Darling Downs Obituaries, 1887.

From the pages of the Toowoomba Chronicle.

Compiled by Terry Foenander.




These obituaries, transcribed from the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, are arranged in chronological order, by date of the obituary, and not by the date of death. The death date can be surmised from the actual obituary. An alphabetical index has been compiled of the names of the deceased persons, and precedes the actual obituaries. Each name in the index is accompanied by the date of the obituary, to allow for easy access to the report.


Index

Ah Goon, March 3, 1887.

Elizabeth Anderson, June 28, 1887.

John Bartlett, January 15, 1887.

G.H. Beer, June 28, 1887.

David Beh, January 8, 1887.

J. Boland, January 1, 1887.

(Mrs.) W. Bowden, October 20, 1887.

Nellie Brougham, December 6, 1887.

John Brown, April 26, 1887.

Michael Canny, April 9, 1887.

H.D. Caswell, June 2, 1887.

Thomas Cochran, December 10, 1887.

A.H. Connell, March 31, 1887.

George Cook, August 20, 1887.

Kate Coyle, June 2, 1887.

James Dalton, April 26, 1887.

Helena Elizabeth Darroch, March 22, 1887.

William Davidson, March 15, 1887.

(Mrs.) ---- Davis, October 15, 1887.

Josiah Dent, January 20, 1887.

Joseph Derrick, December 29, 1887.

W.S. Drewe, December 31, 1887.

C. Fichtner, March 22, 1887.

Michael Flynn, June 28, 1887.

(Sir) St. George Ralph Gore, October 20, 1887.

Mary Gratton, November 17, 1887 and November 19, 1887.

Annie Hamilton, November 10, 1887.

Margaret Hansford, November 15, 1887.

James Harwood, May 31, 1887.

Edwin Hawkins, April 19, 1887 and April 28, 1887.

John Haynes, March 15, 1887.

Alfred Hubbard, February 5, 1887.

James Ivory, March 15, 1887.

Robert Jessop, July 28, 1887.

F. Johnston, February 12, 1887.

Francis Kelly, April 19, 1887.

H.J. Lavers, April 11, 1887.

Raymond James Leigh, May 31, 1887.

E. Lord, snr., November 10, 1887.

Charles A. Lovejoy, June 11, 1887.

James Manning, November 5, 1887.

Arthur Martin, snr., October 18, 1887.

William Martin, May 31, 1887.

Edward McHugh, September 1, 1887.

James McKeachie, July 5, 1887.

W.P. Mellefont, February 8, 1887.

Charles Moore, May 5, 1887.

William Morganwick, July 5, 1887.

William Murphy, October 22, 1887.

William Lambie Nelson, June 14, 1887.

Kate Noonan, January 27, 1887.

P. Noonan, January 27, 1887.

---- O'Hagan, July 9, 1887.

Robert Page, March 19, 1887.

John Petrie, jun., March 22, 1887.

Thomas Pillar, March 8, 1887.

Charles Pottinger, junr., July 21, 1887.

William Roberts, April 11, 1887.

C.F.A. Scheirmeister, October 11, 1887.

James Siv[e]ret, November 29, 1887.

---- Smith, July 16, 1887.

Timothy Spillane, June 9, 1887.

William Stower, January 15, 1887 and January 18, 1887.

William Taylor, January 3, 1887.

---- Todd, April 28, 1887.

Aubrey Turner, July 30, 1887.

A. Ullathorne, November 5, 1887.

H.J. Wallace (Mr. and Mrs.), February 19, 1887.

Elizabeth Walsh, March 31, 1887.

John Ward, August 11, 1887.

Wy Young, October 29, 1887.


Obituaries:

From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, January 1, 1887:

It is with much regret that we (Courier) have to record the death of Mr. J. Boland, until recently a highly valued member of the reporting staff of the Courier and Observer. Mr. Boland first entered the service of the Brisbane Newspaper Company in its commercial department, but his strong bent for journalism, which he first manifested as a contributor to the Queenslander, soon led to his transfer to the literary staff of the Courier. After some training at the ordinary routine work of a reporter, he was specially attached to the staff of the Observer, on the suggestion of the late Mr. O'Carroll, who had a quick eye for individual merit, and detected Mr. Boland's peculiar aptitude for newspaper work. The quick intuition with which he seized on apparently insignificant facts, and following up the clue they afforded, traced them to a conclusion quite unexpected by more slow moving minds, was fully appreciated among those who knew him and could estimate his work. Thus no one was surprised when he applied for permission to go to Ipswich and interview a man who had just been buried - officially - in Brisbane, and the result proved the correctness of his suspicions. It was chiefly owing to his ready wit and energy that we were able to extract all that was worth knowing about that remarkable expedition of the Geographical Society to New Guinea, in spite of the supremely silly instructions sent from Sydney to close the mouths of its leaders. He was also the only European, we believe, permitted by the Chinese to witness the private ceremonies with which they inaugurated their temple at Breakfast Creek. These little journalistic successes would not be worth recording were it not that they indicate the capacity of our lamented friend, who had no journalistic experience but that which he obtained in Brisbane, and they are the grounds of our belief that if he had lived he would have made his mark on a much more important journalistic field than Queensland affords. For, besides ready wit, quick intelligence, and untiring energy, he had the gift of graphic description and literary tastes. But the symptoms of the fatal pulmonary disease which killed him were early manifest, and, at the beginning of the present year, he endeavored to escape his doom by going out into the dry climate of the West. Whether that would have saved him, as it has saved so many, if he had remained there long enough, it is impossible to say. At all events, he returned to the coast after a brief residence inland, and it was only too evident that he would never resume his place among his fellow workers. He lingered for some months, though without hope of recovery, and passed away on Wednesday morning. Thus a career full of bright promises was prematurely closed, and pressmen here have lost a comrade who had won their cordial liking and esteem. It may be added that deceased was a cousin of Mr. Boland, of the firm of Boland & McHugh, of this town. - Ed. T.C.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Monday, January 3, 1887:

The victim of a very melancholy tragedy died (The Melbourne Telegraph reports) in the Melbourne Hospital on Monday evening. He was William Taylor, aged thirty-six, who had followed the occupation of a labourer, and who, with his wife and family, lived at Campbell Street, Collingwood. It was about a quarter past 5 o'clock that Edward Lees, an employee of Mr. Walter Fergerson, undertaker, of Vere Street called at the Collingwood watchhouse, and informed Constable Shields, who was on duty there, that Taylor had swallowed a large quantity of carbolic acid, and that he was lying in terrible agony at his house, Campbell Street. The police went to the place, and removed Taylor to the Melbourne Hospital in a cab, but soon received a message announcing his death in the institution. Taylor had a boy seven years of age, and a girl twelve months; but the latter was only buried on the previous day; and it was whilst his wife was out at the cemetery yesterday afternoon that he poisoned himself by drinking the carbolic acid, about 4 oz. of which there was in a bottle in the house. His wife left home at half past 3, taking the boy with her, and when she returned at 4 o'clock she found her husband was struggling in agony on the floor. Lees was then called in. On a table in the front room there was a note written by Taylor. In it he stated he could not bear the troubles and trials of this world any longer, that his heart was broken, that he could live no longer in this way, and that he hoped his dear wife would be happier than she had been for the past four years. He was known as a good husband and father, and was of sober habits, but had lately been ill with typhoid fever, and was subject to fits.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, January 8, 1887:

In our obituary column today appears an announcement of the death of Mr. David Beh of the Middle Ridge. This announcement will be read with deep regret by a large circle of the deceased gentleman's friends. Mr. Beh was one of the most prominent as well as one of the most successful vignerons of this district, and in his own way did much to prove the adaptability of the soil of the Middle Ridge for the cultivation of the grape for the manufacture of wine. His vineyard for years past has been the resort of hundreds of the inhabitants of this town and district, and the excellence of his grapes had earned a deservedly wide reputation. The news of his death caused general surprise as very few persons were cognizant of his illness. He caught a slight cold some ten days ago, and it was not until about 48 hours before his death that his family were uneasy concerning the result. Acute congestion of the lungs, however, set in and terminated fatally on Tuesday last. Mr. Beh was a most valued colonist and his death at the early age of 47 will be extremely regretted.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, January 15, 1887:

The following report of a dreadful case of suicide appeared in the Tenterfield Star on Wednesday last: - "One of those sensational events which occur from time to time took place on Saturday afternoon last, when a rumor gained currency in town that an elderly man, well known in the district, named John Bartlett, had committed suicide by hanging himself in a paddock adjacent to Aldershot Farm. Sergeant Hicks was informed of the occurrence, and on proceeding to the spot found the unfortunate man's body lying on the ground, covered with ants, and presenting altogether a sickening spectacle. The cause which impelled deceased in committing the rash act does not appear very plain, but it seems that, after a drinking bout, he invariably relapsed into a state of extreme despondency under the depressing influences of which he had frequently threatened to take his own life and had actually on a former occasion, endeavored to do so. This time he accomplished his fatal design by climbing up the limb of an apple tree, tying a rope round his neck and round the tree, and jumping down, the fall of course causing strangulation. So intent does he appear to have been to effect his sinister purpose that he seems to have refused to take advantage of means of escape, and to have held his feet off the ground in order that death might not be averted. An examination of the spot, and of the body of deceased on Sunday morning convinced us that he must have undergone great agony as many severe abrasions, caused by struggling, were visible on the face of the corpse, while the ground under the tree where the body was found was kicked and rooted and covered with blood. After the Coroner and jury had viewed the body, and examined the spot where the tragedy was enacted, deceased's remains were interred, the inquest being adjourned till the following morning."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, January 15, 1887:

We learn from Mr. Inspector Harris, that a shocking fatality occurred near the New Inn on the Cambooya Road, about four miles from Drayton, on Thursday evening. The hotel is kept by Mr. Jacob Stower, and one of his sons [William Stower], a fine young fellow aged 17, descended a well near the hotel on Thursday to effect some necessary repairs. The well was 80 feet deep, and when not in use was covered with a piece of sheet iron, which was weighted with a heavy stone. Prior to the youth descending the well, the sheet iron and stone were lifted bodily from the mouth and deposited just alongside. By some means, which have not yet been reported to the police, the sheet iron was tilted on one side while Stower was in the well; the stone slid off and into the well, falling on the deceased, and causing his death. Whether death was instantaneous we did not learn, but the young man is dead, and a good deal of sympathy is expressed for his family, as he was a most promising young colonist.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, January 18, 1887:

Regarding the report of the fatal accident which occurred at Cambooya on Thursday last, by which Mr. William Stower lost his life, additional details have been received, which we are requested to publish. The deceased and another man had been at work at the well for three days. Over the well was a shed, and some planks had been placed over the mouth of the well on which the tin for the covering rested. The tin had been carefully removed on one side and no stone was on it, but the deceased desired more light in the well, and when one of the small slabs had been removed a stone accidentally rolled away from the side, and before it could be reached it fell down the well. The man on the top shouted to Stower to mind the stone, but it appeared to strike the bucket first and then rebounded against the left temple of young Stower causing a fraction of the skull. The unfortunate young man was immediately removed from the well in an unconscious state to his father's residence, and Dr. Garde was sent for. But medical aid was of no avail, death taking place at half past twelve on Friday morning, seven hours after the accident. The deceased was a very promising young man and was highly respected in the neighborhood.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, January 20, 1887:

In our obituary columns this morning is announced the death of one of the first settlers in the Toowoomba district - indeed we believe we are justified in stating that he was the oldest resident of this town. The late Mr. Josiah Dent was an old identity, and he carries us back to the period when the present site of Toowoomba formed a part of a Gowrie sheep station, and when only about 30 or 40 splitters and fencers were located on the Main Range. Mr. Dent was a useful man in his way. He leaves a grown up family of sons and daughters to mourn their loss. He died on Tuesday of bronchitis after an illness of ten days and at the ripe age of 71 years.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, January 27, 1887:

The Queensland Times of Tuesday says: - Sad to say, there has been loss of life, and it is feared that the worst is not yet known. It was reported, yesterday morning, that Mrs. P. Noonan, her daughter Kate, and an infant grandchild, had been drowned near Normanby. Senior Sergeant O'Driscoll received a telegram from Senior Constable Boudet, of Harrisville, confirming this. It ran: "Mrs. Noonan, her daughter, and grandchild, carried away by flood last night; rest of family rescued by trees; bodies recovered." We were told that the drowning occurred when the family were leaving the house and creeping along the fence towards higher ground, our informant saying that the rail of the fence on which the deceased then were gave way, and the flood washed them off. Another story is that, on the waters rising to the house, Mr. Noonan, his wife, three children, and a grandchild sought higher ground, Mr. Noonan carrying the youngest (two) of the children. Wading through the deep water, he was knocked down by a floating log, and the two little ones were drowned. The others struggled on, with some difficulty for a time, but Mrs. Noonan never reached land, though she was seen for a while clinging to a tree. The bodies were found close by on Saturday. Mrs. Noonan was a daughter of the late Mr. D. O'Brien, of the Three Mile Creek, a sister of Mr. Dennis O'Brien of Dalby, and of Mr. Daniel O'Brien, of Mount Walker, and, before becoming Mrs. Noonan, she was the widow of the late John Collins. It was reported that fears were entertained for the safety of Mr. Solway and family (of Normanby), of Mr. J. Doolan's wife and child, at the "Top Camp" Normanby; and of several persons near Engelsburg - in fact, such was the state of the country that we can not wonder if several other deaths through the flood have not occurred. Fears are entertained for the safety of Mr. Josias Hancock's sawmill at Dugandan, as well as of other premises there. Rosewood, too, was partly flooded; and it was possible to swim in the main street at Marburg. The loss of property was great, for there is scarcely a watercourse of any size, near which there was fencing where at least some of the material had not been washed away, and many a landowner will thus be put to a few pounds expense.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, February 5, 1887:

News was received in Brisbane on Thursday morning of the death of Mr. Alfred Hubbard at Southport. Mr. Hubbard was (says the Courier) for twenty years a well known and respected citizen of Brisbane, and was an alderman for several years, and mayor two years in succession. The deceased gentleman had been ailing for two years past. His death is much regretted by his large circle of friends.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, February 8, 1887:

The death is announced of Mr. W.P. Mellefont J.P. proprietor of the Gladstone Observer in the 45th year of his age. Mr. Mellefont has been long and favorably known to the pressmen of Queensland. Formerly he owned in conjunction with Mr. Marcus, the Ipswich Advocate and for the last five years he has owned and published the Gladstone Observer. He was a thoroughly practical and an all round good pressman, and won the esteem and respect of all with whom he came in contact. Although a liberal in politics he was not unmindful of the good that public men who differed from him in political views have conferred upon the country and he has never been slow to acknowledge it. Gladstone has lost a good citizen and the press of the colony one of its best and most useful members.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, February 12, 1887:

Mr. F. Johnston, a young man of great promise and who was for some time one of the most valued and steady assistants at the butchering establishment of Messrs. Campbell Bros. and Co. died last evening of typhoid fever. He took ill about a month ago, and Dr. Flood who attended him, considered the attack a mild one and was hopeful of recovery, but, unfortunately on Saturday last the disease assumed a malignant form and ended fatally last night. The funeral is to take place at two o'clock today.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, February 19, 1887:

It is our painful duty (says the Mackay Standard), to record one of the most distressing accidents that has ever occurred in this district. On the 3rd instant, Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Wallace were both drowned in Marian Creek, about halfway between this and St. Lawrence. Very few details have as yet come to hand, but unfortunately there can be no doubt of the painful reality. It appears that Mr. and Mrs. Wallace left Mackay on the 2nd for St. Lawrence, in a pair horse buggy, Mr. A. McInnes being also with them. Crossing Sandy Creek they had rather an escape, as the water was very high, and right into the buggy; they, however, got all right to Plane Creek, where they spend the night at Mr. H. Bells. They went on next morning, and had got as far as Marian Creek, which is about eight miles this side of West Hill Station, and found the creek swollen with rain, but being a good, level crossing, Mr. Wallace probably thought he could get over all right. The buggy, however, seems to have upset, and all the occupants were thrown into the water. Mr. A. McInnes got ashore some distance down in a very exhausted state, but his companions had perished. He set out to walk to West Hill Station. Mr. De Costa, the manager, at once sent out men and blackboys to try and recover the bodies, and also despatched a man to St. Lawrence, the nearest telegraph office, to send the news to Mackay. Mr. and Mrs. Wallace were among the oldest residents here, and were well liked by a numerous circle of friends; they leave five young children to mourn their sudden and untimely loss.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, March 3, 1887:

A Melbourne telegram in the Sydney Globe of Saturday last says:- Ah Goon was bitten by a tiger snake. The Chinese cut the snake's head into small pieces, made a poultice, and applied it to the ankle of the bitten man, who was left in his hut all night. On his removal, he died 20 minutes after his admittance into the Wangaratta Hospital.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, March 8, 1887:

Further particulars (says yesterday's Courier) are to hand in regard to the fatal accident which occurred at the Morven railway station on Wednesday last. It appears that about 6.30 a.m. that morning a man was discovered lying under some loaded trucks between the rails. He was lying in such a natural position that at first sight the man who discovered him said, "Good morning, mate," thinking he was sleeping, but on examination he was found to be dead. His head was almost completely cut off, only a small portion of skin and flesh on one side holding it on. The little finger of his right hand was cut off, and his right arm smashed up by the shoulder. At the magisterial inquiry held on Thursday before Mr. H. Carter, J.P., it was elicited from the staionmaster's evidence that the loaded train had been shunted to where it was about half-past 1 that morning; so that the unfortunate fellow must have met his death then. He was identified as Thomas Pillar, whose brother Mr. Joseph Pillar, is, it is stated, editor of the Tenterfield Times. He has been in the neighbourhood about three weeks, and was driving a horse and dray for a man named Patrick McGinty. The latter was in his company all day on the 1st, and only left him about 6 in the evening, when he was perfectly sober.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday March 15, 1887:

A man named William Davidson, a boundary rider, died rather suddenly at 4 o'clock on Sunday morning at Eton Vale. On Saturday Morning he complained to his wife of violent pains in the abdomen, and in the afternoon she came into Toowoomba and stated the symptoms of her husband's illness to Dr. Armstrong, who considered it very much like a case of English cholera. The wife returned to Eton Vale, and reached there between twelve and one o'clock on Sunday morning. The medicine she brought with her was given to her husband according to instructions, but he expired at four o'clock the same morning. An inquiry was held before E.D. Hodgson, Esq., J.P., who gave an order for the interment of the body.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday March 15, 1887:

A very sad accident occurred on Friday afternoon last which terminated fatally. Mr. John Haynes, a selector on the Felton run and a very enterprising colonist, came into Toowoomba on Friday morning and purchased a new spring cart from the coach works of Mr. Thomas Trevethan. he purchased some groceries at one of the local stores and was returning to his home by the main road to Pittsworth (Beauaraba). Following behind him was his son driving a dray and two horses. At about half past 4 o'clock the son found the spring cart overturned on the road, and his father lying underneath it, with the iron work of the right side across his neck. The son called to his assistance some navvies who were camped near at hand, and the cart was lifted from the body when it was found that life was quite extinct, the neck apparently being broken so that death must have been almost instantaneous. The deceased was driving a rather spirited horse, and, becoming unmanageable when driven for the first time in the spring cart, it is conjectured he ran against the stump of a fallen tree in the road and capsized the vehicle. The body was placed on the son's dray and conveyed to Pittsworth where a magesterial inquiry was held.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday March 15, 1887:

Mr. James Ivory is a familiar name to many residents on the Darling Downs. At one time he was a large property owner in Toowoomba, having invested his money here at the first land sales when lots of 30 to 60 acres were sold by the Crown at (pound sterling) 1 per acre and Ruthven Street 2 acre allotments at (pounds sterling) 4 per acre. The site on which the Toowoomba Hospital now stands was originally owned by Mr. Ivory. The Queensland Times of Saturday thus records the death of this highly respected gentleman:- It is our sad duty to chronicle the death of Mr. James Ivory, who departed from the living, at the old club house, in this town, yesterday morning. The deceased was one of the old pioneers, and, many years ago, owned what is now known as "Ripley," or Upper Bundanba, which he held as a station and worked as a squatter. Some years ago he removed to Bremer Cottage, on the bank of that river, where he resided with his family until a short time ago, when he came into town so that he should be nearer medical advice. Mr. Ivory came of a very high family, being the third son of the late Hon. Lord Ivory, who was Judge of Sessions, Edinburgh. The deceased gentleman had advanced to a ripe old age, being sixty-six years old at the time of his death, the immediate cause of which was paralysis. Mr. Ivory's remains were interred, yesterday afternoon in the Ipswich cemetery.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday March 19, 1887:

A sad drowning accident occurred at Balmain yesterday (says the S.M. Herald of the 12th instant). A young married man, named Robert Page, a labourer, took his little daughter, aged ten, into the water for a bathe at about 8 o'clock. His wife accompanied them to the wharf at the foot of Cooper Street, where they undressed, and descended the steps. Page then took the child on his back, and then swam about for a long time. Suddenly Mrs. Page on the wharf, observed him to be struggling in some difficulty, and screamed for help. A man, named Charles Watts who was within call, rushed to the spot and learning what was the matter, jumped in to Page's assistance. He succeeded in rescuing the child, but the father sank before his eyes. After placing the little girl in her mother's arms he again entered the water, and in half an hour's time recovered the lifeless body of the unfortunate father.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday March 22, 1887:

An inquest was held at Port Adelaide today (says a telegram in the S.M. Herald of the 15th instant) on the body of a married woman named Helena Elizabeth Darroch, who committed suicide by drowning on Sunday evening. On the day of her death the deceased wrote a long letter, stating that her husband was morally responsible for her act owing to his cruel treatment of her for several years past. The letter also contained a statement to the effect that he had told her that unless she committed suicide he would murder her. James Darroch, husband of the deceased, admitted in his evidence having treated his wife in a barbarous manner, but he denied the alleged threat to murder her. The jury returned a verdict of suicide whilst in an unsound state of mind, with a strong censure upon Darroch for his inhumanity towards the deceased. The coroner said that he was morally, though not legally, guilty of manslaughter.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday March 22, 1887:

It will be remembered says the Allora correspondent of the Warwick Argus, on Saturday last, by many of your readers that some months back Mr. C. Fichtner, farmer, of Spring Creek, made an attempt to take his life by cutting his throat, but by medical skill and care he was brought one might say, back to life. All went well until the wine making season came round. As soon as he had some wine made, and without giving it time to ferment, he commenced to drink to that extent that he became quite mad; and on last Tuesday morning I am informed he dressed in his best clothes, and, walking to his well, which I hear is 60 odd feet deep (with twenty feet of water), deliberately jumped in. In consequence of the kindness her husband had received from the Rev. A.C. Julius on the last sad occasion, the widow again sent for Mr. Julius, who at once set out, but full five hours elapsed before the body was recovered. I have been informed that Mr. Julius had to go down the well and see to the recovery of the body. This, if true - and I have no reason to doubt my informant - seems somewhat strange. Mr. Julius has only lately recovered from severe illness, and he surely ought not to have been allowed to undertake such a duty. The body of the unfortunate man was interred in the Allora Cemetery on Wednesday afternoon, the Rev. Mr. Julius officiating.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday March 22, 1887:

Mr. John Petrie, jun., died suddenly yesterday, at his father's residence, from heart disease, supervening on an attack of rheumatic fever. He was (says yesterday's Courier) born and educated in this city, and subsequently had the management of the Albion Brick and Tile Works. As an athlete he was well known, and with his contemporaries he was a great favorite. The funeral takes place this morning.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday March 31, 1887:

In our obituary columns today will be found the notice of the death of Mr. A.H. Connell, of Messrs. Connell Brothers of this town, at the early age of 23 years. Mr. Connell's death was not unexpected, as he like his brother who died here two years ago, was a victim to that dire disease - consumption. For some time the disease had worked ravages on the constitution of the deceased, and in the hope that a change of air would be beneficial he, in company with his parents and two sisters, went to Southport. The change was ineffectual, and Mr. Connell becoming worse returned to the Grand Hotel, Brisbane, where his malady proved fatal on Tuesday morning. Mr. A.H. Connell, like his brother who died two years ago, was of a quiet, unostentatious nature, but he was highly respected by all with whom he was acquainted. By yesterday's midday train the body was conveyed to Toowoomba, and at the station it was met by many of his former friends. The coffin, of polished cedar, and with elaborate brass mountings, and covered with beautiful wreaths of flowers, was conveyed to the hearse in waiting, outside the station, and from thence taken to the business establishment of the firm in Ruthven Street. The funeral will move from there today at two o'clock.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday March 31, 1887:

On Monday, the 21st instant, (says the Queensland Times of Tuesday) a girl was very severely burnt at Greenmount, near the Peak Mountain, and she died from the injuries so sustained on Saturday afternoon last. It appears that Mr. James Walsh and his family were removing, or had removed from an old house into a new one at Hillside. The kitchen fireplace in the latter house was not finished, and a fire was accordingly lighted outside in the open air. Elizabeth Walsh, aged eighteen, and daughter of Mr. Walsh, went to this fire to take a kettle of water off it. Having got this, she turned away from the fire, and the back of her skirt (a light cotton one) became ignited. She was not conscious of this, and walked in the direction of the house, though it is affirmed that she heard a sort of low roar or murmur behind her. She was soon made painfully aware of her danger, however, for the flames blazed up the back of her dress and burnt through her underclothing. The unfortunate girl at once ran to her mother, who vainly attempted to put out the fire with her hands, and only succeeded in getting burnt herself. The deceased's brother attracted by the cries, probably, then appeared upon the scene, and he promptly rushed into the house and got a blanket. Throwing it round his sister, he smothered the flames, but not before she was severely burnt. Her parents applied remedies of their own to the injured girl, but we understand, no medical attendance was obtained till about the end of the week, when she was brought to Ipswich by train. On arrival at the station, on Saturday morning, she was conveyed to the Hospital on a stretcher. The poor girl was attended to by Dr. Dunlop, who found that she was very severely injured about the arms, legs, and body, and that she was in a dying condition. Everything that could possibly be tried was done to endeavor to alleviate her sufferings, but without avail, and she died a few hours after admission. The deceased was a native of Ipswich, and gave promise of being a fine looking woman.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, April 9, 1887:

We (Warwick Examiner of Wednesday) regret to have to record the death of Mr. Michael Canny, father of Mr. J.A. Canny of this town, which event took place suddenly on Monday morning last. The old gentleman rose at his usual hour, about seven o'clock, and retired for his morning devotions. A short time afterwards he was found on the floor of his room quite dead, life having passed away silently and calmly. Mr. Canny had reached the ripe old age of 93, and had enjoyed the most robust health up to the period of his death. He was born in County Clare, Ireland, and belonged to a well known and highly respected family. He, with Mrs. Canny, (who died some years ago) and family came to Queensland in 1862. He settled in the Maryborough district, and entered upon sugar growing. A few years ago, on losing his dear wife, he came to reside with his son, the well known head teacher of the Warwick West School, with whose family he spent the closing years of his long life in comfort, receiving every care and attention. His funeral took place yesterday afternoon. His remains were followed to their last resting place by a large concourse of people. The solemn cortege was headed by the members of the Hibernian Society, who were in regalia, and marched in front of the hearse. Behind the hearse and the mourning coaches in which the family were, a large number of townspeople and residents of the district in buggies and horseback followed, the procession being a very large one, nearly a mile in length. The funeral service was conducted by the Rev. Father Horan in a very impressive manner.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Monday, April 11, 1887:

A singular discovery of human remains is thus reported by telegram from Wentworth in the S.M. Herald of Wednesday last: - A remarkable discovery of human remains has been made near Milkengay, about 50 miles from here, a portion of Avoca station. A rabbiter named Halbert, while on his round, discovered what proved to be the bones of some unfortunate bushman. Close by the remains a pair of bluchers and a wax vestas box were found, rusty and crushed by some passing animal, but with the name "Bell and Black" quite legible, and containing three cheques, amounting to over (pounds sterling) 15, wrapped in a piece of striped Scotch twill, and remarkably well preserved. The cheques were drawn in February, April, and September, 1886, the printing perfectly plain, while the writing is readable. They were all drawn in favour of William Roberts, one each on the Commercial Bank, Sydney, and the Bank of Victoria, Melbourne, by the Australian Pastoral and Investment Co., Limited, Robert Hughes, superintendent, G.W. Lambert, accountant. The third was drawn at Mooraro station, by Henry Brook, for Barritt and May, on G. Phillips and Co., Adelaide. The remains have since been buried.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Monday, April 11, 1887:

Our obituary column today notifies the death on Tuesday last, at Brisbane, of Mr. H.J. Lavers, a gentleman who a few years ago was a large storekeeper and a prominent public man in Drayton.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, April 19, 1887:

A very sad fatality (says Tuesday's Queensland Times) occurred at Walloon, yesterday afternoon, by which a boy, named Francis Kelly, lost his life. Some boys who were playing near the Bremer Creek, not far from the deceased boy's parents' residence, were returning home, when young Kelly, a little boy aged eight years, ventured into a waterhole that was full, owing to the late rains. The result was that the poor little fellow got out of his depth, and at once sank. One of his mates, Freddy Sturgess, about the same age dived in instantly and tried to save his drowning friend, but the deceased got hold of Sturgess and dragged him under also. Some friends attracted by their cries, got the two little chaps out, but poor Kelly was dead, and little Sturgess unconscious. The heroic conduct of little Sturgess is deserving of all praise, and is worthy of the Humane Society's medal.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, April 19, 1887:

On Saturday Inspector Harris received a very bald telegram from Senior constable Flynn, at Condamine, stating that a man named Edwin Hawkins, of Tieryboo, was found shot dead in bed that morning. A rifle was found beside deceased; surrounding circumstances suspicious. We made full enquiries from the police authorities, but up to late last night no further information had been received by them.

At a late hour last night our Brisbane correspondent telegraphed as follows:- "The following report has just been received from Roma; Mr. Edward Hawkins, Chairman of the Murwilla Divisional Board, was found dead in bed at Tieryboo station on Saturday morning. He was shot through the head, evidently while asleep. The ball entered the back of deceased's head and passed out and through the pillows on which he was sleeping. The only white people on the place the previous night were a servant man named Clayton and his wife. Clayton has been arrested on suspicion of having committed the murder. The deceased was a man in the prime of life, and had been nearly six years on Tieryboo station."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, April 26, 1887:

We have had several instances of more or less sudden deaths in this town lately (says the Port Elizabeth Telegraph), but few are more sad than that of the Rev. James Dalton, V.C., formerly of the 85th Regiment. Mr. Dalton had taken his discharge from the army, but in the Zulu was of 1879 volunteered for service against the Zulus. The engagement at Rorke's Drift is a matter of history, and the gallant defence made by the comparative handful of men against a horde of blood thirsty savages has been made the plot for thrilling dramas and the chief attraction at dioramas, exhibitions, and lectures. On that critical occasion Mr. Dalton made himself conspicuous by his bravery, and in acknowledgment he received the Victoria Cross - the highest and most coveted dignity in the army that is open to all ranks, and he was offered a lieutenant's commission, which he accepted, went to England, and soon after did service in Egypt with the rank of captain.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, April 26, 1887:

Our Stanthorpe correspondent writing on the 21st states that the sudden and unexpected death of Mr. John Brown, so long a resident in that locality, and so well and favorably known to the mining community throughout Queensland, caused quite a gloom during the past week, and his well known cheerful face and kindly word will be greatly missed for a long time to come. Some old friends from Gympie and Brisbane having come up on their Easter holidays to see him and were just preparing for their departure when he, exerting himself rather more than usual to get through his business to see them off by the train, and when just near his own door, complained of a pain at his heart, and on the advice of his wife seated himself in his arm chair and almost immediately fell off, as it were, quietly to sleep - but to sleep in death. Mr. John Brown was a native of Cheshire, England, and was for 40 years an Australian colonist. He came from New Zealand in 1862 to Sydney, and there entered into partnership with the well known journalist, Mr. R.B. Whitworth, and together they started a paper called the Cornstalk, which they ran for a considerable time, and then Mr. Brown sold out and came to Queensland in 1864. He then entered into business as cordial maker in Brisbane, which he continued successfully until the breaking out of the Gympie goldfields, to which, as an old miner, his inclinations naturally attracted him, and there he went through two years of hard and successful working at his business. He then came back to Brisbane, and hearing of tin discoveries at Stanthorpe came up and started in business here, and finally settled in this township for the past 15 years. About two years since he took a trip home, accompanied by his wife, not being very well at the time, and returned apparently in the very best of health and spirits. Although 74 years of age, he was very active, and his very graphic accounts of earlier experiences were often a source of great pleasure to listen to and many a pleasant evening your correspondent has passed with him surprised at his wonderful retentive memory. The funeral took place on Friday last, and was largely attended, and great sympathy is expressed by all classes for Mrs. Brown in her sudden bereavement.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, April 28, 1887:

As great interest is taken in this town by the many friends of Mr. E. Hawkins, who was so cruelly murdered at Tieryboo while asleep in his bed, in the trial of the supposed murderers, we notify to our readers that we have made special arrangements to be supplied by telegram with all the evidence to be given at the police investigation. In another column [see next entry] will be found the evidence of Dr. Howlin given at Dalby yesterday. The head of the murdered man has been removed from the body in order to assist in the conviction of those who are supposed to be guilty of his death.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, April 28, 1887:

William Clayton and Catherine Clayton, his wife, who are in custody on suspicion of being concerned in the murder of Mr. Edwin Hawkins at Tieryboo station, were brought to Dalby from Miles by yesterday's train, in charge of Senior Sergeant Flynn and Detective Clarke. The latter has been sent by the Brisbane authorities specially to watch the case.

The prisoners were brought up at the police court here this morning, and great interest was manifested in the proceedings. The first witness called was William Howlin, who, being duly sworn, deposed: I am a legally qualified medical practitioner; on Wednesday, the 20th inst., at the request of the Police Magistrate of Dalby, I proceeded to Miles, and on the next day, the 21st inst., to Condamine township, for the purpose of exhuming and making a post mortem examination of the body of Edwin Hawkins. The grave was opened out, the coffin taken up and opened, and the body removed to enable me to conduct the examination. I removed the skull and found a bullet wound about one inch and a half above the right ear, passing through portions of the temporal and parital bones. There was also a wound on the left orbit corresponding to the one on the right side. The bullet passed through the head and made its exit on the left side. The hair over the right ear was singed, showing that the weapon must have been discharged very close to the head. I examined the room in the house at Tieryboo which deceased occupied, and also the bedding. In the pillow was a round hole such as might be caused by the bullet produced. [The bullet found under the pillow was here handed to witness.] I fitted the bullet to the wound in the head of deceased and it corresponded exactly. I subsequently removed the skull for the purpose of macerating it; I did so, and found the roof of the skull completely shattered. The skull is still in my possession. I am of opinion the shot was fired in close proximity to the head, and that death was instantaneous.

An application was here made for a remand for eight days. The remand was granted, and it was decided that the remand should be granted to Miles, where the case will be heard on Wednesday, the 4th of May next.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, April 28, 1887:

Early yesterday morning a most determined suicide was committed in a paddock at the back of the Gowrie Road Hotel. Nearly a fortnight ago a man named Todd, who said he was a cook, and it is believed that he served in that capacity at Cecil Plains, called at the hotel and sought accommodation. It was afforded. At the end of the first week Todd informed Mr. J. Perkins, the landlord, that he was hard up, and that he could not pay him for the coming week's board. Mr. Perkins told Todd that he might make the hotel his home for a few days on the understanding that he paid his bill as soon as he obtained employment. Todd remained at the hotel as usual; he was most temperate in his habits and respectful in his demeanor to everybody. About ten o'clock on Tuesday night he was seen to go [to] bed. Early on Wednesday morning the door of his bedroom was open, but Todd was not inside. No suspicion of anything wrong having transpired was entertained, but deceased not appearing [at] the breakfast table questions were asked concerning his whereabouts. After breakfast time Mr. Perkins took a walk around the paddock behind the hotel, and there to his horror saw the dead body of Todd with a most frightful gash across the throat. Mr. Perkins, without touching the body, immediately rode into town and gave information of the occurrence to Inspector Harris. Mounted Constable McCabe proceeded to the paddock, and found the body as left by Mr. Perkins with a blood stained razor at its side. Dr. Roberts was immediately sent for, and on his arrival the body was removed by his instructions to the hospital morgue. The police authorities took charge of the deceased's possessions which consisted of an ordinary bushman's swag containing articles of clothing. No cause can be assigned for the deceased's rash deed. On Tuesday night he appeared to be in his usual health and free from despondency. A magisterial inquiry will be held in the course of a day or two.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, May 5, 1887:

The unfortunate and sad death of Mr. Charles Moore has thrown a gloom over this town. It is unnecessary and unpleasant to recapitulate the circumstances, but Charley Moore coming to his death by his own hand has something appalling in it. He will (says yesterday's Western Star) be best remembered here as the genial host of the Royal Mail Hotel at the time when Cobb and Co., were a local institution. About two years since he removed to the Bowen Hotel. Latterly his business circumstances have not been good, and it is this that is supposed to have preyed on his mind. That he was highly respected, the large funeral yesterday - one of the largest ever seen in Roma, will testify to. He has been a member of the Municipal Council for several years, and although he was more remarkable for his quiet bearing than as a debater, he often made it apparent that he was possessed of good common sense, and used it for the good of the community. The members of the Protestant Alliance Society attended the obsequies, in which they took the leading part one of their officers reading the services for the dead. The Rev. A. Allnutt conducted the Church of England service at the cemetery. The deceased leaves a wife and four young children.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, May 31, 1887:

In our telegrams today the death is announced of Raymond James Leigh. He was the editor of the Charleville Times. Three years ago he filled an editorial chair in this town. As a press writer he was far above the average wielder of colonial pens. He was scholarly, he was clever, he was gentlemanly, he was genial and warm hearted. Before him, had he chosen to tread it, was a bright literary career. Young, talented, and a winsome manner. We have worked with him side by side, held widely differing views, but agreed to differ, and were more than common acquaintances. But he had a weakness - he was his greatest enemy. He has now passed that bourne from whence no traveller returns. He departed suddenly to the great hereafter, and during our knowledge of him we can say he was never guilty of wilfully and maliciously harming anyone. In the political field he fought to the bitter end, and when unfairness tarnished his fight it was the promptings and commands of others than poor Raymond J. Leigh. We in deep sincerity say peace be to his ashes.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, May 31, 1887:

On Monday night (reports the Braidwood Despatch of Saturday last) an old resident of Forbes, named William Martin, a farmer and selector, met his death in a singular manner. While unharnessing his horse, after a visit to Forbes, he slapped the horse on the rump to move him out of the shafts. The horse kicked him in the abdomen, inflicting fatal injuries, and he died in a short time. Late on Saturday evening a fatal accident occurred on the road between Geelong and Waurn Ponds, the victim being a married man named James Harwood, a wood carter. He was in town on Saturday, and left for home, accompanied by a man named Radford, and after passing Waurn Ponds bridge the vehicle in which deceased was seated passed over a heap of stones, was upset, and, falling on Harwood, killed him on the spot.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, June 2, 1887:

Quite a gloom was cast over the town on Tuesday morning when it became known that Mr. H.D. Caswell, of Euston, had died at an early hour of the morning from the effects of what was considered a slight accident which occurred a few days previously. On Thursday last the deceased gentleman was returning to his residence from town, and was accompanied by his daughter. He was driving a cream colored pony which had not been accustomed to harness in a small dog cart, and he had been warned by friends not to be too confident in the animal he was driving. A short distance from Euston the pony shied at something in the road, and then became restive and finally bolted, the vehicle passing over a stump, the concussion being so violent that both occupants were thrown out in opposite directions. Both father and daughter were more or less injured, but not seriously, and no one anticipated at the time that fatal results would ensue. Mr. Caswell, however, had for some time past been in failing health, and his profound grief at the loss of his wife and daughter not very long since had been very noticeable by his friends who had tried all means to alleviate his sorrow and render him more cheerful and hopeful. The shock to the system occasioned by the accident was very severe, and added to general debility, defied all the efforts of the best medical skill. Deceased never rallied, and death took place early on Tuesday morning. He leaves a family of seven to mourn their loss. The funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon, and was attended by a large circle of sorrowing friends. The Venerable Archdeacon Jones officiated at the grave.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, June 2, 1887:

Referring to the death of a woman in a tunnel near Murrurundi, through a mail train passing over her, a telegram in last Saturday's S.M. Herald says:- An inquest was held this afternoon at Murrurundi before Mr. F.W. Parker, coroner, and a jury of 12, at Doughboy Hollow, on the body of a woman named Kate Coyle, who was killed yesterday evening in the Liverpool Range tunnel by a train passing over her. The following verdict was returned, viz.:- "That deceased was killed by the up mail train running over her, and that death was purely accidental." A rider was added to the effect that persons should be prohibited from traveling through the tunnel. The body presented a sickening appearance. One leg was severed, and the other nearly so, and there was an extensive fracture of the front bone of the forehead. Dr. Bell stated that deceased was suffering from weakness of the heart, and once before she fainted in the tunnel. It is thought probable that Mrs. Coyle was killed while in a fainting fit.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, June 9, 1887:

At ten o'clock on Tuesday night Mr. Inspector Harris received a telegram from Crosshill stating that Timothy Spillane had been found dead in his room. A mounted constable was at once despatched to Crosshill, with instructions to the effect that if there were any apparent suspicious circumstances, or if the presence of a doctor was required, to wire at once to the head station. No wire was received yesterday afternoon, and it may therefore be inferred that there are no suspicious circumstances surrounding the death. The deceased Spillane is the husband of the woman Spillane now serving a life sentence in Toowoomba gaol in connection with the death of the late Michael Irwin.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, June 11, 1887:

We regret to learn that a telegram was received from Brisbane on Thursday, announcing the death on that morning in the Brisbane Hospital, of Mr. Charles A. Lovejoy, proprietor of the tannery, at Klien's Crossing, Gowrie Creek.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, June 14, 1887:

It is with very deep regret that we record the death of the Rev. William Lambie Nelson, D.D. On Saturday morning a telegram was received from Southport by Mr. H.M. Nelson, M.L.A., announcing his father's serious illness, and requesting his attendance at his bedside. Yesterday morning a telegram from Southport announced the reverend gentleman's death at the ripe age of 84 years. The Rev. Dr. Nelson was the oldest Presbyterian clergyman in Queensland. When the State Aid Abolition Act was passed in 1860 the rights of those clergymen then receiving State aid were acknowledged, and a clause was inserted in the Act continuing the State allowance to them so long as they should continue to officiate in Queensland. Dr. Nelson was one. On the Estimates last year only two names of clergymen appeared - viz., the Rev. Canon Glennie and the Rev. Dr. Nelson. The Rev. B. Glennie is now the only clergyman left of those whose interests were protected in the State Aid Abolition Act of 1860.

In his early career in this colony, the late Dr. Nelson tried his hand at squatting. He was the owner of Tartha Station, on the Moonie River, but it was not a success. The difficulties of a squatter of those days were very different to what they are now, with railway communication and electric telegraphs. Dr. Nelson subsequently settled in the vicinity of Ipswich and ministered to the Presbyterian congregations in the West Moreton District, extending his pastoral visitations to Toowoomba anbd Drayton and other parts of the Darling Downs. At the first general election of the Queensland Legislative Assembly in May 1860, Dr. Nelson stood as a candidate for the representation of West Moreton which was to return three members. He was returned as one of the sitting members, but on the meeting of the first Parliament a petition was presented to the Assembly against his return on the ground that being an ordained clergyman he was disqualified for election. The petition was referred to the Committee of Elections and Qualifications, and after taking evidence a report was brought up declaring Dr. Nelson's election null and void. The Rev. gentleman then devoted all his energies to his clerical duties, and for years he continued one of the most earnest and zealous ministers of the Presbyterian Church. Naturally fond of literature he was an omnivirous reader, and in his discourses he turned his vast stores of book knowledge to good account. Although his discourses were considered lengthy for modern days when twenty minutes is considered the maximum time for a sermon, they were never tedious, but breathed throughout a deep religious feeling, a profound knowledge of theology and a facility of application of his homely similies to the everyday concerns of life. His early missionary work, as one of the pioneer clergymen of the colony, will long be remembered by the scores and hundreds of families who sat under the Rev. gentleman's ministrations. Dr. Nelson's only daughter was married to Mr. John Watts, formerly one of the owners of Eton Vale Station, but she died suddenly of heart disease in 1863, during her husband's visit to England. His only surviving son is Mr. H.M. Nelson, M.L.A., of Gabbinbar near Toowoomba, and London near Dalby. The first wife of the Rev. gentleman died at Gabbinbar about eighteen months ago at a good old age. The death of the Rev. Dr. Nelson removes from our midst an old familiar figure - one identified with the early history of the colony, who did his share worthily and well to advance its best interests, and to promote the moral and spiritual well being of the various congregations committed to his care.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, June 28 1887:

On Saturday evening an accident which has terminated fatally happened to a man named Michael Flynn, near Cambooya station. From what we can gather the deceased was driving home and when near Cambooya pitched head foremost from his cart, and was rendered unconscious. Dr. Roberts was passing on horseback at the time and advised that the man should be removed to the hospital. As far as we can learn he was taken in an unconscious state to the Cambooya hotel where he died yesterday morning without having regained consciousness.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, June 28, 1887:

Last Friday at Dunolly, Victoria, Elizabeth Anderson, aged 16, was accidentally killed during her father's absence, in a singular manner. Deceased went out of the house to get some wood from a fallen tree. One end of a limb was resting on a tree, and the other on the ground, and it is surmised that the deceased was endeavoring to pull it down, when it canted the wrong way, striking her on the back of her neck and jamming her against the trunk. Her sister found her in this position, but was unable to remove the limb, as it was too heavy. She spoke to the deceased, but received no answer. She had to go several miles for assistance, and it was nearly two hours before the body was removed. It took three men to remove the limb. The doctor stated that he believed death was instantaneous. The family have suffered severe affliction recently. The mother died about eight months ago, a brother had his leg broken, and they have lost two valuable horses within the last two months. The deceased was the eldest daughter, and managed the house. There are several small children.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, June 28, 1887:

At the early age of 21 years, Mr. G.H. Beer, son of Mr William Beer, well known in this town, died last Saturday from a combination of disease brought on by a serious cold less than a fortnight ago. The deceased young man was deservedly respected by all who knew him, and his early death will be greatly regretted by many. The funeral took place on Sunday when his mortal remains were followed to their last resting place in the cemetery by a large number of friends including his brethren in the Rechabite lodge, of which he was a member. The Rev. F. Duesbury conducted the funeral service for the dead, after which the Rechabite service was read over the body.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, July 5, 1887:

On Friday night a man named William Morganwick, aged 53 years, was admitted into the Toowoomba Hospital suffering from injuries said to have been caused by a piece of wood having been driven with violence, by a circular saw, against his chest and neck while engaged as a sawyer at Messrs. Filshie and Broadfoot's mill. Dr. Sheaf examined the wounds and found that the collar bone was shattered and the wind pipe injured, and also some of the veins of the neck. Dr. Sheaf stated that the case was hopeless, but every thing that could be done by the nursing staff to relieve the pain of Morganwick's last moments, was at once cheerfully undertaken. Death put an end to his sufferings at 10 o'clock on Saturday morning. A post mortem examination conducted by Dr. Sheaf in the afternoon, disclosed injuries so extensive that recovery was quite impossible under any circumstances.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, July 5, 1887:

The Warwick Argus of Saturday records the death of a gentleman who has been long and favorably known in connection with the Drayton and Toowoomba Agricultural and Horticultural Society. For several years he gave his services gratuitously as judge of wheat and other grains and his high character inspired the greatest confidence in his decisions. Our contemporary says: "The demise is announced this week of a prominent figure in local public affairs. We allude to Mr. James McKeachie, who during the two years from 1879 to 1881 filled the position of Mayor of Warwick. The news of Mr. KcKeachie's death, which occurred on Thursday evening, caused a very general feeling of painful surprise, for none but his intimate friends were aware he was hailing. The cause of death, we understand, was congestion of the lungs. Deceased was well advanced in years. He came to Warwick about a quarter of a century ago, and was connected with the Ellinthorpe flour mills during the proprietary of the Messrs. Clark. He afterwards established a saw mill, but unfortunately did not succeed very well. He was a mechanical engineer, and when a young man served for a considerable time in the German Navy."

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, July 9, 1887:

A sad sudden death (says Monday's Maryborough Chronicle) is reported from Pialba. Mr. O'Hagan, the newly appointed head teacher of the Pialba State School and successor to Mr. Barkell, dropped down dead on Saturday night from a fit of apoplexy. Mr. W. Dawson, J.P., who was at Pialba at the time, held an inquiry, and the deceased was buried in the Pialba cemetery yesterday afternoon. Mr. O'Hagan leaves behind him a wife and six children who have just come amongst strangers. He was well known by older residents in Maryborough, as he was formerly a teacher in the Maryborough Catholic school.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, July 16, 1887:

Mr. Inspector Harris has received a telegram from Stanthorpe stating that Mrs. Smith, the wife of a jeweler living in Maryland Street, left her home about 3 o'clock on Thursday afternoon. She told her husband she intended to visit a neighbor. She did not, however, and not returning home a search was instituted by the police, with the result that the lifeless body of Mrs. Smith was found in Quart Pot Creek about half a mile from town. Deceased had been in delicate health for some time, and had been unusually melancholy for the past few days. There is no suspicion of foul play.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, July 21, 1887:

We regret to announce the death of one of our well known fellow townsmen - namely, Mr. Charles Pottinger, junr., Hume Street, who departed this life upon the 16th inst., at his late residence. The deceased was born in our sister town of Drayton 32 years ago, and for some three years he represented the South Ward in our Municipal Council, during which term, by his urbanity and gentlemanly demeanor, he won the respect of his fellow councillors and all whom he came in contact with. In fact, no better proof of this could be given than that of the funeral cortege which was one of the largest that traversed Ruthven Street since Toowoomba came into existence. With his numerous friends we tender our sincere sympathy to his widow and child in their sad bereavement.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, July 28, 1887:

Yesterday's Dalby Herald says: In our last issue we described the sudden and mysterious disappearance of Mr. Jessop's little son Robert, aged three years. It is now our painful duty to have to record the recovery of the body of the little fellow, on Saturday morning last, in a well at the rear of Mr. Jessop's premises. The well was always kept covered with heavy slabs, and was apparently quite secure. However, it is certain that one of the slabs must have been accidentally displaced, and as the little boy was playing around, he unfortunately fell into the well. As the well was found in a covered condition shortly after the search was instituted for the missing one, on Wednesday night, it is probable that some of the search party in their great anxiety to recover the lost lad, finding the well open, replaced the coverings, so as to prevent accident. We have only to add that the greatest sympathy is expressed for Mr. and Mrs. Jessop, for their sudden and sad bereavement.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, July 30, 1887:

A general feeling of regret pervaded the town on the morning of the 18th instant (says the Bundaberg Star), when it became known that Mr. Aubrey Turner - assistant to Mr. J. Davidson, chemist had left his home on the previous day, after penning a letter expressing his intention to die by his own hand. Mr. Turner was 25 years of age, and has only been a resident of this town since the 27th June, when he arrived from Sydney. The letter which he addressed to his employer reads as follows: "Dear sir, - You know what trouble is, and how it alters a man. My troubles are different to yours and weigh on me just as heavily as yours do on you. It would be a long story to explain all to you, and I feel too weary for it; but I really am sorry to grieve you, as I know I must when I tell you that as you read this I am lying dead in the bush by my own hand. I feel the sin but in truth fear life more than death. I have written to my chum in Sydney: please send my effects to him, and draw out my money and send it with them. If you care to, you can select anything from among my possessions as a memento of your late assistant. - AUBREY TURNER." The unhappy young man was found by the police on Monday morning, 18th July, within a quarter of a mile of the cemetery, and as he manifested strong symptoms of poisoning, was conveyed to the hospital without delay. In spite, however, of every attention and care he continued to sink rapidly, and breathed his last shortly after 5 o'clock. Mr. Davidson states that the deceased during his stay here behaved himself in a most exemplary manner, and by his quiet and gentlemanly deportment endeared himself to all around. He was a duly qualified chemist and could not therefore have felt any embarrassment respecting his future. Mr. Davidson expresses himself as quite unable to assign any cause for the rash act. At the dinner table on Sunday deceased had been even gayer than was the wont of a man possessing his equable temperament. He was a member of the Presbyterian congregation in this town.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, August 11, 1887:

On the night of the 14th February last a tragedy was enacted in Constance Street, Fortitude Valley, which was kept from the knowledge of the police authorities for nearly five months, principally through the reticence of the victim. The facts of the case are these. On the night mentioned a tram driver named John Ward, a fine able bodied man, aged about 30 years, went to a house occupied by a woman in Constance Street, Valley. While he was there a Mrs. Hurley appeared on the scene, being, it is said, somewhat under the influence of drink. She says she asked for protection from her husband who she stated had threatened to murder her. Patrick Hurley followed her shortly afterwards and had in his belt a shingling hammer, a combined instrument half axe, half hammer. Hurley resided with his wife in Ann Street. He is about 38 years of age and had previously been a farmer, but latterly was working as a bricklayer's laborer. He was accompanied, when he followed his wife to the house in Constance Street, by his little daughter. He made a disturbance outside, demanding his wife and using strong language, and Ward went out and succeeded in inducing him to go away. Shortly afterwards Hurley returned, and on Ward going out again a dispute took place, which resulted in the latter being struck over the head with the shingling hammer. The wound bled profusely and Ward was stunned. Hurley went away, and next morning Ward, who did not think his wound very serious went to his work, keeping the affair secret from his companions, and he evidently did not wish it to be known where he had been. He had to stop work during the morning, and went to his lodgings, and his condition became so serious that medical assistance was called in. Shortly after Ward was removed to the hospital suffering from a form of paralysis, and as he said nothing about the wound on his head, which by this time had nearly healed up, the doctors were puzzled as to the cause of the paralysis. On Dr. Jackson's return from a holiday trip he discovered the wound, and on opening it found the skull fractured. An operation was performed, but the injured man sank gradually, and died in July. Dr. Jackson, thinking the case was an accident, made no special report on it, and Ward was buried. Subsequently the police got an inkling of the affray between Hurley and the deceased, and the body, after being buried, was exhumed, and a post mortem examination made. It was found that an abscess had formed on the brain in the locality of the injury, and had been the immediate cause of death. Inquiries were at once made for Hurley, and it was found that he had gone to Bundaberg, leaving his wife and family in Brisbane. A telegram was sent on there ordering his arrest, and he was quietly secured and brought down here by steamer. On Saturday morning last he was charged at the Police Court with the murder of Ward, and after the evidence of the arresting constable was taken was remanded until Thursday next. - Courier.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, August 20, 1887:

Many of our readers, particularly those of Drayton, will be familiar with the name of Mr. George Cook. Twenty years ago he was a prominent resident of Drayton, a member of the Municipal Council, and a hard working and energetic colonist. Under the Land Act of 1868 he selected a first class agricultural farm on the banks of Lockyer Creek, near Gatton, and from that time to this he has been one of the most prominent men of the district. He ever took a lively interest in all political events, and no election meeting at Gatton was complete without the genial presence of Mr. Cook. For a few days past he suffered from a severe cold, and a slight attack of rheumatism, but no member of his family nor his medical attendant thought death was so near. Yesterday morning, at half past two o'clock, he complained of a pain in the region of his heart, and said to those near his bedside that he would not like to die yet, for the sake of his young family. He had scarcely uttered the words when he fell back on his pillow and quietly expired. His death will be a severe loss to the Gatton district, for he was one of the foremost men of that locality, and a very industrious farmer. He was one of the first to draw attention to the splendid agricultural capabilities of the district, and may be classed as one of the most successful farmers in the colony. He leaves a wife and large family to mourn his sudden death at the early age of 47 years. Deceased was a brother in law of Mr. Quinn, of Messrs. Macdonald and Quinn of this town. The funeral will take place on Sunday morning at ten o'clock.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, September 1, 1887:

We sincerely regret to announce the death of Mr. McHugh's clever little son Edward, at the early age of 12 years. This boy gave great promise of being a good man. young as he was, he afforded great amusement at several concerts which have been held at Toowoomba and other places in the Darling Downs district. A few days ago he was seized with an attack of inflammation of the bowels, to which he succumbed.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, October 11, 1887:

On Saturday telegrams were received in Toowoomba announcing the death on that morning of the Rev. C.F.A. Scheirmeister, the President of the German Lutheran Synod of Queensland. The rev. gentleman was the oldest German clergyman in this colony and for years he was the only German Minister who officiated on the Darling Downs. To many of the Germans of this town, Mr. Scheirmeister was a much beloved pastor. He married many of them in the early days, and baptised many of their children, and the latter, now grown many of them to manhood and womanhood, cherish for him the most affectionate regard. His venerable patriarchal form will be missed by many in this town and district. At the evening service at St. James Church the hymns sung were appropriate to the death of a friend and at the close of his sermon the Venerable Archdeacon Jones, paid a touching tribute of respect to the memory of the deceased clergyman. he characterised him as one who in a quiet unostentatious manner had worked in the cause of his Master for more than a quarter of a century, and his memory would be kept green when men of wealth and ostentation would be forgotten. As one who had been brought into personal contact with him he could say that Mr. Scheirmeister was ever found faithful, zealous, and true. At the close of the service the "Dead March in Saul" was played on the organ most impressively by Mr. Wood. We take the following from yesterday's Courier:- The many friends of the Rev. C.F.A. Scheirmeister will regret to learn of his demise, which occurred on Saturday morning, at a quarter past 10 0'clock. The rev. gentleman has been ailing for over twelve months, but took to his bed last Saturday week, and expired peacefully after a heavy illness. He was born on the 22nd July, 1814, at Newstadt Eberswalde, in Prussia, studied at the University of Halle, and was one of the missionaries sent out by the Rev. J. Goszner. He landed at the Chatham Islands in 1842, where he laboured until 1857, in which year, on account of ill health, he left for Australia. He resided in Sydney for some little time, after which he sailed to Moreton Bay. During his thirty year's residence in Queensland, Mr. Schirmeister founded many congregations (amongst others those at German Station, Toowoomba and Ipswich), but has always held the pastorate of the Lutheran Church, Wickham Terrace, and has been the president of the Lutheran Synod since its establishment. Few men took a deeper interest in the religious matters of the city, and his presence will be missed at the meetings of the various movements connected with Christianity. Service was conducted in the Wickham Terrace Church, which was heavily draped, yesterday morning by the Rev. T. Langebecker, of Toowoomba, and the deceased pastor was referred to in the sermon. The funeral took place in the afternoon. The Rev. E. Heiner, of Ipswich, gave an address in the church, and the usual service appointed to be read was gone through, after which the cortege, consisting of upwards of 800 persons, moved to the Toowong General Cemetery. On arrival at the grave, the Rev. E. Griffith briefly addressed the assemblage, paying a high tribute to the deceased gentleman, whom he said he had known for a number of years, and he said was not only a good man, but a good minister. The Rev. J. Egan read a short history of the deceased gentleman, after which the Gesangverin sand the 23rd Psalm. The last rites of the Church were performed by the Rev. E. Heiner. The scene at the grave was a most impressive and affecting one. The deceased gentleman was in his 74th year, and leaves a widow and two married daughters.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, October 15, 1887:

The circumstances of what appears to be one of the most shocking tragedies enacted in Brisbane came to light on Thursday morning (says yesterday's Courier). It seems that a Mrs. Davis, who had been left in penurious circumstances and with three young children by her husband some time back was sheltered by a Mr. Tudman and allowed to live with his family at Paddington. Yesterday morning Mrs. Davis left the house and took with her, her little girl and a baby in her arms, leaving a boy aged 5 years behind. Mrs. Tudman soon after found the following letter addressed to her by Mrs. Davis:- "My dear Mrs. Tudman, you have been a friend to me, and may God reward you for it. When you see this I shall be at the bottom of the river. I leave George with you if you will let him stay; if not give him to somebody else. I had rather you let him stay with you. Good bye, and God be with you." The letter was placed in the hands of the police. Yesterday morning, at about 8 o'clock, a man named Crow saw three hats lying on the bank of the river, and shortly after found the body of a little girl about 300 yards above the place where the landslip took place, on the North Quay. The body was taken to the morgue. Since then the body of a little boy was found near the same place and was also taken to the morgue, and steps are being taken to have them identified. The Petrie Terrace police dragged the river all day for the body of the unfortunate mother; but at nightfall when they ceased searching they had failed to find it. The police, however, entertain no doubt that she has drowned herself. The body may not be recovered for some days, as it is impossible to determine to what part of the river it has drifted. Very little is known about the unfortunate woman.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, October 18, 1887:

A recent telegram announced the death of Mr. Arthur Martin, senior, for many years Government Auctioneer in Brisbane. Some time ago he disposed of bis business to Mr. M. B. Gannon, and since then has twice made the tour to Europe for the benefit of his health. He was present at the opening of the International Exhibition at Adelaide, and at the time of his death the deceased gentleman was residing with a relative at Melbourne. The cause of death was a general break up of the system. The deceased gentleman leaves one son, Mr. Arthur Martin, who is following the business of his late father, and one daughter, the wife of Mr. W.H. Snelling of Brisbane.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, October 20, 1887:

With a certain amount of surprise and a greater amount of regret, news was received in town on Tuesday morning that Mrs. W. Bowden, of Pittsworth, died the previous night at Mr. Loveday's Hotel on the Drayton Road. For some time past Mrs. Bowden had been suffering from a chronic affection, and its acuteness was accelerated by the hard work and worry consequent upon the preparations for the festivities in connection with the opening of the Pittsworth line. She became worse, and took up her residence at Mrs. Loveday's on purpose to be within nearer call of medical advice. She, however, died on Monday night. The funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon. It was conducted by the Rev. Father O'Connell, and was largely attended.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, October 20, 1887:

Sir St. George Ralph Gore, bart., died at Brisbane on Monday at the age of 46 years. He joined the civil service of this colony about 18 years ago, and until recently held the position of Immigration Agent. He had been ailing for some time, and his death was not altogether unexpected. The funeral of the deceased took place at the General Cemetery, Toowong, on Tuesday afternoon. The burial service was read by the Rev. H. Guinness, and among those present were Sir A.H. Palmer, M.L.C., Mr. Justice Harding, the Hon. C. Holmes A'Court, Mr. C.H. Buzacott, Mr. R. Gailey, and a number of other gentlemen.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, October 22, 1887:

A fatal accident happened at Pittsworth on Thursday afternoon, the victim being Mr. William Murphy, aged about 22, a native of Toowoomba. The deceased was engaged in doing some plumbing work at Pittsworth, but on Thursday evening about six o'clock, he, as one very fond of horses and riding mounted a flash young horse. As far as can be gathered the horse became unguidable and ran against a tree, dislodging the rider. Murphy was thrown, and when found was unconscious and bleeding from the mouth profusely. In an unconscious state he was conveyed to Mr. B. McKewin's Hotel. A lady residing in the district did all she could for the injured man, but all efforts were unavailing and he died about four o'clock yesterday morning. It is a strange coincidence that the deceased's father met with his death in a similar manner. The late Mr. Murphy, senr., was the governor of Toowoomba Gaol, and in 1871 he was thrown from a restive horse in the gaol paddock and fatally injured. We understand that an inquiry into the cause of the accident was held at Pittsworth yesterday, after which the body was brought to Toowoomba by Mr. J. Oelkers, the brother in law of the deceased, the burial of which takes place today at half past two. General regret was expressed in town yesterday that the deceased, who was a fine young fellow, should have met with such an untimely end. At Pittsworth much sorrow was expressed for the deceased's relations in their sad bereavement.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, October 29, 1887:

A Chinaman, named Wy Young, formerly working as a gardener near the Toowoomba railway station, was found dead in the garden hut on Thursday afternoon. Deceased with several others lived in the humpy in the gardens, and on Thursday morning Wy Young cooked the breakfast for his countrymen. Immediately after breakfast, of which deceased did not partake, he went to bed. One of his mates spoke to him at 11.30 a.m., and that was the last time he was seen alive. At half past five in the afternoon he was found dead in bed. The body was removed to the Hospital morgue, and yesterday Dr. Roberts made a post mortem examination, and discovered that the cause of death was cerebral hemorrhage.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, November 5, 1887:

The S.M. Herald announces the death of Mr. James Manning, who died at his residence, Double Bay, on Wednesday last, at the age of seventy-three. Mr. Manning was an early initiator of the meat freezing and preserving operations carried on in Australia, and, for a short time, he had a place at Town Marie, near Ipswich, in Queensland, where he preserved meats. He was a younger brother of Sir William Manning, lately Primary Judge of New South Wales, and was also a brother of Mr. A.W. Manning, formerly Under-Colonial Secretary Queensland.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, November 5, 1887:

A woman named (says the Courier) A. Ullathorne, wife of Southey O. Ullathorne, committed suicide by hanging herself at her residence, Cochrane Street, Paddington, Brisbane, on Thursday morning. The unfortunate woman was last seen alive at about half past 8 o'clock the night before, and was talking to a neighbour at that hour. She seemed very much distressed on account of her husband having gone away. Ullathorne had been employed by the Graziers' Butchering Company at their shop at Red Hill, and left home rather suddenly and for reasons which will doubtless be divulged later on. This morning a milkman went as usual to the house where the Ullathornes resided, but no one opened the door when he knocked, and a child was heard crying inside. A Mrs. Riggs, who lives near, went over and the door was opened, and Mrs. Ullathorne found hanging by a rope from one of the crossbeams of the house. She was left there while a policeman was brought, and about half an hour elapsed before she was cut down, but she had evidently been dead a couple of hours. The deceased was bout 25 years of age, and of slight figure. The cord with which she ended her existence was a thick hempen rope, and she had made it fast to the crossbeam, then mounted the table, tied the rope round her neck, and jumped off. The body was taken to the morgue and the usual examination will be held. The house occupied by the family was a neat three roomed little place, fairly furnished, and well supplied with the necessaries of life. Deceased prior to ending her life had locked her little daughter up in the bedroom. Several loose half sheets of notepaper were lying about the room, and on them Mrs. Ullathorne had written at considerable length, though there is a want of coherency in the writing which shows that she must have been in a very agitated state. Some of the paper has been written over several times, but the following is as nearly as can be made out the whole of the writing: - "I have acted silly all through. Oh; what did he go away and leave me to bear all this, as I don't know what to do with myself? I have never seen anything clearly until now. What a wicked woman all must think me, but God knows best. I fancy there is a policeman walking up and down, and I fancy he is watching me. If I do ---" the writing here seems broken off, but on another line it goes on, "Oh, my dear little child - do take care of her. I woke up just now - I saw all clearly - I can't live to face it out now. Oh, I am most wretched. I took some poison thinking I would soon die, but I have had time to think since then. I must finish myself somehow. I went down town yesterday to see if there were any letters from home. I got three newspapers. I lost my purse with 3 [pounds] in it - these 3 [pounds] have now I find - so I see all now what he has done - you will bring me up as a witness against him, so I can't - I see all clearly - bear that. Ask some one to take care of my little Nettie for her wretched mother and send word home. I don't see any other way out of this. Ask someone kindly to take care of my dear little Nettie, but please to try to get her sent home. I know all must think me very heartless to go and leave her, this innocent child, but I know someone will take her. I see all clearly now - the money. I woke up in the middle of the night, and this flashed into my head in a moment. May you forget and forgive me to require him to face it." The child has been taken care of by a neighbour, and the police are endeavouring to find out where the deceased's husband is.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, November 10, 1887:

Mrs. Annie Hamilton was found dead (says the Courier of yesterday) in a Mr. Wallace's house, James Street, Valley. When found she was in a stooping position, with her head in a large bucket, which had been placed on a small bench in her room. Water had been in the bucket, and her clothing was wet as if the water had poured out of the bucket on her. She was last seen alive at 11 o'clock yesterday morning by Lizzie Wallace, who supplied her with a bucket of water, which she took into her room, locking the door after her. Her absence having been noticed, the door was broken open, and she was found in the position above described. Dr. Byrne was at once called to see her, but declined to give a certificate as to the cause of death. The deceased, who was 56 years of age, was the wife of Mr. Samuel B. Hamilton, who died in the Brisbane Hospital a few weeks ago, and who at one time kept the Hamilton Hotel.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, November 10, 1887:

We (Saturday's Logan Witness) regret to record the sudden death of Mr. E. Lord, sen., in Beenleigh, on October 27, just before 1 o'clock. Mr. Lord who has been staying with his son, the manager of the Beenleigh bank, for some time, appeared quite well a few day's ago, and was in his usual good health. he was taken ill with a complaint of pain in the back. He lay in bed a little, but nothing serious was apprehended. Yesterday morning his daughter, Mrs. Raff, was up to see him, and he was suddenly worse just before 1 o'clock, and died directly. Mr. Lord was a tall hearty man for his great age, and walked, a few days ago, as upright as a soldier. He liked the Beenleigh climate, and jocularly used to say he was gaining flesh every day. He could tell a few stories of the old days in the colonies. He was born at Saddleworth, on the boundaries of Yorkshire and Lancashire. He was brought up to the wool business, and knew the Yorkshire wool town well. In about 1836 he landed in Tasmania, and followed the wool classing business there for some years. He gradually worked himself up the continent, from station to station, eventually getting to Brisbane with Arthur Hodgson, John Watt, and other squatters on the Darling Downs. He settled in Toowoomba, and occupied places of trust for the stations both there and in South Brisbane. He had a nice farm near Highfields, and used lately to spend his time visiting his children. He often used to express himself in admiration of the good roads there were in the Logan district, when telling bullock team yarns of early days; and he said that in all Australia he had never seen so young a place as Beenleigh where the inhabitants had worked so hard for that purpose. He attributed it to the sprinkling of Yorkshire blood there was about, with which he was always proud to claim acquaintance. He was about seventy-four years of age. [The bare announcement of Mr. Lord's death appeared in our obituary columns on Saturday. We may also add that the deceased gentleman is the father of Mrs. George Raff of Brisbane, and also of Mr. Edward Lord, the manager of Tarampa station. - ED. T.C.]

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, November 15, 1887:

A terrible accident occurred to Margaret Hansford, a young married woman (says the Courier) residing at Montague Road, on Thursday. It is supposed that she was seized with one of the fits to which she was subject and fell into the fire. The matter was reported to Constable Rourke, and on proceeding to the place he found she was terribly burned on several parts of her body and suffering great pain. The woman, who had only been married about two weeks, was at once removed to the hospital, but she gradually sank and died at 5 o'clock on Friday morning.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, November 17, 1887:

A sad case of burning occurred on the Newtown Estate about five o'clock on Tuesday evening. A little girl about four years of age, named Mary Gratton was playing with other children near a burning log a few yards away from the fence of her home, when by some means her dress caught fire. A neighbour who lives opposite, named Mrs. Hill, hearing screams, rushed out, and tore off the child's clothing, but she was badly burned from below the knees to the waist. Dr. Roberts was sent for, and the little sufferer is under his care, but lies in a precarious condition. [See also, next entry.]

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, November 19, 1887:

The little girl Mary Gratton, who was burned on Tuesday at Newtown Estate, succumbed to the injuries she received at 2 o'clock on Thursday morning.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, November 29, 1887:

The S.M. Herald of Saturday last reports the following singular death: - A boarded out boy named James Sivret, aged 12 years, met his death in a singular manner at Mittagong on Wednesday. He was apparently in perfect health at school at 12 o'clock, and while racing with another lad their heads came in violent collision. Half an hour afterwards Siveret complained of headache, and the teacher placed him on a form to rest, thinking he was suffering from biliousness. In a few minutes he fell off the form and was taken to a neighbour's house, where he was seized with violent fits. Medical aid was at once sent for, but when the doctor arrived the boy was dead. Dr. Newmarch made a post-mortem examination of the body, and found that the violent shock of the encounter with the other boy had ruptured the meningeal artery, and that death had resulted from blood pressure on the brain. He said the lad was particularly well nourished, but he had found the stomach to be on the border of inflammation, and presenting a most peculiar appearance. A large coloured lolly was exhibited at the inquest, a number similar to which it was stated the deceased had eaten on the day of his death. In reply to a question from Mr. Maxted, who attended the inquest on behalf of the State Children's Relief Board, Dr. Newmarch said that it was quite probable the irritated and inflamed state of the stomach (which had possibly aggravated the injury to the brain) might have been caused by eating these lollies; and at the request of the jury the inquest was adjourned for a week, in order that the contents of the stomach, and also the lolly produced at the inquest, might be sent to Sydney for analysis.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Tuesday, December 6, 1887:

A young woman named Nellie Brougham, 20 years of age, resident at Green Swam, near Bundarra, died on Sunday last from eating green plums. Dr. Knowles was summoned, but his services were of no avail. The girl died 48 hours after having eaten the fruit.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, December 10, 1887:

The peaceful village of Ryde was thrown into a state of excitement yesterday morning (says last Monday's S.M. Herald) by the announcement that a young man, while bathing devoured by a shark. It appears that between 11 and 12 o'clock a number of young men were bathing at the wharf. The tide was very high and the water was a considerable distance above the edge of the landing stage. A young man named Thomas Cochran and several others were standing in the water on the lower part of the stage, and the former took a back somersault into the river. He had just reached the wharf again, and was in the act of catching hold of a pile, when a large shark, estimated to be between 12 and 15 ft. long, darted up, seized the unfortunate man by the right side, and disappeared with its prey. Cochran exclaimed "Oh!" as he went out of sight, and then for a few seconds the water became tinged with blood. Subsequently the body came into view for a moment and then sank. A portion of the viscera of the deceased was left hanging to a portion of the wharf, and was recovered, but nothing had been seen of the body up to late yesterday evening. It is supposed that the tide either carried it away or that the voracious shark returned and completed its meal. Another young man, who was on the landing stage at the time of the occurrence had a remarkably narrow escape, the shark knocking him backwards with its tail in darting at Cochran. Deceased was 25 years of age, and was well known in the district of Ryde, where he had lately been in the employ of Mr. T. Small. He was unmarried. It is said that it was quite a common thing for young men to bathe at the Ryde Wharf on Sunday mornings, but this occurrence will no doubt act as a warning to them. The water police proceeded up the river during the afternoon to drag for the body. [Our Sydney telegraphic correspondent under Thursday's date says: - The body of the unfortunate young man, Thomas Cochran, who was seized by a shark while bathing at Ryde on Sunday, was found in the Parramatta River this afternoon. Both arms and shoulders, the leg from the knee, the abdomen, and the bones generally are stripped of flesh. The head is perfect, but the eyes are protruding. All the efforts to catch the shark which seized Cochran have so far proved futile. - ED. T.C.]

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Thursday, December 29, 1887:

Our (Courier) Southport correspondent says: - "The body of Joseph Derrick, the Governor's footman, whose death by drowning we recorded in yesterday's issue, was found on Thursday, and was interred the same afternoon in Southport cemetery. The funeral was attended by Lady Musgrave, Mr. Musgrave, Captain Prichard, Mr. Shand, and other members of the Governor's household. The service was read by the Rev. E. Meeres. The deceased was but 22 years of age, and was brought from England by the Governor on returning from his recent visit to the old country. Derrick has left a widow behind him. There seems to be no doubt whatever as to the manner of his death. Nerang Creek abounds with holes, and it was in one of these, said to be 25 ft. deep, that the body was eventually found.

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From the Toowoomba Chronicle and Darling Downs General Advertiser, Saturday, December 31, 1887:

It will be heard with regret by all who knew him that Mr. W.S. Drewe, the Downs representative of Messrs. Perkins & Co., succumbed early on Thursday morning to the injuries he received by being thrown from his buggy while returning from the Toowoomba Races on Monday. The funeral of the deceased took place yesterday at the Toowoomba cemetery. The cortege left Neil Street shortly after two o'clock, and it consisted of the hearse, two mourning coaches containing the relatives and intimate friends of the deceased, numerous private vehicles, in which were the leading hotel keepers of the town, and a good number of horsemen. The Ven. Archdeacon Jones officiated at the grave. The late Mr. Drewe was about 42 years of age, and he leaves a second wife and seven young children to lament his sudden and untimely death.


Darling Downs Obituaries, 1888.



Additional Links:

Deaths in the Melbourne Hospital - Index, 1867-1880.

Deaths at the Alfred Hospital and the Melbourne Benevolent Asylum - Index, 1872-1879.

Portraits of the Past.

Index of Nineteenth Century Photographic Portraits.

Descriptive Index of Great War Soldiers (from the Toowoomba Chronicle).

Hunter Robert Gordon Poon. - a brief sketch of the life of a World War 1 digger, of Chinese ancestry.

List of Qualified Jurors, Singapore, 1904; Names, A-L. - List of European, as well as local residents, who were registered to act as jurors, in the island of Singapore, at that time a colony of Great Britain.

List of Qualified Jurors, Malacca, 1904. A similar list of jurors at the settlement of Malacca.

List of Qualified Jurors, Penang, 1904. Another list of jurors, this one at the settlement of Penang.

The Eurasian Company of the Singapore Volunteer Corps. The Singapore Volunteer Corps was a militia unit formed in this British island colony in the 19th Century. At a later stage, island residents were permitted to enlist in the unit, resulting in the formation of Chinese, Malay and Eurasian Companies. This particular site relates to one of those Companies.




© Terry Foenander.

June, 2001.