Mesoscale Convective Complexes: Comparisons with Other Deep Convective Weather Systems.'"
The Spiros G. Geotis Prize
1996
Lawrence D. Carey   Colorado State University   for his paper "Positive Cloud-to-Ground Lightning in Severe Hailstorms: A Multiparameter Radar Study."
1998
Sabine Göke   Swiss Federal Institute of Technology   for her paper, "Aggregation and Breakup of Hydrometeors in the Melting Layer. "
Eszter J. Barthazy   Swiss Federal Institute of Technology   for her paper, "Microphysical Properties of Hydrometeors within the Melting Layer. "
The Father James B. Macelwane Annual Awards in Meteorology
1999
Jeremy Moore   North Carolina State University   for his paper, "Analysis of a Cold Front Aloft with WSR-88D Doppler Radar Velocity Azimuth Display Wind Profile."
1960
William E. Shenk   The Pennsylvania State University   for his paper, "Guidance-Vector System of Forecasting Hurricane Motion." (First Prize)
Joel Myers   The Pennsylvania State University   for his paper, "Snowfall Variations in Philadelphia." (Second Prize)
Francis P. W. Ho   University of Hawaii   for his paper, "The Possibilities of Fresh Water Fish Cultivation in Southern Vietnam." (Third Prize)
1963
John B. Armstrong   University of British Columbia, Canada   for his paper, "Forest Fire Forecasts, Fire Weather, and the Fire Danger Index in British Columbia." (First Prize)
Francis W. Lemire   Assumption University, Windsor, Ontario, Canada   for his paper, "Winds on the Great Lakes." (Second Prize)
1964
Charles B. Pyke   University of California—Los Angeles   for his paper, "The Role of Air–Sea Interactions in the Development of Cyclones." (First Prize)
Marlies Oberlander   University of California, Los Angeles   for his paper, "On the Heat Transport by Ocean Currents." (Second Prize)
Walter A. Lyons   Saint Louis University   for his paper, "Radiation, TIROS III, and the Mesoscale." (Third Prize)
Edward E. Hindman II   University of Utah   for his paper, "Development of a Continuous Natural Supercooled Cloud Particle Chamber." (Honorable Mention)
1965
William L. Woodley   University of California—Los Angeles   for his paper, "Computations of Cloud Growth Related to the Seeding of Tropical Cumuli." (First Prize)
John R. Dickson   Texas A&M University   for his paper, "A Study of Similarity Profiles of Temperature and Wind Speed in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer." (Second Prize)
Edward E. Hindman II   Colorado State University   for his paper, "The Phase Change in an Artificial Supercooled Cloud upon Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Nucleation." (Third Prize)
Joseph Hilary Golden   University of California—Los Angeles   for his paper, "The Potential Dewpoint Field as a Forecast of Convective Precipitation." (Honorable Mention)
1966
Edward E. Hindman II   Colorado State University   for his paper, "Theoretical Investigation of Techniques Using Dry Ice for the Dissipation of Supercooled Fogs —4°C and Warmer." (First Prize)
Ann E. Gargett   University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada   for her paper, "Long-Term Fluctuations in the Toronto Temperature and Precipitation Record." (Second Prize)
D. W. Hartlieb   State University of New York—Fredonia   for his paper, "Ground Observations of Warm Cloud Emission." (Third Prize)
1968
Peter H. Hildebrand   University of Chicago   for his paper, "An Examination of a Cumulus Cloud Width Height Measure under the Effects of Seeding." (First Prize)
Andrew J. Heymsfield   State University of New York—Fredonia   for his paper, "Snow Crystal Types Observed in Snow Squalls." (Second Prize)
1969
I. R. Graham   University of Toronto, Canada   for his paper, "An Analysis of Turbulence Statistics at Fort Wayne, Indiana." (First Prize)
Victor F. Morris   University of Washington   for his paper, "A Study of Mesoscale Mountain Barrier Effects in Western Washington and Vancouver Island." (Second Prize)
Andrew J. Heymsfield   State University of New York—Fredonia   for his paper, "Redistribution of Snowfall in Lake Effect Snow Squalls by Ridges and Valleys to the Lee of Lake Erie." (Third Prze)
1970
Andrew J. Heymsfield   State University of New York—Fredonia   for his paper, "Snow Crystal Analysis of the Effectiveness of Seeding a Lake Erie Snow Squall on December 14, 1966." (First Prize)
Carlyle H. Wash   University of Wisconsin   for his paper, "The Formation of a Convective Layer during Cyclogenesis." (Second Prize)
Boris Weisman   Downsview, Ontario, Canada   for his paper, "Air Pollution Survey for Hamilton, Ontario." (Third Prize)
1971
Dean G. Duffy   Case Institute of Technology   for his paper, "Approximate Analytic Solution to the Growth of Nonfreezing Droplets in a Supersaturated Updraft." (First Prize)
Sharon E. Nicholson   University of Wisconsin   for her paper, "Paleographic Reconstructions and Possible Circulation Patterns from Cambrian to Quarternary Periods." (Second Prize)
1972
Robert M. Friedman   New York University   for his paper, "On the Influence of Traveling Planetary-Scale Waves on Absorption in the Lower Ionosphere." (First Prize)
1973
Louis W. Uccellini   University of Wisconsin   for his paper, "Surface Divergence and Convergence Fields Associated with Midwestern Convective Systems." (First Prize)
Mary Ann Hrivnak   The Pennsylvania State University   for her paper, "Fog Dispersal Methods Applicable to Harrisburg–York Airport." (Second Prize)
Douglas Beadle   Kirkwood Community College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa   for his paper, "Reliability of the Analogue Method in Long-Range Forecasting." (Third Prize)
1974
Robert M. Thompson, Jr.   Florida State University   for his paper, "The Diurnal Variability of Severe Local Storms in New England." (First Prize)
David B. Gilhousen   Florida State University   for his paper, "An Initialization Scheme for a Hurricane Model." (Second Prize)
1975
Paul W. Greiman   Florida State University   for his paper, "The Meteorology of Mars." (First Prize)
John S. Jensenius, Jr.   Millersville State College   for his paper, "Factors Controlling the Percentage of Solar Radiation Transmitted through a Clear Atmosphere." (Second Prize)
1976
Stephen J. Colucci   State University of New York—Albany   for his paper, "A Study of East Coast Winter Cyclones, 1964–1973." (First Prize)
Susan A. Ducey   Saint Louis University   for her paper, "The First Step The Meteorological Contributions of the Seventeenth Century." (Second Prize)
Nancy E. Westcott   University of Virginia   for her paper, "On Cumulus Mergers." (Third Prize)
1977
Jeffrey D. Hawkins   Florida State University   for his paper, "A Study of the Mesoscale Wind Circulation in a Land Sea Breeze Regime." (First Prize)
David Schachterle   University of Colorado   for his paper, "Weather Modification: The Need for Guidelines on the International Level." (Second Prize)
1978
Paul E. Ciesielski   Purdue University   for his paper, "The Influence of a Synoptic-Scale Cyclone on Boundary Layer Winds over Lake Michigan in Early Summer, 1976." (First Prize)
Frederick E. Brennan   Purdue University   for his paper, "The Climatology of Cyclones and Anticyclones in the Upper Mississippi and Ohio Valleys and Great Lakes Region, 1950–74." (Second Prize)
Kevin R. Knupp   Iowa State University   for his paper, "An Analysis of the June 13, 1976, Central Iowa Tornadoes." (Second Prize)
1979
John R. Lanzante   Rutgers University   for his paper, "An Investigative Study of the January Thaw Phenomenon." (First Prize)
Daniel C. David   University of Virginia   for his paper, "Geophysical Aspects of a Large Iceberg Tow." (Second Prize)
1980
Jay W. Schlegel and Gerard K. Butch   The Pennsylvania State University   for their paper, "The Barrens: Central Pennsylvania's Year-Round Deep Freeze." (First Prize)
Kevin A. Mundell   Augustana College   for his paper, "Urban Heat Island: A Quad Cities Study." (Second Prize)
1981
Patricia M. Dare   Purdue University   for her paper, "A Study of the Severity of the Midwestern Winters of 1977 and 1978 Using Heating Degree Days Determined for Both Measured and Wind Chill Temperatures." (First Prize)
Christian J. Grund   City College of the City University of New York   for his paper, "A Review of the History, Development, and Current State of the Art of Remote Sensing of the Vertical Thermal Structure in the Atmosphere." (Second Prize)
1982
Keith W. Dixon   Rutgers University   for his paper, "A Study of the Influence of Weather Conditions on Daily Suicide Incidents in New York City: 1974 through 1979." (First Prize)
Alan S. Tetenbaum   The Pennsylvania State University   for his paper, "An Added Tool for Predicting Thunderstorms—The Method of Minimum Temperature." (Second Prize)
1983
David M. Legler   Florida State University   for his paper, "Empirical Orthogonal Function Analysis of Wind Vectors Over the Tropical Pacific Region." (First Prize)
Paul J. Meyer   Saint Louis University   for his paper, "An Analysis of Statistical Structure During the First Regional-Scale SESAME 79 Experiment (AVE-SESAME I)." (Second Prize)
1984
Paul G. Wolyn   Rutgers University   for his paper, "A Model to Estimate the Washout of Hydrogen Chloride from Plumes." (First Prize)
Barbara A. Chance   Purdue University   for her paper, "A 500 mb Analysis of Winter 1977–78 Using Trough/Ridge Diagrams." (Second Prize)
Richard A. Fulton   Purdue University   for his paper, "An Analysis of the Surface Circulation Features in the South Pacific during FGGE, January 1979." (Second Prize)
1985
Craig R. Burfeind   Purdue University   for his paper, "Measurements and Analysis of Atmospheric Radiation." (First Prize)
Jeffrey S. Tilley   The Pennsylvania State University   for his paper, "Budyko's Model of the Thermal Regime Discussion and Implementation on a Minicomputer." (Second Prize)
1986
Wendy E. Schreiber   Metropolitan State College   for her paper, "Case Studies of Two Thunderstorms Initiated by Boundary Layer Convergence." (First Prize)
Jose D. Fuentes   Millersville University   for his paper, "Microclimate Plant and Yield." (Second Prize)
Luther A. Carroll III   University of Virginia   for his paper, "Objective Temperature Forecasting for the Central Virginia Piedmont." (Third Prize)
1987
Haig Iskenderian   State University of New York at Albany   for his paper, "Three-Dimensional Airflow and Precipitation Structure in a Non-Deepening Cyclone." (First Place)
Christopher W. Landsea   University of California at Los Angeles   for his paper, "A Quantitative Comparison of Two BASIN Lidar Images." (Second Place)
J. Todd Hawes   University of Virginia   for his paper, "A Study of 500 MB Cutoff Cyclones for 1950–1957 and 1980–1985: Frequencies of Occurrence, Momentum Transport Relationships and Their Formations near the Rocky Mountains." (Third Place)
Brad W. Orr   University of Nebraska—Lincoln   for his paper, "North American Grassland Wind Frequency Gradients." (Third Place)
John W. Conway   Metropolitan State College   (Honorable Mention)
1988
Anton Seimon   State University of New York at Albany   for his paper, "Large-Amplitude Gravity Waves: An Unclassified Type of Storm." (First Place)
Douglas K. Miller   University of Washington   for his paper, "Comparison between Estimates of Precipitable Water Derived from SMMR Satellite Measurements and Upper Air Data during FGGE." (Second Place)
1989
Renee A. Pruett   University of Wisconsin—Madison   for her paper, "University of Wisconsin Severe Storms Intercept Project: A Study of a Weakly-Forced Squall Line in Oklahoma." (First Place)
Jay P. Breidenbach   Florida State University   for his paper, "EOFS of Windstress over the Indian Ocean (1977–1985)." (Second Place)
1990
Maribeth Stolzenburg   State University of New York at Albany   for her paper, "Characteristics of the Bipole Pattern of Lightning Locations Observed in 1988 Thunderstorms." (First Place)
Gregory J. Hakim   State University of New York at Albany   for his paper, "The Eastern United States Sidedoor Cold Front: A Case Study of an Intense Atmospheric Density Current." (Second Place)
Bruce B. Smith   University of Michigan   for his paper, "An Analysis of Sea-Level Cyclone Errors Occurring in the NMC NGM from December 1987 to March 1988." (Third Place)
1991
Richard D. Knabb   Purdue University   for his paper, "The Role of Vorticity in an Explosively Deepening Extratropical Cyclone." (First Place)
Gregory J. Hakim   State University of New York at Albany   for his paper, "An Analysis of the Northern Hemisphere 1000–500-hPa Thickness Field for January and July: 1958–1984." (Second Place)
Russell S. McCormack   United States Naval Academy   for his paper, "Explosive Cyclogenesis: A Case Study of the Veteran's Day Storm of 11–12 November 1987." (Third Plce)
Douglas A. Speheger   Purdue University   for his paper, "The Updated Climatology of Indiana Tornadoes, 1953 to 1989." (Third Place)
Shane D. Mayor   Millersville University   (Honorable Mention)
1992
David M. Babb   University of Kansas   for his paper, "Effects of Environmental Lapse Rates on the Formation of the Denver Cyclone: A Numerical Study." (First Place)
Robert A. Velasco   Purdue University   for his paper, "Diagnosis of Moisture Parameters in the Tropics Using Two Estimates of Precipitation Rates from 1 June 1984–31 May 1987." (Second Place)
Joseph Paluszek   The City College of the City University of New York   for his paper, "The Warm Snow Phenomenon." (Third Place)
Robert F. Rogers   University of Virginia   for his paper, "The Effect of Coastline Curvature on the Weakening of Atlantic Tropical Cyclones." (Third Place)
1993
Susan S. Minton   U.S. Naval Academy   for her paper, "An Investigation into the Causative Mechanisms for Explosive Cyclone Development over the Atlantic." (First Place)
Thomas M. Renkevens   Millersville University   for his paper, "An Observational Study of the Relationship of the Great Plains Low Level Jet and Antecedent Cloud Cover and Rainfall." (Second Place)
David R. Stettner   Purdue University   for his paper, "Characteristics of Temperature and Vorticity Advection during Extratropical Cyclone Development." (Third Place)
1994
David L. Montroy   University of Oklahoma   for his paper, "On the Relation of North American Precipitation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation." (First Place)
Todd A. Hutchinson   State University of New York at Albany   for his paper, "A Climatology of Alberta Clippers and an Analysis of a Great Lakes Cyclone." (Second Place)
Susan L. Howard   Rutgers University   for her paper, "Analysis of High-Latitude Hydrologic Cycle with a Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Model." (Third Place)
1995
Greg E. Mann   The University of Michigan   for his paper, "Diagnosing the Effects of the Great Lakes on an Alberta Clipper." (First Place)
Michael W. Gleeson   U.S. Naval Academy   for his paper, "Correlation of Coral Bleaching Events and Remotely Sensed Sea Surface Temperatures." (Second Place)
Michael A. Bell   University of Oklahoma   for his paper, "Temporal Variations in the Characteristics of Rainfall Disturbances of the West African Sahel: 1951–1990." (Third Place)
Todd S. Richards   The Florida State University   for his paper, "Marginal Probabilities for Florida Precipitation Related to ENSO." (Honorable Mention)
1996
Daniel P. Guertin   Purdue University   for his paper, "Heating and Precipitation Rates over the Equatorial Pacific Ocean." (First Place)
Timothy M. Winter   United States Naval Academy   for his paper, "The Development of an Operational Global Ocean Climatology through the Use of Remotely Sensed Sea Surface Temperature." (Second Place)
1997
Matthew D. Eastin   Purdue University   for his paper, "Climatology of the Kinetic Energy Associated with the Subtropical Jet Stream Over the Australian-South Pacific Region." (First Place)
Paul M. Markowski   The Pennsylvania State University   for his paper, "The Meteorological Aspects of the 27 July 1994 Mid-Atlantic Tornado Outbreak." (Second Place)
Brian A. Cosgrove   Cornell University   for his paper, "Lake Effect Snow in the Finger Lakes Region." (Third Place)
1998
Mark C. Bove   The Florida State University   for his paper, "Impacts of ENSO on United States Tornadic Activity."
The Howard T. Orville Scholarship in Meteorology
1999
Corene J. Matyas   Clarion University of Pennsylvania   
1965
Daniel L. Smith   Florida State University   
1966
James P. Charba   University of Texas   
1967
Robert L. Gall   The Pennsylvania State University   
1970
Allen C. Dittenhoefer   Cornell University   
1971
Cary B. Schudy   Florida State University   
1972
Lawrence J. Lewis   New York University   
1973
John A. Pollack   The Pennsylvania State University   
1974
John A. Toth   The Pennsylvania State University   
1975
Daniel Keyser   The Pennsylvania State University   
1976
Judith A. Todd   The Pennsylvania State University   
1977
Bradley R. Colman   Montana State University   
1978
Leo J. Donner   University of Michigan   
1979
Ellen M. Salmon   Purdue University   
1980
Patricia M. Dare   Purdue University   
1981
Andrew J. Spry   The Pennsylvania State University   
1982
Linda M. Berens   Iowa State University   
1983
Barbara A. Chance   Purdue University   
1984
Michael I. Biggerstaff   University of Texas   
1985
Stephen Jascourt   University of Michigan   
1986
Claire A. Woolley   Purdue University   
1987
Douglas K. Miller   Purdue University   
1988
Juliana G. Minkowitz   Barnard College, Columbia University   
1989
Stephen J. Vavrus   Purdue University   
1990
Jonathan A. Foley   University of Wisconsin   
1991
Donna M. Crider   University of Oklahoma   
1992
William M. Briggs   Central Michigan University   
1993
Cristine M. Reese   Purdue University   
1994
Imke Durre   Yale University   
1995
Philippe Rolland   University of Hawaii at Manoa   
1996
Jeffrey R. Brandberg   University of Kansas   
1997
Michael C. Coniglio   State University of New York at Oswego   
1998
Jamie A. Picardy   Michigan State University   
The Howard H. Hanks, Jr., Scholarship in Meteorology
1999
Michele D. Balcom   State University of New York at Stony Brook   
1973
Robert M. Thompson, Jr.   Florida State University   
1974
Daniel Keyser   The Pennsylvania State University   
1975
David L. Harper   University of Texas—Austin   
1976
David D. Adamec   Florida State University   
1977
Rae Ann Eversole   Cook College of Rutgers University   
1978
Richard C. Deininger   State University of New York—Albany   
1979
Dorothea G. Nase   Millersville State College   
1980
Robert T. Merrill   Texas A&M University   
1981
Kenneth D. Walker   U.S. Naval Academy   
1982
Kathy A. Perbeck   Lyndon State College   
1983
Richard A. Fulton   Purdue University   
1984
Robert X. Black III and Miriam Blaskovich   McGill University   
1985
Pamela Camara   University of Lowell   
Timothy J. Schott   City University of New York   
1986
Jonathan E. Martin   Saint Louis University   
1987
William A. Gallus, Jr.   The Pennsylvania State University   
1988
Russell E. Treadon, Jr.   Florida State University   
1989
Scott A. Braun   San Francisco State University   
1990
Megan McKay   University of California—Davis   
1991
David A. Waite   Plymouth State College   
1992
Donald M. Rolfson   Purdue University   
1993
Jeffrey A. DeToro   Purdue University   
1994
Matthew E. Pyle   University of California—Davis   
1995
Gregory E. Gahrs   Cook College of Rutgers University   
Sara A. Michelson   The Pennsylvania State University   
1996
Michael M. Whitney   Yale University   
1997
Kevin D. Dalton   Saint Louis University   
1998
Alana M. Althaus   Humboldt State University   
The Paul H. Kutschenreuter Scholarship
1999
Jessica D. Lundquist   University of California—Davis   
1992
Geoffrey D. Considine   Georgia Institute of Technology   
1993
Ernest R. Toracinta   University of Massachusetts at Lowell   
1994
Shannon E. White   North Carolina State University   
1995
James R. Winterle   University of Arizona   
1996
Cristina A. Kaufman   University of Oklahoma   
1997
Keith K. Contre   North Carolina State University   
1998
Daniel S. Cohan   Harvard University   
The Dr. Pedro Grau Undergraduate Scholarship
1999
Meredith Renee Lips   Iowa State University   
Crystalyne R. Liska   Valparaiso University   
Paul E. Roundy   Utah State University   
1995
Curtis N. James   University of Arizona   
1996
Jeffrey A. Zogg   Iowa State University   
1997
Carl D. Johnson   Texas A&M University   
1998
William Blair Lamothe   University of California at Riverside   
Christopher J. Liller   The Pennsylvania State University   
The AMS 75th Anniversary Scholarship
1999
John D. Fulton   Texas A&M University   
1995
Julie M. Caron   The Florida State University   
1996
Joseph A. acDonald   The University of Michigan   
1997
Alison Gillis   University of Connecticut   
1998
Michael J. Wilson   Valparaiso University   
The Mark J. Schroeder Scholarship in Meteorology
1999
Scott M. Steiger   State University of New York at Oswego   
1997
Diana Lynn Sorensen   Iowa State University   
1998
Marc Jason Weinberg   University of Oklahoma   
The Richard and Helen Hagemeyer Scholarship
1999
Kyle A. Beatty   University of Oklahoma   
1997
Brett Weston Newkirk   The University of Arizona   
1998
Callie Lynn Buchanan   Florida Atlantic University   
AMS/Industry Minority Scholarships
1999
Remeisha D. Shade   The Florida State University (AMS/Weather Channel)   
Paul M. Iniguez   St. Cloud State University (AMS/Computer Sciences Corporation)   
Erika M. Sharp   University of California   
Wesley C. Acosta   Massachusetts Institute of Technology (AMS/National Environmental Satellite Data Information Service   
Megan L. Rock   Ohio University (AMS/National Environmental Satellite Data Information Service   
Daniel J. Fuentes   North Carolina State University (Larry R. Johnson Memorial Minority Scholarship)   
Tara L. Arness   University of Richmond   
Lindsay G. Burge   University of Kansas   
Russell L. Hudgins   University of Virginia   
1993
Martin J. Cole   Morehouse College   
Shani M. Phillips   Stanford University   
1994
Hubert C. Ho   Harvard University   
Violeta Moldonado   University of California—Davis   
Amy M. Tolliver   Northern Illinois State University   
1995
Jeremy B. Alexander   Air Force Academy   
Errol L. Brown   University of Miami   
Janessa C. Cobb   Hawaii Pacific University   
1996
Heather A. Elenbaas   Iowa State University   
Enrique E. Urueta II   The College of William and Mary (AMS/Weather Channel)   
David J. Williams   University of Oklahoma   
Angela J. Yu   Massachusetts Institute of Technology   
1997
Mindy A. Chavez   Texas A&M University   
Thomas Ferede   Dartmouth College (AMS/PRC Inc.)   
Bradley C. Navarro   University of Oklahoma   
Aaron S. Pratt   North Carolina State University (AMS/ Weather Channel)   
Anthony J. Torres   North Carolina State University   
1998
Adam R. Abate   Harvard University   
Wendy L. Bleyl   Texas A&M University   
Elita Y. Cheung   Stanford University (AMS/Weather Channel)   
Angela C. Hughes   University of Oklahoma   
Jeffrey P. Lowther   Texas A&M University (AMS/Hughes Santa Barbara Remote Sensing)   
Stacy A. McCallan   Brown University (AMS/Computer Sciences Corporation)   
Anthony Nguyen   University of Oklahoma (AMS/PRC Inc.)   
AMS/Industry Graduate Fellowships
1999
Crystaline R. Liska   Colorado State University (Silicon Graphics Inc.)   
Matthew J. Hostutler   University of Maryland (Raytheon Systems Company)   
Justin A. Cox   University of Utah (ITT Industries Aerospace/Communications Division)   
Francesco Fiondella   Columbia University (Space Systems/Loral)   
Julie L. Demuth   Colorado State University (GTE Government Systems)   
Howard I. Berger   University of Wisconsin—Madison (Lockheed Martin Missiles & Space)   
Wynn W. Yin    University of California, Berkeley (Hughes Space and Communications Company)   
Jill C. Derby   University of Delaware (NOAA’s Office of Global Programs)   
John M. Haynes   Colorado State University (NOAA’s Office of Global Programs)   
Gregory J. Braun   (DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program)   
Paul E. Roundy   The Pannsylvania State University (DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program)   
Curtis R. Alexander   The University of Oklahoma (National Weather Service)   
Daniel R. Jamieson   Texas A&M University (NASA’s Earth Science Enterprise)   
Christopher M. McAloon   The University of Oklahoma (NASA’s Earth Science Enterprise)   
John E. Strack   Colorado State University (NASA’s Earth Science Enterprise)   
Elizabeth C. Wood   The Pennsylvania State University (NASA’s Earth Science Enterprise)   
Michele D. Balcom   The Pennsylvania State University (National Science Foundation Division of Atmospheric Sciences)   
Kyle A. Beatty   The University of Oklahoma (National Science Foundation Division of Atmospheric Sciences)   
Daniel T. Lindsey   Colorado State University (National Science Foundation Division of Atmospheric Sciences)   
Kevin P. Connors   Johns Hopkins University (Office of Naval Research)   
Brian P. Reen   The Pennsylvania State University (Office of Naval Research)   
Andrea L. Glaza   Colorado State University (American Meteorological Society)   
1991
Brian A. Colle   University of Washington (Computer Sciences Corporation)   
Caryn L. Dean   The Pennsylvania State University (GE Astro Space Division)   
Robert Jacob   University of Wisconsin—Madison (Cray Research, Inc)   
Stephen E. Marshall   University of Washington (PRC Inc.)   
James A. Shepard   The Florida State University (TRW Foundation)   
1992
David M. Babb   The Pennsylvania State University (PRC Inc.)   
Andrew Humphrey   Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cray Research, Inc.)   
Kelly McNerney   University of Wisconsin—Madison (Computer Sciences Corporation)   
Martin Murphy   University of Arizona (Space Systems/Loral)   
Christopher Plouff   Michigan Technological University (TRW Foundation)   
George Pouliot   North Carolina State University (Hughes Information Technology Company)   
Robert L. M. Rausch   Purdue University (Paramax Systems Corporation)   
John Schrage   Purdue University (ITT Aerospace Communications Division)   
James Turner   University of Washington (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
1993
Mark A. Askelson   University of Oklahoma (Cray Research, Inc.)   
Kevin C. Baggett   The Pennsylvania State University (PRC Inc.)   
Kyle W. Blasch   Massachusetts Institute of Technology (TRW Foundation)   
Gregory M. Fall   University of Michigan (ITT Aerospace Communications Division)   
M. Thomas Filiaggi   Arizona State University (Computer Sciences Corporation)   
H. David Gold   University of Arizona (Hughes Information Technology Company)   
David L. Montroy   University of Oklahoma (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
David S. Myers   University of Washington (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
John J. Persing   Colorado State University (Martin Marietta Astro Space)   
Raymond A. Shaw   The Pennsylvania State University (Paramax Systems Corporation)   
Scott C. Sheridan   Texas A&M University (Space Systems/Loral)   
1994
Bruce T. Anderson   Scripps Institution (Space Systems/Loral)   
Eyad H. Atallah   State University of New York at Albany (GTE's Federal Systems Division)   
Jerald A. Brotzge   University of Oklahoma (Unisys Corporation   
Kathleen A. Edwards   Scripps Institution (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
Eric R. Hilgendorf   Colorado State University (ITT Aerospace Communications Division)   
Robert H. Kent   University of Florida (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
Brett E. McDonald   University of Utah (Cray Research, Inc.)   
John J. Mewes   University of Oklahoma (Martin Marietta Astro Space)   
Brian D. Skinner   University of Oklahoma (Hughes Information Technology Company)   
Jason Stiff   University of Utah (PRC Inc.)   
Sharon L. Sullivan   University of Kansas (American Meteorological Society)   
1995
S. Traci Arthur   The Pennsylvania State University (GTE's Federal Systems Division)   
Corinne M. Carter   Cornell University (American Meteorological Society)   
Jonathan L. Case   University of Oklahoma (PRC Inc.)   
Stephen G. Gaddy   University of Oklahoma (Loral Defense Systems East)   
Gregory E. Gahrs   The Florida State University (Martin Marietta Astro Space)   
Gregory J. Gemmen   Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Cray Research, Inc.)   
Christopher T. Hudgin   University of Oklahoma (Hughes Information Technology Corporation)   
Dana E. Lane   Scripps Institution of Oceanography (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
Timothy J. Lang   Colorado State University (Space Systems/Loral)   
Edward A. Mlodzik   University of Illinois at Champaign (ITT Aerospace/Communications Division)   
Phillipe Rolland   University of Utah (DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program)   
James R. Winterle   University of Arizona (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
1996
Brian M. Astifan   The Pennsylvania State University (Hughes Information Technology Corporation)   
George H. Bryan   The Pennsylvania State University (National Weather Service)   
Matthew T. Carr   McGill University (American Meteorological Society)   
David A. Faysash   The Florida State University (Space Systems/Loral)   
Cristina A. Kaufman   University of Oklahoma (Cray Research, Inc.)   
Greg C. Liknes   University of North Dakota (DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program)   
Joseph A. MacDonald   University of Michigan (NOAA s Office of Global Programs)   
Paul M. Markowski   The Pennsylvania State University (GTE Government Systems Corporation, Federal Systems Division)   
Tracy A. Monegan   Wittenberg University (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
Matthew D. Parker   Valparaiso University (ITT Aerospace/Communications Division)   
Mark J. Potosnak   Harvard University (Lockheed Martin Astro Space)   
Jeffrey M. Warner   The Pennsylvania State University (PRC Inc.)   
1997
Michael C. Coniglio   University of Oklahoma (National Weather Service)   
Keith K. Contre   North Carolina State University (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
Andrew R. Dean   University of Oklahoma (SGI/Cray Research, Inc.)   
Michael A. Kistler   Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Lockheed Martin Astro Space)   
Ian P. Kraucunas   University of Washington (GTE Government Systems)   
William G. Lawson   Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Hughes Information Technology Systems)   
Richard J. Lynn   University of Oklahoma (NASA Mission to Planet Earth)   
Patrice A. Melancon   University of Texas (NASA Mission to Planet Earth)   
Michael A. Mischna   The Pennsylvania State University (Space Systems/Loral)   
Brett W. Newkirk   The University of Arizona (DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program)   
Payal P. Parekh   Massachusetts Institute of Technology (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
Christopher C. Weiss   University of Oklahoma (NASA Mission to Planet Earth)   
Stephen G. Strum   University of Oklahoma (ITT Aerospace/Communications Division)   
1998
Amanda S. Adams   University of Wisconsin—Madison (DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program)   
Eric S. Blake   Colorado State University (NASA Mission to Planet Earth)   
Robert W. Carver   University of Oklahoma (National Weather Service)   
Scott J. Eichelberger   University of Washington (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
Joanne M. Feldman   The Pennsylvania State University (GTE Government Systems)   
Chris A. Fiebrich   University of Oklahoma (National Science Foundation Division of Atmospheric Sciences)   
Michael R. Hiscock   Duke University (NASA Mission to Planet Earth)   
Jeanne M. Jagodzinski   The Pennsylvania State University (NASA Mission to Planet Earth)   
Erica M. Loechl   Colorado State University (ITT Aerosace/Communications Division)   
Nathan D. Marsili   University of Wisconsin—Madison (NASA Mission to Planet Earth)   
Jeremy L. Moore   North Carolina State University (American Meteorological Society)   
Elizabeth A. Northcott   Ohio State University (National Science Foundation Division of Atmospheric Sciences)   
Jeffrey S. Olsen   University of California, Davis (Systems Space/Loral)   
David A. Tucker   University of Washington (DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program)   
Shawn M. Weagle   The Pennsylvania State University (Silicon Graphics/Cray Research)   
Marc J. Weinberg   University of Oklahoma (Raytheon Information Systems Company)   
Michael M. Whitney   Delaware University (NOAA's Office of Global Programs)   
Shane E. Wood   University of Washington (National Science Foundation Division of Atmospheric Sciences)   
AMS/Industry Undergraduate Scholarships
1999
Lee T. Ringer   North Carolina State University (Information and Technology Scientific Services)   
Mindy L. Bumgarner   Eastern New Mexico University (Science and Technology Corporation)   
Garett J. Argianas   University of Albany (Vaisala Inc.)   
Elizabeth A. Robbins   Oakland University (Handar Inc.)   
Joseph E. Lapka   University of Michigan (All Weather Incorporated)   
Benjamin D. Teolis   Stevens Institute of Technology (Enterprise Electronics Corporation)   
Tracy L. McCormick   Lyndon State College (Weather Services International)   
Scott W. Parker   North Carolina State University (Office of the Coordinator for Meteorology)   
Timothy O. Markle   Plymouth State College (Accuweather Inc.)   
Bradley C. Navarro   The University of Oklahoma (Weathernews Inc.)   
Steven L. Aves   Iowa State University (SAIC Center for Atmospheric Physics)   
Stephanie A. Stroman   Valparaiso University (The IT Group Inc.)   
1991
Stephanie M. Blozy   Saint Louis University (Qualimetrics, Inc.)   
1992
Kathleen Eyerman   University of Oklahoma (Qualimetrics, Inc.)   
Sharon Hauer   Purdue University (Hughes STX Corporation)   
Joseph Rohrbach   The Pennsylvania State University (AER Inc.)   
Brian Skinner   University of Oklahoma (Aeromet Inc.)   
Tina Johnson   West Virginia University (Science and Technology Corporation)   
John Mewes   University of North Dakota (Campbell Scientific, Inc.)   
Jerald Brotzge   Saint Louis University (Atmospherics, Inc.)   
1993
Jason J. Levit   University of Oklahoma (Aeromet Inc.)   
Stephen G. Gaddy   The Pennsylvania State University (Hughes STX Corporation)   
Christopher T. Hudgin   North Carolina State University (Science and Technology Corporation)   
Jonathan L. Case   State University of New York, Brockport (Alden Electronics, Inc.)   
Kathryn Klawiter   North Carolina State University (Radian Corporation)   
Kevin A. Cooper   Northland College (Handar Inc.)   
Jessica L. Neu   Texas A&M University (The MITRE Corporation)   
Cristina A. Kaufman   Bethel College (National Council of Meteorologists)   
John J. Rozbicki   State University of New York at Albany (Vaisala, Inc.)   
Teresa A. Grabler   State University of New York, Oswego (Concurrent Computer Corporation)   
Jeremy A. Marzani   The Pennsylvania State University (AAI Systems Management Incorporated)   
1994
David A. Ahijevych   Valparaiso University (Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.)   
Mark J. Gibbas   Plymouth State College (Concurrent Computer Corporation)   
Julie R. Givan   The Florida State University (Enterprise Electronics Corporation)   
Sonya C. Kulkarni   The Pennsylvania State University (Science and Technology Corporation)   
Daniel F. Lara   College of Santa Fe (Campbell Scientific, Inc.)   
Greg C. Liknes   University of North Dakota (The MITRE Corporation)   
Brian P. Mackey   The Florida State University (WSI Corporation)   
Douglas E. Murphy   Purdue University (Surface Systems, Inc.)   
Noah M. Nigg   Purdue University (R. M. Young Company)   
Ryan J. Sharp   The Florida State University (AAI Systems Management Inc.)   
Ryan J. Zerr   University of North Dakota (Hughes STX Corporation)   
1995
Michael T. Batdorf   Boise State University (Handar, Inc.)   
Joseph Parks Camp   The Florida State University (Science and Technology Corporation)   
Adam S. Cohen   Cornell University (Vaisala, Inc.)   
Michael A. Kistler   The Pennsylvania State University (AAI Systems Management Inc.)   
W. Gregory Lawson   Yale University (Belfort Instrument Co.)   
Timothy S. Martin   Purdue University (Particle Measuring Systems, Inc.)   
John V. Matthews   University of Massachusetts at Lowell (EARTH TECH)   
Michael A. Mischna   Cornell University (Alden Electronics, Inc.)   
CarrieAnn Ortolani   Cornell University (The MITRE Corporation)   
Jon D. Radakovich   The Pennsylvania State University (Hughes STX Corporation)   
Stephen G. Strum   The Pennsylvania State University (Radian Corporation)   
Jay-Calvin Uyemura-Reyes   University of Hawaii, Manoa (Nat'l Council of Industrial Meteorologists)   
Joel C. Widenor   The Pennsylvania State University (Concurrent Computer Corporation)   
Shane E. Wood   University of North Dakota (Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology)   
1996
Amy E. Blackmore   University of Missouri Columbia (Surface Systems, Inc.)   
Robert W. Carver   New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (Particle Measuring Systems, Inc.)   
Donna M. Couture   Maine Maritime Academy (Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology)   
Michael A. Dente   Nassau Community College (Hughes STX Corporation)   
Dora Farkas   Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.)   
Shawn R. Ferreria   Merced College (Campbell Scientific, Inc.)   
Cynthia R. Knapp   University of Wisconsin—Madison (Kavouras Inc.)   
Ian P. McAbeer   California Maritime Academy (R. M. Young Company)   
Jeremy L. Moore   North Carolina State University (Science and Technology Corporation)   
Robert E. Moyer IV   The Pennsylvania State University (AAI Systems Management Incorporated)   
Avanti J. Rao   Wellesley College (Concurrent Computer Corporation)   
Ryan L. Solomon   University of Oklahoma (Enterprise Electronics Corporation)   
1997
Mohan B. Dangi   Colorado School of Mines (Particle Measuring Systems, Inc.)   
Jill C. Derby   North Carolina State University (AAI Systems Management Incorporated)   
Brian C. Dicola   Rutgers—The State University of New Jersey (Concurrent Computer Corporation)   
Cory A. Fulton   University of California at Davis (Handar, Inc.)   
Ryan P. Girard   University of Massachusetts at Lowell (Vaisala, Inc.)   
John M. Haynes   The Pennsylvania State University (Accuweather, Inc.)   
Matthew J. Hostutler   The Pennsylvania State University (SAIC, Center for Atmospheric Physics)   
Tim L. Kramer   Bismarck State College (Science and Technology Corporation)   
Daniel T. Lindsey   University of Georgia (Enterprise Electronics Corporation)   
Janet E. Martinez   University of Oklahoma (Radian Electronics Division)   
Matthew E. Newman   Rutgers—The State University of New Jersey (Nat'l Council of Industrial Meteorologists)   
Nicondra T. Norwood   Mississippi State University (Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology)   
Brian P. Reen   Cederville College (EARTH TECH)   
Scott M. Steiger   State University of New York at Oswego (Weather Services International)   
Blaine C. Thomas   St. Cloud State University (Belfort Instrument Co.)   
Mandy K. Upton   University of North Texas (Weathernews Inc.)   
Carrie M. Wood   University of North Dakota (The MITRE Corporation)   
David P. Yorty   University of Utah (Hughes STX Corporation)   
1998
Jennifer B. Allan   Oswego State University (Weather Services Corporation)   
Anthony Arguez   The Florida State University (Enterprise Electronics Corporation)   
Minesh K. Bacarania   The Florida State University (SAIC, Center for Atmospheric Physics)   
Peggy R. Concannon   Northern Illinois University (R. M. Young Company)   
Brett L. Cummins   Jones Junior College (Baron Services)   
Kyle A. Hilburn   University of North Dakota (Kavouras Inc.)   
Connie J. Hissung   University of North Dakota (Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology)   
Benjamen B. Korzeniewski   University of North Carolina at Asheville (Science and Technology Corporation)   
Rebecca E. Kyle   Antioch College (Radian Electronic Systems)   
Hanne V. Murphey   L. A. Pierce College (Raytheon STX Corporation)   
Pamela L. Pedersen   Cornell University (Atmospheric and Environmental Research   
Shelley L. Potts   University of Miami (Solar Light Company)   
Scott D. Preston   University of Missouri—Columbia (Systems Management Incorporated)   
Tiffany R. Rippeon   L. A. Pierce College (Alden Electronics Inc.)   
Cory A. Wolff   University of North Dakota (Campbell Scientific, Inc.)