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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - "Ch'io mi scordi di te" (Teresa Berganza)

LindoroRossiniLindoroRossini·680 videos
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Uploaded on Jun 29, 2008

Out of all Mozart's concert arias, "Ch'io mi scordi di te" certainly occupies a special place. It is generally considered to have been composed by Mozart for Nancy Storace (the first Idamante and Susanna) when she left Vienna and, coincidentally, Mozart; basically, the aria is something of a farewell. It isn't known exactly if there was something between them but the aria certainly is unusual. Some actually call it a "duet" because of the promenance of the piano obbligato. What interesting, Mozart played the piano part at Storace's final concert... Many researchers even single out certain phrases within the text as proof of love between the composer and the singer, though these are only suggestions. Still, a perfect scene with a most brilliant, loving and longing allegretto section.

Here I would like to provide a more musical overview of the aria made by "allmusic.com": "The beginning Andante segment is actually in ternary form and is introduced by the orchestra. The central, contrasting section begins at "Tu sospiri?" and modulates to the dominant. After the return of the soprano's opening lines, Mozart prepares for the shift to the faster, second part of the aria in an unusual and imaginative way. Virtually unaccompanied outbursts from the soprano ("sempre il cuorsaria," "Stella barbare," and "stella spietate!") alternate with rapid flourishes on the piano, creating an atmosphere of expectancy that allows for the most startling change in rhythm. The ensuing Allegretto is a serial rondo (ABACADA Coda). In the coda, Mozart produces the opposite of the effect he achieved in the transition when sixteenth-note scale passages in the soprano slow to eighth and then to half notes".

Choosing one version out of dozens of renditions is certainly a difficult task, though in my case the choice process was already ruined by the fact that I already have a favorite version of this aria which I'm posting: Teresa Berganza. I'm not going to spoil anything, just listen, I do hope that you'll like it as much as I do :).

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Uploader Comments (LindoroRossini)

  • bcnjd

    who is the pianist??

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  • LindoroRossini

    Geoffrey Parsons.

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    in reply to bcnjd (Show the comment)

Top Comments

  • William Robinson

    wow, pure gold. I forget how magical Mozart can be, except when I hear such perfect performances as this. Thank you for posting!

    · 5

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  • wanzenettl

    While Nancy Storace WAS Mozart's original Susanna in Figaro, she was NOT the original Idamante. And the aria was not "something of a farewell", it WAS a farewell. In fact, Mozart composed it as a farewell gift for her to sing at her farewell concert in Vienna in 1787.

    · 4

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Video Responses

This video is a response to Ch'io mi scordi di te? KV 505 Diana Damrau

All Comments (11)

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  • Poudre d'Escampette

    The most tender love and farewell aria, obviously one of the best performance.

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  • dialectgirl

    Beautiful!

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  • primohomme

    Fabulous! I have this album and love it.

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  • vstasov

    Thank you for posting. Beautiful.

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  • mehertoorkey

    This is a superb recording:lovely singing, fine piano playing and which orchestra is it?Keep posting these gems. Thank you.

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  • Lohengrin

    indeed this is extremely special Berganza sings here very close to what we could call perfection for this particular aria It is truly fantastic

    · 3

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  • BravaBerganza01

    ...and btw last 43 seconds of this recording is my mobile ringing :) :) I adore Teresa Berganza!!! <3 <3 <3

    · 2

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