Skip to main content
  1. News
  2. Politics
  3. Nonpartisan

Ending unlawful US wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran: Gandhi + MLK + prosecution ends US fascism


   We hold these Truths as self-evident...

The emperor has no clothes. The US wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are unlawful; obvious when anyone takes less than one hour to understand applicable law. Rhetoric for war with Iran is also “emperor has no clothes” obvious lies (here for audio interview). America has fallen into fascism; a collusion among corporate interests for war graft, banksters taking trillions from taxpayers supervised by political pimps, and psychopaths who love torture and the pain of war. Corporate media lies to us to keep these crimes hidden as best that propaganda can try to conceal the bright light of truth.

The obvious policy response from the public and those working in the US military, government, and law enforcement is what Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr. concluded: non-cooperation. Those of us with an oath to protect and defend the US Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic, upon reflection of the evidence of unlawful wars, if we are to honor our oath must refuse and end unlawful orders. Individuals have various legal authority to act; ranging from simple refusal to arrest and prosecution for clearly criminal acts.
 
Because the breadth and depth of criminal activity facilitated by political “leadership” and corporate media is unpractical to prosecute, I recommend a Truth and Reconciliation process to exchange the full truth and return of public assets for non-prosecution. Those who refuse this offer will be prosecuted after a window of opportunity closes.
 
Let’s briefly consider Gandhi and King’s approaches to similar fights for freedom.
 
Gandhi eloquently began with his commitment to state the obvious that British interest in colonialism wasn’t Christian values of helping new friends, but unlawful exploitation. His naïve beginner’s view of “misunderstanding” would evolve to simply stating British imperialism was evil:
 
"One thing we have endeavoured to observe most scrupulously, namely, never to depart from the strictest facts and, in dealing with the difficult questions that have arisen during the year, we hope that we have used the utmost moderation possible under the circumstances. Our duty is very simple and plain. We want to serve the community, and in our own humble way to serve the Empire. We believe in the righteousness of the cause, which it is our privilege to espouse. We have an abiding faith in the mercy of the Almighty God, and we have firm faith in the British Constitution. That being so, we should fail in our duty if we wrote anything with a view to hurt. Facts we would always place before our readers, whether they are palatable or not, and it is by placing them constantly before the public in their nakedness that the misunderstanding between the two communities in South Africa can be removed."    Mohandas K. Gandhi,  Indian Opinion (1 October 1903)
 
For Gandhi’s evolved view of British evil in 1922, read this passage from Freedom’s Battle.
 
Gandhi concluded the effective response from the public was non-violent, non-cooperation with unjust British rule until the British themselves realized their engagement in immoral acts with an educated and non-cooperative public was inconsistent with their own values.
 
Martin Luther King, Jr. learned from Gandhi for the Civil Rights movement to realize the 14th Amendment to the US Constitution in daily life. This evolved to King working to end the Vietnam War; a struggle that civil law ruled the US government participated to assassinate him. The King family prints this verdict on their website. King's attorney, William Pepper, wrote An Act of State: the Execution of Martin Luther King, a book covering the evidence and trial. This was the only legal case; no criminal case went to court as the accused stated he was lied to from a state-appointed public defender to plead guilty. His appeal for a trial was subsequently denied.
 
In his speech, “Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence,” King addresses similar evil of our current wars. The entire speech is brilliant; I’ll reprint 14 paragraphs. I strongly recommend investing the time to consider the insight of one of humanity’s greatest speakers on a strongly similar war:
 
"A time comes when silence is betrayal." That time has come for us in relation to Vietnam.
 
The truth of these words is beyond doubt but the mission to which they call us is a most difficult one. Even when pressed by the demands of inner truth, men do not easily assume the task of opposing their government's policy, especially in time of war. Nor does the human spirit move without great difficulty against all the apathy of conformist thought within one's own bosom and in the surrounding world. Moreover when the issues at hand seem as perplexed as they often do in the case of this dreadful conflict we are always on the verge of being mesmerized by uncertainty; but we must move on….
 
The only change came from America as we increased our troop commitments in support of governments which were singularly corrupt, inept and without popular support. All the while the people read our leaflets and received regular promises of peace and democracy -- and land reform. Now they languish under our bombs and consider us -- not their fellow Vietnamese --the real enemy. They move sadly and apathetically as we herd them off the land of their fathers into concentration camps where minimal social needs are rarely met. They know they must move or be destroyed by our bombs. So they go -- primarily women and children and the aged.
 
They watch as we poison their water, as we kill a million acres of their crops. They must weep as the bulldozers roar through their areas preparing to destroy the precious trees. They wander into the hospitals, with at least twenty casualties from American firepower for one "Vietcong"-inflicted injury. So far we may have killed a million of them -- mostly children. They wander into the towns and see thousands of the children, homeless, without clothes, running in packs on the streets like animals. They see the children, degraded by our soldiers as they beg for food. They see the children selling their sisters to our soldiers, soliciting for their mothers.
 
What do the peasants think as we ally ourselves with the landlords and as we refuse to put any action into our many words concerning land reform? What do they think as we test our latest weapons on them, just as the Germans tested out new medicine and new tortures in the concentration camps of Europe? Where are the roots of the independent Vietnam we claim to be building? Is it among these voiceless ones? …What liberators?
 
I am as deeply concerned about our troops there as anything else. For it occurs to me that what we are submitting them to in Vietnam is not simply the brutalizing process that goes on in any war where armies face each other and seek to destroy. We are adding cynicism to the process of death, for they must know after a short period there that none of the things we claim to be fighting for are really involved. Before long they must know that their government has sent them into a struggle among Vietnamese, and the more sophisticated surely realize that we are on the side of the wealthy and the secure while we create hell for the poor.
 
Somehow this madness must cease. We must stop now. I speak as a child of God and brother to the suffering poor of Vietnam. I speak for those whose land is being laid waste, whose homes are being destroyed, whose culture is being subverted. I speak for the poor of America who are paying the double price of smashed hopes at home and death and corruption in Vietnam. I speak as a citizen of the world, for the world as it stands aghast at the path we have taken. I speak as an American to the leaders of my own nation. The great initiative in this war is ours. The initiative to stop it must be ours. …
 
As we counsel young men concerning military service we must clarify for them our nation's role in Vietnam and challenge them with the alternative of conscientious objection. I am pleased to say that this is the path now being chosen by more than seventy students at my own alma mater, Morehouse College, and I recommend it to all who find the American course in Vietnam a dishonorable and unjust one. Moreover I would encourage all ministers of draft age to give up their ministerial exemptions and seek status as conscientious objectors. These are the times for real choices and not false ones. We are at the moment when our lives must be placed on the line if our nation is to survive its own folly. Every man of humane convictions must decide on the protest that best suits his convictions, but we must all protest….
 
I am convinced that if we are to get on the right side of the world revolution, we as a nation must undergo a radical revolution of values. We must rapidly begin the shift from a "thing-oriented" society to a "person-oriented" society. When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, materialism, and militarism are incapable of being conquered.
 
A true revolution of values will soon cause us to question the fairness and justice of many of our past and present policies. n the one hand we are called to play the good Samaritan on life's roadside; but that will be only an initial act. One day we must come to see that the whole Jericho road must be transformed so that men and women will not be constantly beaten and robbed as they make their journey on life's highway. True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it is not haphazard and superficial. It comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring. A true revolution of values will soon look uneasily on the glaring contrast of poverty and wealth. With righteous indignation, it will look across the seas and see individual capitalists of the West investing huge sums of money in Asia, Africa and South America, only to take the profits out with no concern for the social betterment of the countries, and say: "This is not just." It will look at our alliance with the landed gentry of Latin America and say: "This is not just." The Western arrogance of feeling that it has everything to teach others and nothing to learn from them is not just. A true revolution of values will lay hands on the world order and say of war: "This way of settling differences is not just." This business of burning human beings with napalm, of filling our nation's homes with orphans and widows, of injecting poisonous drugs of hate into veins of people normally humane, of sending men home from dark and bloody battlefields physically handicapped and psychologically deranged, cannot be reconciled with wisdom, justice and love. A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death.
 
America, the richest and most powerful nation in the world, can well lead the way in this revolution of values. There is nothing, except a tragic death wish, to prevent us from reordering our priorities, so that the pursuit of peace will take precedence over the pursuit of war. There is nothing to keep us from molding a recalcitrant status quo with bruised hands until we have fashioned it into a brotherhood. …
 
We can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. The oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. History is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. As Arnold Toynbee says : "Love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. Therefore the first hope in our inventory must be the hope that love is going to have the last word."
 
We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history there is such a thing as being too late.
 
Procrastination is still the thief of time. Life often leaves us standing bare, naked and dejected with a lost opportunity. The "tide in the affairs of men" does not remain at the flood; it ebbs. We may cry out deperately for time to pause in her passage, but time is deaf to every plea and rushes on. Over the bleached bones and jumbled residue of numerous civilizations are written the pathetic words: "Too late." There is an invisible book of life that faithfully records our vigilance or our neglect. "The moving finger writes, and having writ moves on..." We still have a choice today; nonviolent coexistence or violent co-annihilation.
 
We must move past indecision to action. We must find new ways to speak for peace in Vietnam and justice throughout the developing world -- a world that borders on our doors. If we do not act we shall surely be dragged down the long dark and shameful corridors of time reserved for those who possess power without compassion, might without morality, and strength without sight.”
 
For my own reflection of how Christians should respond to calls for war, click here. I also include a 6-minute video, The Uprising, from PuppetGov.com. The video includes clips of Gandhi and King.
 
Please share this article with all who can benefit. If you appreciate my work, subscribe by clicking under the article title (it’s free). Please peruse my archive of work to help build a brighter future.
 

Comments

  • yeah right 4 years ago

    Non Partisan Examiner???? yeah Right!

  • Carl Herman (LA County Nonpartisan Examiner) 4 years ago

    yeah right: an intelligent response based on the documented facts of unlawful wars is too much for you?

  • Dylan 4 years ago

    Outside the US these wars are known for what they are; unlawful attrocities. Don't think this makes any difference though - the US is too big a trading partner for it to actually amke any difference. You are completely correct Carl - a few minutes taking the time to understand the facts makes this completely self evident. I think the shame it that this few minutes is too much for so many people.

  • nick adam 4 years ago

    The news that a tribe gaining upper hand against Talibans defies logic and past history of Afghanistan.Even if we accept,for the sake of argument, that such a tribe exists,what is the guarantee that neo-Talibans won't emerge once this tribe eliminates Talibans?Talibans had full support of US empire,theocratic Saudi Arabia and Pakistan against Soviets.Hizb-e-Islami,a radical Muslim group led by Gulbuddin Hikmatyar,a secretive,highly centralized political organization with cadres mainly drawn from educated urban youths,had barely any base,like other Islamist,built a powerful clout with money and arms from CIA via Pakistan.

    Ensuring ouster of one radical group and replace it with equally dreadful group may be of temporary relief,but in the long run chances of turning a blue-eyed boy into most wanted terrorist can not be ruled out.

  • Carl Herman (LA County Nonpartisan Examiner) 4 years ago

    Nick:
    The US is engaged in unlawful wars and therefore all Americans involved in those wars with blue eyes are the terrorists. Those with brown eyes in Afghanistan and Iraq are lawfully defending their nations from invasion.

    Place your comment in that context or refute that conclusion of existing American blue-eyed terrorists by explaining war laws and the facts, otherwise your rational first point is overshadowed by your siding with the real terrorists.

Advertisement