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MARIA KONNIKOVA

Maria Konnikova is a contributing writer for The New Yorker Web site, newyorker.com, where she writes a weekly blog focussing on psychology and science. She is the author of the Times best-seller “Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes,” which has been nominated for an Agatha Award for Best Nonfiction. Her book on the psychology of the con, “The Confidence Game,” will be published by Viking in 2015. She has also worked as a producer for “Charlie Rose” and has contributed numerous articles and essays to the Times, TheAtlantic.com, Scientific American MIND, and NewRepublic.com, among other publications.

 

 

Results 1 - 10 of 36
July 3, 2014

Did Facebook Hurt People’s Feelings?

Can Facebook change the way that researchers study human subjects?
June 25, 2014

How “Frozen” Took Over the World

Why did Disney’s atypical, boundary-pushing animated film about princesses succeed? Psychologists have been wondering, too.
June 19, 2014

Don’t Worry, Be Happy

For decades, psychologists have asked: Does a positive outlook lead to false hope or to a better life?
June 11, 2014

Lean Out: The Dangers for Women Who Negotiate

Contrary to the advice of “Lean In,” for women, asserting a strong position in negotiations can backfire.
May 28, 2014

Where Do Eureka Moments Come From?

Sometimes the search for creative insight requires us to focus, and sometimes it requires us to look away.
May 19, 2014

I Don’t Want to Be Right

To change false beliefs, appealing to a person’s sense of self may be more important than the facts.
May 7, 2014

Multitask Masters

There is generally an inverse relationship between how good people are at multitasking and how good they think they are.
May 1, 2014

I Want You To Know That I’m Tyrion Lannister

Online quizzes are popular for the same reason that astrology is.
April 23, 2014

How to Tell When Someone Is Lying

Over time, the psychologist Paul Ekman has found that one particular characteristic can prove useful in detecting liars.
April 15, 2014

The Surprising Science of Yawning

Yawning may be the opposite of what we think—not a signal of sleepiness but a signal that it’s time to act.
Results: 1 - 10 of 36
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