STEAMY PRESS
johnfmalta:

Tee design for the London based publisher Steamy Press. Available soon!

Very, very soon.

johnfmalta:

Tee design for the London based publisher Steamy Press. Available soon!

Very, very soon.

1 Feb 2013 / Reblogged from johnfmalta with 37 notes

January Mixtape

In case you’re one of those that’s curious what others have been listening to, these tunes have all featured heavily in the soundtrack to January. Train journeys to outer London; Tube rides to meetings; bus-stop head-bops; and a few jazz flings to get the creative juices flowing.

(Source: steamypress.co.uk)

31 Jan 2013 / 2 notes

Something a little different for this week: postcard packs. Send them to friends, mount them in frames, or keep them in your collection.

In the furthest north-west corner of Ireland sits Donegal, a county defined by its terrain and the harsh winds of the Atlantic Sea. Days in Donegal are spent rambling in the hills, walking along beaches and exploring the rock pools and fishing spots. Nights are spent indoors by a peat fire, in a local pub or at home, in an area famed for the freshness of its seafood. And all the while, the wild Atlantic bashes relentlessly onto its rugged coastline.

These photographs were taken by Stephen Edwards, a Donegal native; and Steve Messer, a regular visitor to the county. The postcards display the incredible beauty of both the coastline and the landscape, and properly evoke that ‘Wish you were here’ glow.

Stephen Edwards is a 23-year-old photographer originally from Donegal, Ireland, now living in Glasgow, Scotland. For him, photographs have always been able to elicit a deep emotional response akin to a psychoactive effect. It is this power, coupled with an itch to document moments and memories, that drew him to the practice. His work demonstrates an innate ability to capture the events unfolding around him as honest as they occurred; each photograph a mix of the moment itself, and a keen eye for style.

Steve Messer is a 24-year-old photographer and publisher at Steamy Press.

4.13” x 5.82” 
Colour 
350gsm gloss lam 
4 pcs.

Due to limited stock, please view them in the shop and then get in contact to order a pack.

(Source: steamypress.co.uk)

28 Jan 2013 / 11 notes

For all you weekend web-surfers, here’s what you can expect from Steamy Press in 2013. 
The one thing that should be highlighted, though, is that open submission policy. It’s all about getting fresh blood out there – and, to be honest, it’s just great to get a look at new stuff! 
Don’t be shy, come say hi!

For all you weekend web-surfers, here’s what you can expect from Steamy Press in 2013. 

The one thing that should be highlighted, though, is that open submission policy. It’s all about getting fresh blood out there – and, to be honest, it’s just great to get a look at new stuff! 

Don’t be shy, come say hi!

26 Jan 2013 / 10 notes

BRISTOL!
Regretfully, we won’t be making an appearance at today’s OGA x TPC Now That’s What I Call Photography 30 exhibition and zine fair. We were going to rock up with a couple of zines for you but, unfortunately, we’re completely sold out of everything. Make sure you check out the tables though, speak to the people sat behind them, and have yourself a good time!
Here’s a sneak peek at projects in the pipeline, that you can get your grubby mitts on soon. As always, you can hit us up on the email, or use the ask/fan mail buttons at the top of the page.
Oh, and everyone loves The Best, right? Because it is: the best.

BRISTOL!

Regretfully, we won’t be making an appearance at today’s OGA x TPC Now That’s What I Call Photography 30 exhibition and zine fair. We were going to rock up with a couple of zines for you but, unfortunately, we’re completely sold out of everything. Make sure you check out the tables though, speak to the people sat behind them, and have yourself a good time!

Here’s a sneak peek at projects in the pipeline, that you can get your grubby mitts on soon. As always, you can hit us up on the email, or use the ask/fan mail buttons at the top of the page.

Oh, and everyone loves The Best, right? Because it is: the best.

23 Jan 2013 / 8 notes

That’s right – Everything Sucks is sold out. There is no happy here.
Once again, a huge ‘thank you’ from Steph and Steamy Press to everyone who bought a copy. The first edition was a fairly limited run but there’s the possibility of a second edition soon, so head on over to the Facebook page and put your name down for a copy. (If you don’t have Facebook, just email us at hello@steamypress.co.uk with ‘Everything Sucks second run’ in the subject line – and maybe say hi!)

That’s right – Everything Sucks is sold out. There is no happy here.

Once again, a huge ‘thank you’ from Steph and Steamy Press to everyone who bought a copy. The first edition was a fairly limited run but there’s the possibility of a second edition soon, so head on over to the Facebook page and put your name down for a copy. (If you don’t have Facebook, just email us at hello@steamypress.co.uk with ‘Everything Sucks second run’ in the subject line – and maybe say hi!)

22 Jan 2013 / 8 notes

Little more than one month ago, people from all over the globe were in disarray. Confusion and anxiety was rife – no one was sure of their own future. Millennia previous, an ancient civilisation had struck upon a date in the future when the world would pass into a new era. The date they predicted was 21 December 2012.
There were many myths surrounding the date, the most prevalent telling of an apocalypse that would occur, scouring the earth of all living life. The myth was rooted in a prophecy of change, the movement from one age of creation to another, each age with its own overseer. The deity reigning over the Fifth Age of Creation was to be Bolon Yokte’, a Meso-american god that most professional historians knew nothing about; it was supposed that he was a god of the underworld, and his investiture would mean certain death for mankind the world over.
Like most poorly sourced myths, the apocalypse did not occur. In the weeks leading up to that date, Steamy Press asked several curators and prevalent bloggers to put forward their favourite photographs – pictures that mapped the current state of the medium at the end of the Fourth Creation. As well as standing as a document to what had come before, Fourth Creation: Final Statement would be a motivational and inspirational publication to the Fifth Creation’s generation of photographers, and hopefully inspire a new realm of aesthetics.
The curators – Joscha Bruckert; Simon Marsham; Dimitri Karakostas & T. Reilly Hodgson; Igor Termenon; Romke Hoogwaerts; Jonathan Cherry; and Joe Skilton – each put forth ten of their favourite images. The array of artists on offer presents the spectrum of photography as it is: moving from abstract, ambiguous images through landscape photography, on to portraiture and snapshot perfection: a smorgasbord of modern photography.
Fourth Creation: Final Statement will be released first as a free ebook. More details to follow in the coming weeks.

Little more than one month ago, people from all over the globe were in disarray. Confusion and anxiety was rife – no one was sure of their own future. Millennia previous, an ancient civilisation had struck upon a date in the future when the world would pass into a new era. The date they predicted was 21 December 2012.

There were many myths surrounding the date, the most prevalent telling of an apocalypse that would occur, scouring the earth of all living life. The myth was rooted in a prophecy of change, the movement from one age of creation to another, each age with its own overseer. The deity reigning over the Fifth Age of Creation was to be Bolon Yokte’, a Meso-american god that most professional historians knew nothing about; it was supposed that he was a god of the underworld, and his investiture would mean certain death for mankind the world over.

Like most poorly sourced myths, the apocalypse did not occur. In the weeks leading up to that date, Steamy Press asked several curators and prevalent bloggers to put forward their favourite photographs – pictures that mapped the current state of the medium at the end of the Fourth Creation. As well as standing as a document to what had come before, Fourth Creation: Final Statement would be a motivational and inspirational publication to the Fifth Creation’s generation of photographers, and hopefully inspire a new realm of aesthetics.

The curators – Joscha Bruckert; Simon Marsham; Dimitri Karakostas & T. Reilly Hodgson; Igor Termenon; Romke Hoogwaerts; Jonathan Cherry; and Joe Skilton – each put forth ten of their favourite images. The array of artists on offer presents the spectrum of photography as it is: moving from abstract, ambiguous images through landscape photography, on to portraiture and snapshot perfection: a smorgasbord of modern photography.

Fourth Creation: Final Statement will be released first as a free ebook. More details to follow in the coming weeks.

21 Jan 2013 / 5 notes

So, just over 24 hours after its release, Steph Mill’s debut photo-zine, Everything Sucks, is almost sold out. A huge thanks going out to everyone that picked up a copy, and helped Steph’s first foray into publishing her material a great success. No doubt we’ll be seeing plenty more of her in the future!
Wait a minute, did we say almost sold out? That’s right: there’s only two copies left. Bag one from the shop or email hello@steamypress.co.uk to reserve a copy.

So, just over 24 hours after its release, Steph Mill’s debut photo-zine, Everything Sucks, is almost sold out. A huge thanks going out to everyone that picked up a copy, and helped Steph’s first foray into publishing her material a great success. No doubt we’ll be seeing plenty more of her in the future!

Wait a minute, did we say almost sold out? That’s right: there’s only two copies left. Bag one from the shop or email hello@steamypress.co.uk to reserve a copy.

18 Jan 2013 / 8 notes

It’s the one you’ve all been waiting for.

Like a walk from the suburbs to the centre of the city, Stephanie Mill’s debut photo-zine grows and changes on each stage of the journey. On the outskirts life is quiet, free time spent hanging with buds, drinking brews and DIY tattoos. But as the youths grab their backpacks and head inland, the scene soon changes: walls dripping with fresh graffiti, skate spots galore and a gutsy nightlife. The action ascends, evenings explode and we’re met with a crescendo between moments and breaths. The final conclusion: everything sucks. Or does it?

Stephanie Mill is a 21-year-old photographer from the suburbs of Toronto. Moving to the centre of town to pursue an BFA in Photography at OCAD, she has been widely published for her open and honest style. Everything Sucks is her first solo publication.

A5
Colour
Saddle-stitched
48 pp. 

SOLD OUT

(Source: steamypress.co.uk)

17 Jan 2013 / 49 notes

It’s a matter of days before this lands in your hands.
Follow Steamy Press on Facebook and get it fresh off the press.

It’s a matter of days before this lands in your hands.

Follow Steamy Press on Facebook and get it fresh off the press.

15 Jan 2013 / 8 notes