Entering the Lists

This is a scorecard of the effectiveness of Sad Puppies and Rabid Puppies slates. It is purely binary — did the item make the final ballot or not — because official eligibility rulings and nominee withdrawals are not available at the moment I am writing.

SAD PUPPIES 3: the 2015 Hugo slate

  • Recommended 60 nominees; 51 made the final ballot and 9 did not.

RABID PUPPIES 2015

  • Recommended 67 nominees; 58 made the final ballot and 9 did not.

COMBINED SCORECARD

  • A total of 61 nominees from both slates made the final ballot.
  • This consists of 48 items recommended by both lists; 3 items only on Sad Puppies; and 10 only on Rabid Puppies.
  • Failing to make the final ballot were 4 items recommended on both lists, 5 items recommended only by Sad Puppies 3, plus 5 items that only appeared on Rabid Puppies.

NOT APPEARING ON EITHER LIST

  • 24 final ballot nominees did not come from either list.

Comparative lists follow the jump.

Update 04/20/2015: This list has been fully updated to reflect withdrawals and items ruled ineligible in the post Re-Entering The Lists.

Update 04/06/2015: Made a correction to the Combined Scorecard. I had accidentally undercounted some items that failed to make the final ballot which had been recomended only by Sad Puppies 3, even though they were marked on my checksheet.

NOMINEES APPEARING ON BOTH SAD PUPPIES 3 AND RABID PUPPIES

BEST NOVEL

  • Skin Game by Jim Butcher, ROC
  • Lines of Departure, by Marko Kloos, self-published
  • The Dark Between the Stars by Kevin J. Anderson, Tor Books

BEST NOVELLA

  • “One Bright Star to Guide Them” by John C. Wright, Castalia House (Spanish)
  • “Big Boys Don’t Cry” by Tom Kratman, Castalia House (German, Italian)
  • “Flow” by Arlan Andrews Sr., Analog November 2014

BEST NOVELETTE

  • “The Journeyman: In the Stone House” by Michael F. Flynn, Analog June 2014
  • “Championship B’tok” by Edward M. Lerner, Analog Sept 2014
  •  “The Triple Sun: A Golden Age Tale”, by Rajnar Vajra, Analog July/Aug 2014
  •  “Ashes to Ashes, Dust to Dust, Earth to Alluvium” by Gray Rinehart, Orson Scott Card’s InterGalactic Medicine Show

BEST SHORT STORY

  • “Goodnight Stars” by Annie Bellet, The Apocalypse Triptych
  •  “Totaled” by Kary English, Galaxy’s Edge
  • “On A Spiritual Plain”, Lou Antonelli, Sci Phi Journal #2

BEST RELATED WORK

  • Transhuman and Subhuman: Essays on Science Fiction and Awful Truth, by John C. Wright, Castalia House
  •  “The Hot Equations: Thermodynamics and Military SF” by Ken Burnside, Riding the Red Horse / Castalia House
  •  “Wisdom From My Internet” by Michael Z. Williamson, self-published
  •  “The Science is Never Settled” by Tedd Roberts, Baen Free Library
  •  “Letters from Gardner” by Lou Antonelli, Sci Phi Journal #3

BEST GRAPHIC STORY

  • Reduce Reuse Reanimate by Carter Reid, (independent)

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (Long Form)

  • Guardians of the Galaxy, James Gunn
  • Interstellar, Christopher Nolan
  • The Lego Movie, Phil Lord and Christopher Miller

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (Short Form)

  • Grimm: “Once We Were Gods”
  • The Flash – “The Flash (pilot)”

BEST EDITOR (Short Form)

  • Jennifer Brozek, Shattered Shields
  •  Bryan Thomas Schmidt, Shattered Shields
  •  Mike Resnick, Galaxy’s Edge
  •  Edmund R. Schubert, Orson Scott Card’s InterGalactic Medicine Show

BEST EDITOR (Long Form)

  • Toni Weisskopf, Baen Books
  •  Jim Minz, Baen Books
  •  Anne Sowards, ACE/ROC
  •  Sheila Gilbert, DAW

BEST PROFESSIONAL ARTIST

  • Carter Reid
  •  Jon Eno
  •  Alan Pollack
  • Nick Greenwood

BEST FANZINE

  • Tangent SF On-line, Dave Truesdale
  •  Elitist Book Reviews,  Steve Diamond
  •  The Revenge of Hump Day, Tim Bolgeo

BEST FANCAST

  •  “The Sci Phi Show”, Jason Rennie
  •  Dungeon Crawlers Radio
  •  Adventures in SF Publishing

BEST FAN WRITER

  • Jeffro Johnson
  • Amanda Green
  •  Cedar Sanderson

THE JOHN W. CAMPBELL AWARD

  •  Eric S. Raymond, “Sucker Punch”, Riding the Red Horse
  • Jason Cordova, Kaiju Apocalypse
  •  Kary Englis, Flight of the Kikayon

NOMINEES APPEARING ONLY ON SAD PUPPIES 3

BEST SEMIPROZINE

  • Abyss & Apex *
  • Andromeda Spaceways In-Flight Magazine *

BEST FAN WRITER

  • Dave Freer *

 

NOMINEES APPEARING ONLY ON RABID PUPPIES 2015

BEST NOVELLA

  • “The Plural of Helen of Troy” by John C. Wright, City Beyond Time / Castalia House **
  •  “Pale Realms of Shade” by John C. Wright, , The Book of Feasts & Seasons / Castalia House **

BEST NOVELETTE

  •  “Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus” by John C. Wright,TheBook of Feasts & Seasons/ Castalia House **

BEST SHORT STORY

  • “Turncoat” by Steve Rzasa, Riding the Red Horse **
  • “The Parliament of Beasts and Birds” by John C. Wright, The Book of Feasts & Seasons **

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (Short Form)

  • Game of Thrones: “The Mountain and the Viper” **

BEST EDITOR (Short Form)

  •  Vox Day, Riding the Red Horse, Castalia House **

BEST EDITOR (Long Form)

  •  Vox Day, Castalia House **

BEST FANZINE

  •  Black Gate, John O’Neill **

THE JOHN W. CAMPBELL AWARD

  • Rolf Nelson, The Stars Came Back **

 

NOMINEES NOT APPEARING ON EITHER LIST

BEST NOVEL

  • Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison (Sarah Monette) (Tor Books)

BEST GRAPHIC STORY

  • Ms. Marvel Volume 1: No Normal written by G. Willow Wilson, illustrated by Adrian Alphona  and Jake Wyatt, (Marvel Comics)
  • Rat Queens Volume 1: Sass and Sorcery written by Kurtis J. Weibe, art by Roc Upchurch (Image Comics)
  • Saga Volume 3 written by Brian K. Vaughan, illustrated by Fiona Staples (Image Comics)
  • Sex Criminals Volume 1: One Weird Trick written by Matt Fraction, art by Chip Zdarsky (Image Comics)

DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (LONG FORM)

  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier screenplay by Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely, concept and story by Ed Brubaker, directed by Anthony Russo and Joe Russo (Marvel Entertainment, Perception, Sony Pictures Imageworks)
  • Edge of Tomorrow screenplay by Christopher McQuarrie, Jez Butterworth, and John-Henry Butterworth, directed by Doug Liman (Village Roadshow, RatPac-Dune Entertainment, 3 Arts Entertainment; Viz Productions)

DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (SHORT FORM)

  • Doctor Who: “Listen” written by Steven Moffat, directed by Douglas Mackinnon (BBC Television)
  • Orphan Black: “By Means Which Have Never Yet Been Tried” written by Graham Manson, directed by John Fawcett (Temple Street Productions, Space/BBC America)

BEST PROFESSIONAL ARTIST

  • Julie Dillon

BEST SEMIPROZINE

  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies edited by Scott H. Andrews
  • Lightspeed Magazine edited by John Joseph Adams, Stefan Rudnicki, Rich Horton, Wendy N. Wagner, and Christie Yant
  • Strange Horizons Niall Harrison Editor-in-Chief

BEST FANZINE

  • Journey Planet edited by James Bacon, Chris Garcia, Alissa McKersie, Colin Harris and Helen Montgomery

BEST FANCAST

  • Galactic Suburbia Podcast Alisa Krasnostein, Alexandra Pierce, Tansy Rayner Roberts (Presenters) and Andrew Finch (Producer)
  • Tea and Jeopardy Emma Newman & Peter Newman

BEST FAN WRITER

  • Laura J. Mixon

BEST FAN ARTIST

  • Ninni Aalto
  • Brad Foster
  • Elizabeth Leggett
  • Spring Schoenhuth
  • Steve Stiles

CAMPBELL AWARD FOR BEST NEW WRITER

  • Wesley Chu

123 thoughts on “Entering the Lists

  1. Chlamydia wrote: “Bullshit, Torling. You gave us freaking REDSHIRTS. You gave us that idiotic Swirsky DINOSAUR MY LOVE story. You even put bloody ZOE’S TALE on the shortlist.”

    You are so amazingly pathetic. It just eats you up inside, doesn’t it? You must lose sleep thinking about Scalzi Scalzi Scalzi. You’re like some pathetic cartoon villain.

  2. VD:
    You are arguing a fallacy. People will vote against sad puppies for entries because they dont like the work, not because they disagree with sad puppies. Some of the sad puppies nominations have wide appeal (and I liked them.myself.) They are likely to win. Some don’t. (And some are in throw-at-the-wall territory.) They are unlikely to win. There are 1500 fans out of 1800 who did not vote for your ticket in the primaries. Don’t be surprised if it loses in the general election.

  3. @Pete Mack on April 5, 2015 at 8:45 pm said:

    “VD:
    You are arguing a fallacy. People will vote against sad puppies for entries because they dont like the work, not because they disagree with sad puppies. ”

    He says, on the very thread where people are loudly proclaiming that they will, and others should, vote No Award above any story on the Sad Puppies list without bothering to read them.

  4. Paula Liberman
    “I was annoyed back in the Old Days when the standard SF story had white presumably Christian male humans as representatives of homo sapiens”
    Do you assume that there is some “white culture” unique to all people just because of their skin colour? Do you believe a person born in Minsk has the same cultural background ans a white person born in Denver or London? It’s just a skin colour, there are numerous diverse national and cultural groups who are different from each other despite having similar colour of the skin. And be shocked, some of them face more racism and discrimination in the West than some non-whites.
    Attacks on white Eastern Europeans in UK are more widespread and tolerated than attacks on Japanese or Koreans for example.
    The whole idea that somebody represents some collective culture and traits just because he has some skin colour is frankly incredibly ignorant to say it lightly.
    One of the reasons I detest Scalzi for saying that just because you were born with certain colour of your skin your life is easiest imaginable. Yes I am sure a person born in Kiev has much easier life than a person born in Tokyo.

  5. I’d like to point out an error in your scorecard:
    “Failing to make the final ballot were 4 items recommended on both lists, plus 5 items that only appeared on Rabid Puppies” is wrong. Charles Gannon’s Trial By Fire was only on the Sad Puppies list. I nominated both novels (so far) in his series, and neither one made the final cut.

  6. Bruce: Thanks for the note on Gannon which revealed I needed to make corrections to one of my sets. My proof count of things that didn’t make the final ballot now reconciles.

  7. Hi Jon H, good job completely missing the point.

    The point is that it’s trivially easy to identify items that never would have received a Hugo nomination in a sane world, but did receive nominations, and even awards, in this one.

    It is further possible to point out that in many of those cases, the most likely explanation for the miscarriages of justice is that Scalzi joined, worked with, and benefited from an SJW clique that pushed works based on politics and connections, not on quality.

    Or would you like to claim that idiotic Swirsky DINOSAUR MY LOVE story actually diserved a Hugo nomination? That Redshirts was the Best SFF Novel of its year?

  8. JJ on April 4, 2015 at 5:38 pm said:

    Voter Registration Drives don’t tell people how to vote. At least the legitimate ones don’t.

    The ones that do are called “ballot-stuffing”.

    What world do you live in, JJ? Here in the US, we get dozens of “voting slates” every election

  9. Dear “Protest Manager.” You have left three comments. They will not appear until you claim your registration by answering my verification e-mail. Assuming that e-mail account exists. At least it didn’t bounce.

  10. xdpaul, you’re assuming a metaphor — that the Hugos should be viewed as competitive sports, and the SP are better at playing by those rules than their opponents. The problem is coming in is that their opponents were engaging in a different metaphor.

    Reminds me a bit of when my uncle and I talked D&D. His teenaged interest in D&D lead to wargames because he was all about tactics and about trying to defeat the monster with the least resources (and vice versa on the GM’s part) and the story wasn’t important. Mine lead to interactive fiction, because our interest in D&D was about telling stories about people who regularly fought things, and you really only needed the D&D rules for the fights and not the stories.

    Now, if we had one person from one group and a DM from the other, there are going to be problems because the goal (or win condition) is different. And if you don’t understand that other people play D&D differently than you, you’re going to assume it’s because they’re bad at it, not that they are playing under different unspoken rules.

    (Elizabeth Bear helped me cement the metaphor via her blog posts.) And part of it is that we all agreed to the rules as written, but until this year, we didn’t really realize how many rules (or norms) of upright Hugo behavior were unwritten and passed via word of mouth by the community.

    So hence the ‘this has to be against the rules’ and ‘if it isn’t, it should be’ or ‘if it isn’t, it’s still scummy and we need to discourage this before others adapt this strategy*’.

    * Several writers I know have issued statements saying that if they are aware of slate voting, even if it is a slate of things they like, they will automatically not vote for anything on a slate (and hopefully asked to be removed and decline nominations if they find themselves on a slate). Because they dislike slates more than they like any individual story.

  11. So there is a degree of ‘Marsha Marsha Marsha’ in all these Scalzi ranting. I had to go back and check to remind myself what I voted for and what one. The year Scalzi and Stross were on a hugely popular work by a massive best selling author won… His name was neither Scalzi nor Stross. I didn’t nominate the Scalzi nor vote for it myself, I did vote for Anathem for the first slot then Stross, Little Brother and No Award – if my memory serves.

    As others have remarked, for somebody who claims not to care about this, you then go off on a bit of a rant about a comedy Nemesis you’ve created in your head and then make up a lot of stuff actually not in evidence.

    The year Redshirts won, I’m fairly sure I voted Crescent Moon then No Award because I didn’t like the others and Redshirts, frankly, didn’t deserve it.

    What amuses the hell out of me, for the all the comments about writing the ‘right kind of science fiction with spaceships and ray guns’, Scalzi’s early work was straight spaceships and rayguns MilSF. It feels like a hate campaign because having had people like Glenn Reynolds vouch for his work, he turned out not to share the same worldview.

    Slates are bad. They were bad in Student Union politics 25 odd years ago, they’re crap for this.

  12. So there is a degree of ‘Marsha Marsha Marsha’ in all thisScalzi ranting. I had to go back and check to remind myself what I voted for and what won. The year Scalzi and Stross were on a hugely popular work by a massive best selling author won… His name was neither Scalzi nor Stross. I didn’t nominate the Scalzi nor vote for it myself, I did vote for Anathem for the first slot then Stross, Little Brother and No Award – if my memory serves.

    As others have remarked, for somebody who claims not to care about this, you then go off on a bit of a rant about a comedy Nemesis you’ve created in your head and then make up a lot of stuff actually not in evidence.

    The year Redshirts won, I’m fairly sure I voted Crescent Moon then No Award because I didn’t like the others and Redshirts, frankly, didn’t deserve it.

    What amuses the hell out of me, for the all the comments about writing the ‘right kind of science fiction with spaceships and ray guns’, Scalzi’s early work was straight spaceships and rayguns MilSF. It feels like a hate campaign because having had people like Glenn Reynolds vouch for his work, he turned out not to share the same worldview.

    Slates are bad. They were bad in Student Union politics 25 odd years ago, they’re crap for this.

  13. Scalzi, Scalzi, Scalzi, Scalzi. Please, this pathological hatred of Scalzi is embarrassing to watch. I swear to God I think that if I walked up to a Sad or Rabid Puppy and whispered his name in their ear they’d go berserk, run around the room, frothing, screaming, “Moe, Larry, Heinlein. Moe, Larry, Heinlein”.
    But seriously, did Redshirts deserve the Hugo? I don’t know. I didn’t read it. My wife did and was surprised it won a Hugo She thought it was a lot of fun but rather slight. But Redshirts was not the first book written by a fan favorite that was nominated or won the Hugo and it won’t be the last. Just off the top of my head I can think of winning novels by Bujold, Willis, and Vinge that were classics and deserved the Hugo. I also believe they had other Hugo wins mainly because they were popular fan favorites. Did Seanan McGuire deserve all those nominations? I don’t know. I never even heard of her before that year and I also didn’t participate in the Hugo elections so I didn’t read them. But she is a real fan favorite with a lot of people. Does this year’s fan favorite author John C Wright deserve all his nominations? I don’t know, I haven’t read them yet. But with Scalzi, please, I’m begging you, put another record on.

  14. I am not sure in which categories the things are actually worse – the ones where the puppies sneaked 5 nominees (and made sure that this category is fully irrelevant this year) or the ones where they have only 4 (and there is one legitimate). In a way handing the Hugo to that one legitimate nominee sounds strange – not that any of those artists are responsible for the mess they ended up in or could not have won the award but winning this year will be bittersweet at best and they do not have the chance to actually be in a real vote against other nominees… And the artist with the most nominations is not always the one winning at the end after all – it is just the one that is the most exposed during the nominations…

  15. Just for the record: I do not know Vox Day, I -never- asked him to put me on the Rabid Puppies list, and based on his writings and utterances I consider him both certifiable and dangerous.

  16. And you didn’t need help from a slate any of the other 30 or so times you got on the final ballot….

  17. And yet getting on the final ballot 30 or so times “robbed deserving others of slots!”

    I mean, sauce for the goose here.

  18. I know Correia declined his nomination but what other three entries on both lists failed to make the final ballot?

  19. Ed: In addition to Correia: Maze Runner, Orson Scott Card’s Intergalactic Medicine Show and Matthew David Surridge.

  20. Getting back here belatedly….

    David Lokanski on April 6, 2015 at 1:50 played the derail/red herring/move the playing area game with,

    “Do you assume that there is some “white culture” unique to all people just because of their skin colour? Do you believe a person born in Minsk has the same cultural background ans a white person born in Denver or London? It’s just a skin colour, there are numerous diverse national and cultural groups who are different from each other despite having similar colour of the skin. And be shocked, some of them face more racism and discrimination in the West than some non-whites.
    “Attacks on white Eastern Europeans in UK are more widespread and tolerated than attacks on Japanese or Koreans for example.”

    What’s the proportion of Eastern Europeans in the UK compared with Japanese or Koreans? Yes, there are cultural roles, and there is that thing called “the Russian mafia,” which causes crime even in the USA… But you’re doing the “baffle with bullshit” and move the playing field game. And then again, I remember someone originally from Russia when I was in Israel, who was just as male chauvinistic piggish as western male chauvinist pigs… he was wife-hunting and apparently thought I might be a potential candidate.

    So despite hostility to Slavic and Eastern European otherwise white males in Europe, there’s lot of misogyny in their cultures, too And as regards Christian, while the one I ran into in Jerusalem wasn’t Christian, just ask non-Christians from Russia etc. how much tolerance there is… my sister met a women from Ukraine whose attitude was a pox upon both sides of the Russia/Ukraine current incivilties, both sides are anti-Semitic….

    “I am sure a person born in Kiev has much easier life than a person born in Tokyo”

    Ask that of the Ainu and people of Korean ancestry denied Japanese citizen, despite being born and raised in Japan for multiple generations, and speaking Japanese and having not identity as Korean…. .

    Some else mentioned Seanan McGuire. Does Seanan deserve her Hugos? The two story Barnes Noble fifteen minutes away from where i live, puts out at least fifteen, maybe twenty copies of any new books of hers on the shelves, three to four times as many at the typical SF/F paperback. That’s a sign that the general public likes her writing, not only Hugo nominators and voters.

  21. It’s pretty obvious that the VD commenting in this thread is Vox Day/Theodore Beale. A lot the details he’s reporting are repeated in his blog.

    FWIW, I plan on reading and rating on the final voting Hugo ballot as usual, because I understand many of the people on the Sad/Rabid Puppy slates didn’t ask to associated with it. Why punish them? I will likely leave some categories unvoted on, but I’m a slow reader and likely will be unable to read everything.

    Congratulations on the success of your slate, Vox Day. However, it wouldn’t leave such a bad taste in the mouths of the impartial Hugo voters if you weren’t gloating so much over it.

  22. FWIW, I’ve done something I never did before. After I heard about this, I joined WorldCon as a supporting member. I will try to read nominated works if the Con sends out a package, but for the most part I will vote for No Award above the slate nominees.

  23. I’ve never voted before, but I’ve now joined as a Supporting Member, simply so that I can cast a reasoned vote against the chaos the slates have created this year.

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