Al.com

  • Birmingham
  • Huntsville
  • Mobile
  • Montgomery
  • Tuscaloosa
  • Beaches
  • All Alabama

Sign in

Sign in to Al.com

Close

TOP STORIES
VIDEO
Azalea Trail Run 2012: Shadrack Kosgei wins male 10K race
MOBILE, Alabama -- Thousands of runners pounded the downtown race course Saturday, March 24, 2012, for the annual Azalea Trail Run in Mobile. Runners, walkers and wheelchair athletes from across the globe competed in various levels. This Press-Register video captures Shadrack Kosgei crossing the finish line first in the 10K male race, and the Kenyan athlete shares his thoughts on the contest and the course moments later.

Azalea Trail Run 2012: Shadrack Kosgei wins male 10K race 11:43 AM MOBILE, Alabama -- Thousands of runners pounded the downtown race course Saturday, March 24, 2012, for the annual Azalea Trail Run in Mobile. Runners, walkers and wheelchair athletes from across the globe competed in various levels. This Press-Register video captures Shadrack Kosgei crossing the finish line first in the 10K male race, and the Kenyan athlete shares his thoughts on the contest and the course moments later.

SECond Look: Ole Miss offense aims to challenge Alabama 9:48 AM Sports Editor Randy Kennedy and sportswriter Mike Herndon preview Ole Miss vs. Alabama and talk about surprises elsewhere in the SEC in this installment of "SECond Look."

Operation Raging Winds 09.18.12 3:09 PM Personnel from the Alabama Department of Homeland Security conduct a practice rescue with other local and state agencies during Operation Raging Winds, a hurricane preparedness exercise on Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012 at Perdido Pass in Orange Beach, Ala.

PHOTO GALLERIES
LATEST COLUMNS
Kristen Campbell

Gene Owens

George Talbot
FORUMS
Mobile
More
Baldwin
More
BLOGS
For the Love
More
The following article is part of our archive

'Critical habitat' set for sturgeon

As some fear the Alabama fish has passed the point of no return, a plan has been formed to protect the endangered species
Tuesday, May 27, 2008
By SEAN REILLY
Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — Eight years after the federal government put the Alabama sturgeon on the endangered species list, it is poised today to name 326 miles in the Mobile River Basin as "critical habitat" needed to keep the species in existence.

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service will announce a plan to apply the habitat designation to 245 miles of river channel on the Alabama River and another 81 miles on a connected stretch of the lower Cahaba River, according to a Monday e-mail notice from Jeff Powell, a biologist in the agency's Daphne field office.

The proposal, which carries a 60-day public comment period, is required by a federal court order. A final decision is due by mid-May of next year, Powell said in the notice. Under federal law, critical habitat refers to specific areas essential for conservation of a threatened or endangered species, he said, and may require "special management and protection."

While members of an industry group have previously expressed concern that the designation could affect commercial river use, the Fish & Wildlife Service does not expect management of river flows to change, Powell said.

Bill Satterfield, a Birmingham attorney for the group, known as the Alabama-Tombigbee Rivers Coalition, could not be reached for comment Monday, a federal holiday.

About 30 inches long and weighing 2 to 3 pounds, the brassy orange sturgeon is one of the nation's most imperiled fish. Today's planned announcement — which will be published in a daily round-up of government actions known as the Federal Register — comes as some scientists fear that its numbers have dwindled to the vanishing point.

Since 1999, researchers have found only one fish. That specimen, netted last year at Claiborne Lock and Dam on the Alabama River, was a male. Hopes that he would lead scientists to more fish have so far not been borne out....

Read the full article



© 2012 Press-Register. All rights reserved.
This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

SHARE THIS STORY
The following article is part of our archive

'Critical habitat' set for sturgeon

As some fear the Alabama fish has passed the point of no return, a plan has been formed to protect the endangered species
Tuesday, May 27, 2008
By SEAN REILLY
Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — Eight years after the federal government put the Alabama sturgeon on the endangered species list, it is poised today to name 326 miles in the Mobile River Basin as "critical habitat" needed to keep the species in existence.

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service will announce a plan to apply the habitat designation to 245 miles of river channel on the Alabama River and another 81 miles on a connected stretch of the lower Cahaba River, according to a Monday e-mail notice from Jeff Powell, a biologist in the agency's Daphne field office.

The proposal, which carries a 60-day public comment period, is required by a federal court order. A final decision is due by mid-May of next year, Powell said in the notice. Under federal law, critical habitat refers to specific areas essential for conservation of a threatened or endangered species, he said, and may require "special management and protection."

While members of an industry group have previously expressed concern that the designation could affect commercial river use, the Fish & Wildlife Service does not expect management of river flows to change, Powell said.

Bill Satterfield, a Birmingham attorney for the group, known as the Alabama-Tombigbee Rivers Coalition, could not be reached for comment Monday, a federal holiday.

About 30 inches long and weighing 2 to 3 pounds, the brassy orange sturgeon is one of the nation's most imperiled fish. Today's planned announcement — which will be published in a daily round-up of government actions known as the Federal Register — comes as some scientists fear that its numbers have dwindled to the vanishing point.

Since 1999, researchers have found only one fish. That specimen, netted last year at Claiborne Lock and Dam on the Alabama River, was a male. Hopes that he would lead scientists to more fish have so far not been borne out....

Read the full article


How Does It Work?
SITE TOOLS
  • E-mail ThisE-mail This
  • Print ThisPrint This
  • NewslettersNewsletters
  • SPONSORED LINKS