500 children suffering from tooth decay are hospitalised every WEEK as sugary drinks and fruit juice take their toll 

  • Researchers found that more than 25,000 children needed teeth extracted
  • Some children had all 20 of their milk teeth removed because of decay 
  • More than half of children in Leicester are suffering from tooth decay 
  • Bad oral health linked to deprivation with a sharp north/south divide

By Darren Boyle

Almost 500 children are being hospitalised each week to have teeth removed new figures have revealed. 

It is estimated that one in four primary school children are suffering tooth decay as a result of drinking too much fruit juice or soft drinks. 

The research by the Health and Social Care Information Centre for NHS England found the level of admissions had increased over the past 12 months. 

Almost 500 children a week require surgery to remove rotten teeth according to new research, file picture

Almost 500 children a week require surgery to remove rotten teeth according to new research, file picture

In 2010/11, 22,752 were hospitalised in order to have one or more teeth removed. That figure increased to to 25,812. 

In some extreme cases, dental surgeons were forced to remove all of  their milk teeth because of excessive decay.   

Kathryn Harley, consultant in paediatric dentistry at the Royal College told The Sunday Times: 'We have children who require all 20 of their baby teeth extracted. 

'It beggars belief that their diets could produce such a drastic effect.

'They are going into hospital because they are either presenting with acute problems with pain, or because the stage of dental disease, the number of teeth with decay, is such that they need a general anaesthetic. 

A major survey of five-year-old children discovered that more than a quarter were suffering from tooth decay. 

The high level of extractions is being blamed on children consuming too many sweets and soft drinks

The high level of extractions is being blamed on children consuming too many sweets and soft drinks

According to the survey: 'The results reveal wide variation in the prevalence and severity of dental decay. The areas with poorer oral health tend to be in the north and in the more deprived local authority.'

The figures show that more than half of children in Leicester, 53 per cent, compared with just 12.5 per cent in Brighton and Hove. 

Children in Rochdale have on average five decayed teeth compared with 1.88 in South Gloucestershire. 

More than eight per cent of children aged five in Blackpool have been hospitalised at least once to have a tooth removed. 

The researchers claimed: 'This report highlights the wide variation in the levels of dental decay experienced by five-year-old children living in different parts of the country and in different life circumstances. 

'The cause of dental decay is well understood and is related to the frequent exposure of teeth to fermentable carbohydrates.  

Provisional figures for the the period 2013-14 show that 25,812 children aged between five and nine have been admitted to hospital to have multiple tooth extractions, up from 22,574 three years previously. 

Some dentists observe how decay progresses in baby teeth because there is uncertainty about the effectiveness of fillings, said Professor Jimmy Steele of Newcastle University.

'A lot of dentists are unhappy about taking out teeth generally. They certainly don't like to take kids' teeth out.'

We have children who require all 20 of their baby teeth extracted. It beggars belief that their diets could produce such a drastic effect. 
Paediatric dentist Kathryn Harley 

The number of children aged from zero to four admitted to hospital to have teeth out has also increased, from 8,060 in 2010-11 to a provisional figure of 8,758 in 2013-2014.

Other key findings for children being hospitalised show that one in 20 of girls aged from 15 to 19 being treated by a consultant was as a result of intentional self-harm, while boys were more likely than girls to have been injured in an assault, two per cent. .

Similar differences were also apparent for 10 to 14-year-olds, but they were more pronounced for the older age group. There were more similarities in children up to the age of nine.

There were a total of 2.5 million Finished Consultant Episodes (FCEs) in the 12 month period from July 2012 to June last year for children aged up to 19, a very small increase of 0.1 per cent on the previous 12 months.

 

The comments below have not been moderated.

If the lazy idol parents took the time to check that the kids brushed their teeth this would not be happening. Make the parents pay full price for the Dentistry for their kids they may think twice about being idol, lazy parents. Oops i forgot most are benefits and are to busy to care

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Not only fruit juices and sugary drinks, but also sugary yoghurts and cakes. None of these have any place in a child's diet, let alone their lunch box. They should be banned outright.

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Why are so many parents in this country so uneducated in this?? It's flabbergasting it really is

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Fruit juices are acidic and cause holes in teeth. My very 'superior' sister in law sneered at my - sometimes - squash drinking children and gave her child 'juice'. Her child had its first filling at the age of three. Mine are now in their thirties and have no fillings.

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I had the same sneering from my sister - neither of my children have fillings ... hers have!

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Poor parenting. Pure and simple.

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This is down to bad parenting. Nothing else. If the parent could be bothered to brush their child's teeth twice a day. It's the underclass , lazy bone idle benefit scroungers that are the worse culprits. Plus they have more time on their hands to do it , they just can't be bothered.

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Do people think children with rotten teeth drink fruit juices? No, they eat crap, and drink fizzy drinks! When I was a kid I never had one cavity, and I was in care as a kid, we had to brush our teeth morning and night and visited the local dentist all the time. We were only allowed to eat sweets one day a week on a Saturday when we got our pocket money, but then the shops weren't close by and the availability of sweets was sparsh. Came out of that regular teeth brushing routine, ate more sweets, but it was when I started dabbling in fizzy drinks as a teenager did I start having trouble with my far back teeth. Since adopting a part fruitrian and fully vegan lifestyle, all the toothaches I was experiencing has gone completely. Even flossing today is a totally different experience from when I use to eat meat and stuff. Fully rippen fruit will never be bad for us (remember blood supply to teeth needs good vitamins and minerals too), it is the junk and fizzy drinks.

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It's not sugary drinks and fruit juice, or sweets, or biscuits that is destroying these children's teeth; because I had all of those as a child and never had a rotten baby tooth. It's having TOO MUCH of those things, because of bad parenting, which is destroying these children's teeth. I imagine the rarity of visits to the dentist is contributing too. I'll never forget walking home from the dentist's with my Mum and my older brother and us both begging her to buy us a drink or some sweets from the cornershop on the way home. Absolutely no chance. There was no way we were going to be destroying our teeth, especially straight after going to the dentist. I wonder how many children these days are only coaxed into visiting the dentist on the promise that they'll get lots of sugary treats when they get home?

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sugar sugar sugar plain and simple

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Sadly, you will alway have parents who cannot understand that allowing their child to have a constant stream of sugary drinks, foods, etc is harmful to their teeth and health generally. Teeth can handle three sugar attacks a day "breakfast, lunch and dinner" anything else in between these meals should be plain water or savoury snack like cheese or carrot sticks. Save the chocolate/cake/ sweeties etc for an after dinner treat. Additionally I have visited rural America and the state of people's teeth was as bad as anything you find in the UK!

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