What economic recovery? Only one in 50 people believe things are better for them - and just a fifth think 2014 spells good news

By Belinda Robinson

|

Only one in 50 voters believe that that they have benefited from the economic recovery so far, according to a poll. 

Meanwhile, families battling with the cost of living do not think that things will improve in the New Year, with a TUC survey claiming just 20 per cent think 2014 will deliver a recovery for their finances.

The TUC survey looked at how people felt about the recent claims by Chancellor George Osbourne that ‘Britain’s economic plan was working.’  Out of 1,600 people polled many saw recent austerity measures as necessary but more than half wanted services that had been cut to be restored, although a third wanted them retained.

Stressed out: People are not convinced that things are getting better

Stressed out: People are not convinced that things are getting better

The news will come as a blow to the Government which has been busy assuring voters that as the economy improves in 2013 and 2014 it will slowly be felt by everyone.

According to the survey, only one in five said they expected the gains of an economic recovery to be fairly shared across society.

TUC general secretary, Frances O'Grady said: ‘Our new poll is bad news for the Government. Voters do not expect to benefit from the recovery next year, do not expect their wages to keep up with living costs and do not trust the Government to spread the benefits of recovery fairly.

 

‘Above all they do not share the Chancellor's ambition to permanently shrink the state. By more than two to one they want to see services restored when the economy grows, not permanently cut.'

She added: ‘Voters accepted austerity as unpleasant medicine. But now they are realising that what they thought were the unpleasant side effects are what the Chancellor sees as a cure. Recovery seems to mean food banks, zero hours and pay cuts for the many, tax cuts and pay growth for the few at the top.’

Voters do not share the Chancellor's ambition to permanently shrink the state, they want to see services restored when the economy grows

Voters do not share the Chancellor's ambition to permanently shrink the state, they want to see services restored when the economy grows

‘Do we want to go back to a business as usual version of the pre-crash economy, based on housing bubbles, an over mighty finance sector and increasing inequality as a growing proportion of the workforce fail to share in prosperity?

‘Or do we want to build a new, genuinely rebalanced economy that through investment, growth and active government aims for a high-skill, high-pay, high-productivity economy that shares out prosperity to all? I know which side unions are on,’ O'Grady added.

However, as the Government struggles to convince voters its plan is working, Labour leader Ed Miliband said his party has a ‘credible and affordable’ plan to help families cut childcare costs and energy bills.

During his traditional New Year message Miliband said Labour's plan to freeze energy bills for 20 months from June 2015, offer more options for childcare and even crack down on payday lenders would ‘tip the balance towards hope’ for families who cannot make ends meet.

Miliband said: ‘The Tories want to change the conversation from the cost-of-living crisis. They will talk about anything else. Inherent in their vision is not a solution to the crisis but a problem.

‘People do not want the earth. They would prefer some very specific promises, specific things about what a Government will do,’ the Labour leader added.

In response, the Government said Labour’s plan will prompt more debt and borrowing and added that the party was in denial about the size of the deficit it left for them to inherit in 2010.

The comments below have not been moderated.

Is that because 1 person in 50 is a bankster?

1
2
Click to rate

So according to the Labour funding TUC survey, "Tories bad, Labour good?" Now there's a surprise. Pointless article.

1
1
Click to rate

This poll was conducted by YouGov and NOT the TUC. Are we allowed to call Osbourne a buffoon and his policies those of a poisoned chalice? 49 out of 50 people are not sharing in this 'recovery'.

1
2
Click to rate

This is a poll by YouGov not the TUC. Is one allowed to call Osbourne a buffoon and his policies the poisoned chalice that he's handed to 49 out of 50 people of this country? What recovery?

1
2
Click to rate

With manufacturing still at 2006 levels?

0
4
Click to rate

I am one of the minority who has managed to achieve annual wage rises of 2%. However it is PAINFULLY OBVIOUS to me that my clients, friends and neighbours are all suffering from a prolonged falling-income crisis which will simply go on and on. There IS no end in sight for the majority of the population and most people are utterly resigned to it. BUT the children of these respectable and hardworking families

0
6
Click to rate

.......will not put up with this obscene disparity between those who have and those who don't

1
5
Click to rate

All right then,give Labour another chance and then see what happens. Well you all know what happens. Disaster

5
7
Click to rate

Nobody could make it worse than this disater of a government has made it...

1
3
Click to rate

Yes because a TUC survey has no bias against a Conservative government....

6
7
Click to rate

That is because things are not getting better for 49 out of ever 50 people they have got worse. Now the 1 in 50 who are better off Dave and George know they all by name and title.

2
29
Click to rate

A typical proof that the coalition is absolutely out of touch with people amd reality.Hoe can any one expect any satisfaction , when the salaries paid to people do not keep up with the rise in inflation.Also,trying to portray by statistics that part time jobs as equivalent to real full time employment ,may be alright as a temporary political gimmick . But such cheap tricks may not last long , without being discovered.

2
22
Click to rate

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

By posting your comment you agree to our house rules.

Who is this week's top commenter? Find out now