Talk:Māori people

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject New Zealand / Māori  (Rated B-class, Top-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject New Zealand, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of New Zealand and New Zealand-related topics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Top  This article has been rated as Top-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Māori task force (marked as Top-importance).
 
WikiProject Polynesia (Rated B-class, Top-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Polynesia, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Polynesia on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Top  This article has been rated as Top-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Ethnic groups (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Ethnic groups, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of articles relating to ethnic groups, nationalities, and other cultural identities on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
edit·history·watch·refresh Stock post message.svg To-do list for Māori people:

Sections to be referenced and copy-edited

  • 1 Etymology
  • 2 Naming and self-naming
  • 3 History
    • 3.1 Origins
    • 3.2 Archaic period (1280-1500)
    • 3.3 Classic period (1500-1642)
    • 3.4 Early European contact (1642-1840)
    • 3.5 British Treaty with the people of New Zealand
    • 3.6 Decline and revival
    • 3.7 Recent history
  • 4 Culture
    • 4.1 Traditional culture
    • 4.2 Belief and religion
    • 4.3 Performing arts
    • 4.4 Literature and media
    • 4.5 Sport
  • 5 Language
  • 6 Society
    • 6.1 Historical development
      • 6.1.1 20th century
    • 6.2 Marae, hapū and iwi
    • 6.3 Population
    • 6.4 Socioeconomic challenges
    • 6.5 Race relations
  • 7 Commerce
  • 8 Political representation

Other elements to fix

  • Lead
  • Check/format/add images

References

  • King, Michael (2003). The Penguin history of New Zealand. Auckland, N.Z.: Penguin Books. ISBN 978-0-14-301867-4. 
  • Ryan, Greg (1993). Forerunners of the All Blacks : the 1888-89 New Zealand Native Football Team in Britain, Australia and New Zealand. Christchurch, N.Z.: Canterbury University Press. ISBN 0-908812-30-2. 
  • Mulholland, Malcolm (2008). Beneath the Mā̄ori moon : an illustrated history of Māori rugby. Wellington, N.Z.: Huia. ISBN 978-1-86969-305-3. 

Adding References and new Material[edit]

I would like to add references for the various "citation needed"inserts in the Decline and Revival section but am unable to do so-most of this is from Michael King . It appears that growth of this article has ground to a halt. I note there is very little in the article from Judith Binney's writings. She is one orthodox NZ historian who has a great understanding of many aspects of Maoritanga- many of which are not covered in the article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 122.62.226.243 (talk) 21:48, 11 April 2013 (UTC)

Edit request on 17 May 2013[edit]

"175 for males and 161 for females."

Should read "175cm for males and 161cm for females." or somthing similar. 162.119.64.110 (talk) 22:34, 17 May 2013 (UTC)

YesY Done-gadfium 05:29, 18 May 2013 (UTC)

removing POV tag with no active discussion per Template:POV[edit]

I've removed an old neutrality tag from this page that appears to have no active discussion per the instructions at Template:POV:

This template is not meant to be a permanent resident on any article. Remove this template whenever:
  1. There is consensus on the talkpage or the NPOV Noticeboard that the issue has been resolved
  2. It is not clear what the neutrality issue is, and no satisfactory explanation has been given
  3. In the absence of any discussion, or if the discussion has become dormant.

Since there's no evidence of ongoing discussion, I'm removing the tag for now. If discussion is continuing and I've failed to see it, however, please feel free to restore the template and continue to address the issues. Thanks to everybody working on this one! -- Khazar2 (talk) 14:43, 2 July 2013 (UTC)

Suggested editing of Decile and Revival[edit]

Re "Citation Needed" in this section. The Information about Te Puea all comes from Te Puea :A life. Michael King. Penguin NZ. 1977. The information re Maori soldiers in WW1 comes from James Cowan's 1926 book, The Maoris(sic) in the Great War. There are a number of errors in the current wiki text. Originally the Maori unit had not been trained or picked as an infantry unit. It was rushed into this roll with some brief extra training after the high casualty rates during the initial battles at Gallipoli. During an attack 3 Maori officers were seen to act poorly and were arrested, charged and dismissed. They were sent back to NZ for unsatisfactory performance according to NZ History Online ."Pioneer Battlation",despite arguments put forward by other officers to retain them. After this incident they no longer served as infantry but were made into a pioneers-initially spread around other NZ units but later in the war reunited as a pioneer battalion. Pioneers acted as labourers and construction workers mainly digging trenches in the Western Front and took no direct part in the fighting, although it was still dangerous work. Just after the end of the war there was a very nasty incident at Etables, a huge rest camp on the French coast, when a group of Maori soldiers went berserk. A Pakeha officer attempted to take a rifle off a soldier and was shot and killed. It is not known what caused the incident. Probably severe post traumatic stress . Cowan's book gives the number of Maori from each iwi. Ngati Porou and Arawa had large numbers of soldiers as did Ngapuhi. Surprisingly, since they were originally part of the Kingitanga, Ngati Maniapoto also had large numbers-enough to form most of a company in 1917. Very large numbers of Pacific Islander also volunteered to fight-the total was about 500 by the end of the war. Cook Islanders were prominent and were placed with the large Maniapoto contingent in 1917-18. According to Cowan, even though Waikato-mainly due to Te Puea's influence- had a ban on joining up, a few Waikato were present at the Western Front. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 122.62.226.243 (talk) 22:26, 19 August 2013 (UTC)

Cannibalism[edit]

Why in the entire article is there no mention of Maori cannibalism, or even the eating of dogs? Has it been sanitised for the easily offended? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 60.234.125.16 (talk) 12:50, 9 January 2014 (UTC)

Cannibalism is mentioned three times in the historical section, and the article is also in Category:Tribal societies that have practiced cannibalism. It's also mentioned in the Māori culture article. I suggest the most appropriate place to mention the eating of dogs would be in the latter article, at Maori culture#Food. You are most welcome to add something there, and please include a reference.-gadfium 19:43, 9 January 2014 (UTC)
There is also a section on Maori cuisine in the article on New Zealand cuisine, so items of the cuisine can be added there. Dimadick (talk) 16:51, 12 January 2014 (UTC)

There is no doubt that for the early missionaries the discovery of the practice of eating people was extremely upsetting. They made it very clear to Maori that to the CMS cannibalism was totally unacceptable under any circumstances. Williams wrote often about this horror and personally went to great length to stamp it out -even going along with a war party in an attempt to intervene. A very brave and determined man! He realised of course that missionaries had a special privileged position in the minds of Maori chiefs so the direct threat to the missionaries was perhaps not so great.Maori on the other hand saw it as normal part of Maori culture -at times an everyday event which they introduced their children to at a young age.

It was tika-the normal acceptable thing to do in Maori culture. Most of what was written at the time about NZ (probably 90%) comes from missionaries and the rest from various visiting luminaries(invaribly christian) -sea captains ,adventurers, scientists etc but virtually nothing from Maori who in 1840 made up about 98% of the population. Strangely there is very little written about why Maori were cannibals. Certainly there was a severe shortage of land based mammals to hunt and eat but Maori seemed to thrive on a varied diet with a heavy focus on seafood.It is notable that the period of peak cannibalism coincides with the Musket Wars(1805-1843) when the various tribes and sub tribes tried to eliminate each other in battle and then by killing and eating survivors.

P. Moon probably has the most thorough study of Maori cannibalism that is easily accessible. He was roundly attacked in public through the media by one Maori academic extremist who adopted the notion that it was offensive to Maori to raise the subject as it made Maori look bad. There is a common line of thinking amongst some Maori that only Maori should write about Maori history or culture. Even Michael King, in his later years, considered this important that "Maori tell their own stories" and he regretted that very few Maori picked up the baton. It is quite common amongst Maori to object to Maori from other tribes telling stories (history /myths)that concern other tribes.Claudia