Blown Covers




Blown Covers

  New Yorker covers you were never meant to see
“The Gays” Contest: The Winner!
By Jack Hunter
Nadja had to gently break to me the news of all the rumors surrounding these two beloved muppets. But this scene is so sweet (I love their 1950’s television set) — it had to be the winner. 

“The Gays” Contest: The Winner!

By Jack Hunter

Nadja had to gently break to me the news of all the rumors surrounding these two beloved muppets. But this scene is so sweet (I love their 1950’s television set) — it had to be the winner. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #1 
By Ella German
The overwhelming outpouring of love after Maurice Sendak’s death makes any remembrance of him poignant. Maurice Sendak wasn’t closeted but neither was he a Gay activist. We had to talk about whether it would be fair to use his characters to represent Gay marriage. But he was, after all, always an advocate for being true to yourself. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #1 

By Ella German

The overwhelming outpouring of love after Maurice Sendak’s death makes any remembrance of him poignant. Maurice Sendak wasn’t closeted but neither was he a Gay activist. We had to talk about whether it would be fair to use his characters to represent Gay marriage. But he was, after all, always an advocate for being true to yourself. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #2
By Gayle Kabaker
A beautiful, sensual image. A woman’s face is the quintessential magazine cover, so these two women work well here. I like that they’re about to kiss, so it makes you anticipate the next moment. The women feel both abstract and specific. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #2

By Gayle Kabaker

A beautiful, sensual image. A woman’s face is the quintessential magazine cover, so these two women work well here. I like that they’re about to kiss, so it makes you anticipate the next moment. The women feel both abstract and specific. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #3
By Jean Tuttle
There are a few things about this image that work well: one is that there are both two women and two men which gives a broad definition of Gay. The Iwo Jima reference with the flag evokes a strategic military victory - that seems correct with where we’re at now. And still it manages to be poster-like. Like the cake, this has lots of layers. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #3

By Jean Tuttle

There are a few things about this image that work well: one is that there are both two women and two men which gives a broad definition of Gay. The Iwo Jima reference with the flag evokes a strategic military victory - that seems correct with where we’re at now. And still it manages to be poster-like. Like the cake, this has lots of layers. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #4
By Julien Couty
This made us laugh, and then we sat around dissecting the pc-ness of the joke. Now that gay marriage has become wider spread, we’d hope that fewer gay men would find themselves in heterosexual marriages. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #4

By Julien Couty

This made us laugh, and then we sat around dissecting the pc-ness of the joke. Now that gay marriage has become wider spread, we’d hope that fewer gay men would find themselves in heterosexual marriages. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-up #5
By Nata Metlukh
An interesting observation about how it can feel to be a heterosexual couple these days. I like the fact that they’re portrayed in the center of the image but colorless, without as much substance as the couples around them. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-up #5

By Nata Metlukh

An interesting observation about how it can feel to be a heterosexual couple these days. I like the fact that they’re portrayed in the center of the image but colorless, without as much substance as the couples around them. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #6
By Tim Foley
A sign of the times. I like the use of the old-fashioned bell hop and stickers on the suitcases. I’m sure many hotels in those states are busy preparing their honeymoon suites. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #6

By Tim Foley

A sign of the times. I like the use of the old-fashioned bell hop and stickers on the suitcases. I’m sure many hotels in those states are busy preparing their honeymoon suites. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner Up #7
By Chee Yang Ong
The donkey is forcing the Republican elephant out into the open on this debate, and they’re understandably reluctant. This is a good thought.  

“The Gays” Contest: Runner Up #7

By Chee Yang Ong

The donkey is forcing the Republican elephant out into the open on this debate, and they’re understandably reluctant. This is a good thought.  

“The Gays” Contest: Runner Up #8
By Jérémie Decalf
This is a good representation of the current politics of Gay marriage - it was once a tool that conservatives used against liberals and now the tables have turned. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner Up #8

By Jérémie Decalf

This is a good representation of the current politics of Gay marriage - it was once a tool that conservatives used against liberals and now the tables have turned. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner Up #9
By Alfonso Ferreira
This isn’t a passionate embrace, it’s a politician’s kiss. Sill it cuts through a lot of the posturing of political discourse to a simple and somehow genuine gesture. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner Up #9

By Alfonso Ferreira

This isn’t a passionate embrace, it’s a politician’s kiss. Sill it cuts through a lot of the posturing of political discourse to a simple and somehow genuine gesture. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #10
By Maria Eugenia
We received many images with rings and hands - this one was simple and elegant. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #10

By Maria Eugenia

We received many images with rings and hands - this one was simple and elegant. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #11
By MJ Sketchbook
Support for gay marriage or opposition to it is a political issue right now and this image expresses that thought clearly by painting one symbol over the other. And since they’re both striped flags, there’s something there. 

“The Gays” Contest: Runner-Up #11

By MJ Sketchbook

Support for gay marriage or opposition to it is a political issue right now and this image expresses that thought clearly by painting one symbol over the other. And since they’re both striped flags, there’s something there. 



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