Wives routinely spy on their husbands - but only 40% of women would end marriage if they uncovered infidelity

  • More the one in six say they wouldn't leave their husband if he cheated
  • Some 36% of women and 24% of men think their partner's been unfaithful
  • One in six regularly check their man's internet history
  • And 10% have called husband's office to check he is really there

Would you leave your other half if you discovered they had been kissing others under the mistletoe?

While we may assume that anyone who caught their partner cheating would give them the boot, new research shows this not to be the case.

Startlingly more than six in ten married women admit that even if they did catch their love playing away they wouldn’t leave them.

A suspicious one in six regularly goes through their partner's internet history in a bid to uncover misbehaviours
More than a third of married women suspect their husbands have cheating

Over 30% of women believe their husbands have cheated, and snoop to try and catch him out. Photos posed by models

Some 36 per cent of women and 24 per cent of men polled believe their partner has cheated. And they seem determined to catch them in the act.

A survey by law firm Slater & Gordon shows that one in ten women have called their man’s office to check he is there when he says he will be.

A suspicious one in six regularly goes through their partner’s internet history in a bid to uncover misbehaviour.

A family lawyer at Slater &Gordon Kaleel Anwar says: ‘Nine times out of ten people who come to see us because they are considering a separation have trust issues with their partner.

‘Sometimes this is because they have been given just cause, but trust is normally one of the first issues that leads clients to consider ending a marriage.

‘Without it people can be terribly unhappy.'

Women were most likely to be prompted to start checking up on their husband after a change in his behaviour, while many said their ‘women’s intuition’ made them suspicions.

While men were most likely to get suspicious if their wife was ‘distant’ and less interested in sex.

But despite the sneaking around, more than half of those polled admitted that they hadn’t found anything conclusive and that constantly checking up on their partner had impacted their health.

Many reported that they had anxiety and trouble sleeping and 17 per cent said that their suspicions that they were being lied to had led them to overeat and gain weight.

Startlingly, more than six in ten married women admit that even if they did catch their love playing away they wouldn't leave them. Photo posed by models

Startlingly, more than six in ten married women admit that even if they did catch their love playing away they wouldn't leave them. Photo posed by models

Thirty two per cent said that the lack of trust in their relationship had knocked their confidence and seventy per cent said they kept their fears about their partner’s fidelity to themselves.

One in five admitted they had become ‘paranoid’ and many reported that suspicions about their partner made them depressed and impacted their general health and wellbeing.

Although a fifth said they knew that checking up on their partner was wrong, 17 per cent said it gave them peace of mind.

Kaleel Anwar said: 'In my experience with clients, once that trust is gone, suspicion and paranoia can take hold very quickly.

'Repeated instances of being let down and disappointed by unfaithful partners leads to an unhealthy state of mind, leading to a situation where one of the parties must end the relationship and divorce is, unfortunately more often than not, inevitable in these circumstances.

'I am often dealing with cases where lack of trust has lead to an intolerable level of obsessive control, which has ultimately and sadly led to divorce.'

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