See London like never before: Interactive model plots the capital's underground lines, iconic skyline and how the city has grown

 

  • The 1:2000 scale model covers 33 square miles (85 sq km) of London from Old Oak Common to Royal Docks
  • It is interactive and integrated iPads will allow buildings and major infrastructure projects to be digitally animated
  • Called the New London Model, it consists of more than 60 interlocking pieces based on data from Ordnance Survey
  • Display will be open to the public at the NLA galleries at The Building Centre in London from 23 April

The first road networks across London were laid 2,000 years ago and since then the city has swelled and expanded to the densely populated behemoth it is today. 

This growth, as well as the future developments planned across the capital, are just two of the features showcased on a new interactive 3D model due to go on display tomorrow.

The 1:2000 scale New London Model covers 33 square miles (85 sq km) of London from Old Oak Common in the west to Royal Docks in the east, Nine Elms in the south to King's Cross and the site of London's 2012 Olympics in the north. 

It was unveiled by New London Architecture at the NLA Galleries and goes on display to the public from 23 April at the Building Centre in London. 

The 1:2000 scale New London Model covers 33 square miles (85 sq km) of London from Old Oak Common in the west to Royal Docks in the east, Nine Elms in the south to King's Cross and the site of London's 2012 Olympics in the north. The Shard is pictured to the right of the Thames with Canary Wharf out of focus in the background

The 1:2000 scale New London Model covers 33 square miles (85 sq km) of London from Old Oak Common in the west to Royal Docks in the east, Nine Elms in the south to King's Cross and the site of London's 2012 Olympics in the north. The Shard is pictured to the right of the Thames with Canary Wharf out of focus in the background

Using Ordnance Survey's 'height and footprint' digital building data, the New London Model has a perimeter of 104 feet (32 metres) and consists of more than 60 interlocking pieces.

It measures 39 feet (12 metres) long, covers 19 out of the 32 boroughs of London, plus the City of London, and approximately 170,000 buildings, including 111,548 feet (34km) of the Thames with 21 of its bridges.

The model took four months to build and was created by model makers Pipers using 3D printing and laser cutting. 

To create its various interactive elements, integrated iPads allow buildings and major infrastructure projects to be digitally animated across the surface of the model.

Using Ordnance Survey's 'height and footprint' digital building data, the New London Model (London Eye illuminated) has a perimeter of 104 feet (32 metres) and consists of more than 60 interlocking pieces. To create its various interactive elements, integrated iPads allow buildings and major infrastructure projects to be digitally animated  across the surface of the model

Using Ordnance Survey's 'height and footprint' digital building data, the New London Model (London Eye illuminated) has a perimeter of 104 feet (32 metres) and consists of more than 60 interlocking pieces. To create its various interactive elements, integrated iPads allow buildings and major infrastructure projects to be digitally animated across the surface of the model

A projection system is used to beam lights that plot the location of various underground lines, for example, (pictured) highlight the boundaries of 19 of London's 32 boroughs, plus the City of London, and reveal how these boroughs have evolved over time

A projection system is used to beam lights that plot the location of various underground lines, for example, (pictured) highlight the boundaries of 19 of London's 32 boroughs, plus the City of London, and reveal how these boroughs have evolved over time

A projection system is used to beam lights that plot underground lines, for example, highlight the boundaries of boroughs and reveal how these boroughs have evolved.

Other interactive features include mapping people movements, clusters of buildings and films that tell the story of London's development. 

And looking forward, these animations will be used to show how major developments and transport infrastructures are expected to look and how they fit in with their surroundings. 

Other interactive features include mapping people movements, clusters of buildings and films that tell the story of London's development. Looking forward, these animations will be used to show how major developments and transport infrastructures are expected to look and how they fit in with their surroundings. The West End is pictured

Other interactive features include mapping people movements, clusters of buildings and films that tell the story of London's development. Looking forward, these animations will be used to show how major developments and transport infrastructures are expected to look and how they fit in with their surroundings. The West End is pictured

The New London Model will continue to be updated with projects that have planning permission or are under construction. It will go on display  to the public at the NLA galleries at The Building Centre in London from 23 April

The New London Model will continue to be updated with projects that have planning permission or are under construction. It will go on display to the public at the NLA galleries at The Building Centre in London from 23 April

This includes Crossrail and the upgrade of London Bridge Station, which are under construction, and future projects such as Crossrail 2 and High Speed 2. It also extends out to Earl's Court and White City - both major areas of proposed change.

The designers said the New London Model will continue to be updated with projects that have planning permission or are under construction.

David Roberts, Ordnance Survey's Land and Property Strategic Relationship Manager, said: 'It is exciting to demonstrate in such a visual way how the use of OS information and solutions can underpin the work of developers, the insurance and legal industries as well as transport planners. 

'OS is driving several exciting advances in 3D and the built environment right now and the opportunity for us to include our premier mapping, building heights and imagery data into the new model has clearly helped reduce the time and costs in production.' 

It measures 39 feet (12 metres) features 19 out of the 32 boroughs of London, plus the City of London, and approximately 170,000 buildings, including 111,548 feet (34km) of the Thames with 21 of its bridges.The model (pictured) took four months to build and was created by model makers Pipers using 3D printing and laser cutting

It measures 39 feet (12 metres) features 19 out of the 32 boroughs of London, plus the City of London, and approximately 170,000 buildings, including 111,548 feet (34km) of the Thames with 21 of its bridges.The model (pictured) took four months to build and was created by model makers Pipers using 3D printing and laser cutting

 


 

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