Cameron gives ministers a month to find answers to broken Britain

Prime Minister David Cameron has given ministers until the October to come up with policies to tackle Britain's 'broken society'

Prime Minister David Cameron has given ministers until the October to come up with policies to tackle Britain's 'broken society'

David Cameron yesterday gave his ministers one month to come up with new policies to tackle Britain’s ‘broken society’ in the wake of the riots.

The Prime Minister returned from his holiday in Cornwall to launch a ‘no- holds-barred’ review of all Government policy designed to address the ‘moral collapse’ blamed for the riots that swept across towns and cities earlier this month.

Mr Cameron chaired the first meeting in Downing Street of the Government’s new social policy review which will draw up the Government’s response to the riots.

Ministers in virtually all departments have been given until October to come up with new initiatives and consider whether other plans need to be accelerated.

The Prime Minister has already indicated that plans for a ‘national citizen service’ will be fast-tracked in the wake of the riots.

The eight-week programme of community service, team-building and physical challenges was due to be offered to 30,000 youngsters next year but could now be expanded to offer places to all 16-year-olds.

But Mr Cameron has asked ministers to examine virtually all government policy, including benefits, schools, policing and human rights to see if more can be done. Earlier this month he said he was determined to turn around the prospects of 120,000 problem families blamed for many of Britain’s social ills.

A Downing Street spokeswoman said the review would look at whether current government initiatives and programmes are ‘big enough and bold enough to deliver the change the country now wants to see’.

She added: ‘It’s to do that check on where we are in terms of existing policy development and whether it continues to meet the demands that have been made.

Home Secretary Theresa May
Iain Duncan Smith

The Prime Minister wants to work out whether Home Secretary Theresa May, left, or Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith is in charge of drawing up new plans to tackle Britain’s gang culture

‘It looks at the whole set of issues regarding broken society - it could be schools, family policy, parenting, communities, human rights, health and safety, cultural, legal, bureaucratic problems, services the government provides and how they are delivered and the signals that government sends about the kind of behaviours that are encouraged and rewarded.’

The Prime Minister also sought to broker a truce between Home Secretary Theresa May and Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith over who is in charge of drawing up new plans to tackle Britain’s gang culture.

Mr Duncan Smith is reported to be pressing for the creation of a new department for social justice to take charge of the issue – an idea resisted by Mrs May.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg will visit Tottenham, where the riots began, today to talk to local residents and businesses about the ongoing impact of the disorder.

The Deputy Prime Minister is expected to announce further details this week about an independent panel being set up to examine the causes and fallout of the riots.

Meanwhile, Labour last night said it would force a Commons vote on controversial Government plans to press ahead with cuts to police budgets despite the riots.

Labour leader Ed Miliband said: ‘After the riots, where we saw the importance of a visible policing presence, I think people really appreciate how wrong-headed this decision to go ahead with the cuts is.’

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