The app that could save your LIFE: Emergency service tells rescuers HOW to find and save you at the touch of a button

  • The One-touch-911 app was developed by researchers at MIT, Harvard
  • Users call the police, fire service, report a car crash or seek medical help using buttons on the phone's home screen 
  • It automatically sends a person's location, identity and any medical details
  • This works even if the user doesn't have mobile signal or can't speak

More than 250 million emergency calls are made each year but two thirds have inaccurate location information, resulting in an estimated 10,000 deaths. 

To make this process easier, developers in Boston have worked with global emergency response teams to create its One-Touch-911 app. 

Users can call the police, fire service, report a car crash or seek medical help at the press of a button - and it works even if you don't have signal. 

Developers in Boston have worked with global emergency response teams to create its One-Touch-911 app (pictured). Users can call the police, fire service, report a car crash or seek medical help at the press of a single button - and it works even if the user doesn't have signal

Developers in Boston have worked with global emergency response teams to create its One-Touch-911 app (pictured). Users can call the police, fire service, report a car crash or seek medical help at the press of a single button - and it works even if the user doesn't have signal

The app was designed by researchers at Boston-based MIT. 

Each of the four buttons on the app trigger a standard call to nearby dispatchers, and each call is placed with the phone's GPS location, user details and any pre-entered medical information attached. 

If the user doesn't have signal on their network, the app lets them 'roam' onto another network to connect the call. This is a feature built into most phones already. 

MAKING EMERGENCY CALLS WITH ONE-TOUCH-911

The app was designed by researchers at Boston-based MIT. 

Each of the four buttons on the app trigger a standard call to nearby dispatchers, and each call is placed with the phone's GPS location, user details and any pre-entered medical information attached. 

If the user doesn't have signal on their network, the app lets them 'roam' onto another network to connect the call. This is a feature built into most phones already. 

Calls can also be routed through a Wi-Fi network. 

Users can additionally send photos or videos, depending on the emergency dispatcher and the region. 

The app can be used in 135 countries, and is compatible with any three-digit emergency number in these regions.  

Calls can also be routed through a Wi-Fi network. 

Once connected, the caller doesn't have to speak as the majority of the information is sent automatically.

Users can additionally send photos or videos, depending on the emergency dispatcher and the region. 

The app can be used in 135 countries, and is compatible with any three-digit emergency number in these regions. 

It also doesn't require the user to speak the language of the country they are in, which is useful when on holiday.

RapidSOS will begin testing the software in Texas next month and has launched a Kickstarter campaign to launch the app globally.

'We spent two years working with over 100 dispatch centers globally to develop RapidSOS One-Touch-911,' said the firm. 

'This award-winning technology is the most efficient and effective system for communicating during a life-threatening emergency, transmitting data from your phone directly to first responders in a matter of seconds.

Each call is placed with the phone's GPS location, user details and any pre-entered medical information attached (shown). If the user doesn't have signal on their network, the app lets them 'roam' onto another network to connect the call. Calls can also be routed through a Wi-Fi network

Each call is placed with the phone's GPS location, user details and any pre-entered medical information attached (shown). If the user doesn't have signal on their network, the app lets them 'roam' onto another network to connect the call. Calls can also be routed through a Wi-Fi network

'Running off RapidSOS’ emergency communications platform, One-Touch-911 has the built in intelligence to manage any emergency you face: Limited, intermittent, or no cell service? Unable to speak on the phone? Non-native English speaker? No idea where you are? Unsure what precisely to report? No problem. 

'With the push of a button first responders are on their way.'

Elsewhere, the app lets users simultaneously alert multiple friends and families of their emergency at the touch of a button. 

It additionally syncs with physical panic buttons that can be placed around a home, school or office for example, to connect with the app via Bluetooth. 

Pressing the button makes a call to a pre-determined service.  

The app can be used in 135 countries, and is compatible with any three-digit emergency number in these regions (pictured). RapidSOS will begin testing the software in Texas next month and has launched a Kickstarter campaign to launch the app globally

The app can be used in 135 countries, and is compatible with any three-digit emergency number in these regions (pictured). RapidSOS will begin testing the software in Texas next month and has launched a Kickstarter campaign to launch the app globally

Elsewhere, the app lets users simultaneously alert multiple friends and families of their emergency. It additionally syncs with physical panic buttons that can be placed around a home, school or office for example, to connect with the app via Bluetooth. Pressing the button makes a call to a pre-determined service

Elsewhere, the app lets users simultaneously alert multiple friends and families of their emergency. It additionally syncs with physical panic buttons that can be placed around a home, school or office for example, to connect with the app via Bluetooth. Pressing the button makes a call to a pre-determined service

 

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