Revealed: Bali Nine mastermind who sent drug mules to Indonesia won $5 million on the LOTTERY after their arrest and is living a life of luxury in Sydney as Australian duo prepare to face the firing squad

  • The mastermind behind the Bali Nine drug trafficking plot lives in Sydney
  • The unnamed man and lotto winner is enjoying an extravagant lifestyle
  • It's alleged the ringleader won $5 million after the nine Australians were arrested in 2005 
  • Two Australians on death row are scheduled for execution this month
  • Indonesia's attorney-general has effectively ruled out any legal challenges

The mastermind behind the Bali Nine drug trafficking plot is allegedly currently enjoying an extravagant lifestyle in Sydney, having literally won the lottery after he escaped all convictions.

The unnamed man is living the high-life whilst two Australian men, Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran, face execution by firing squad this month.

It's alleged the ringleader won $5 million after the nine Australians were arrested in 2005, according to Sydney Morning Herald

This comes as Indonesia's attorney-general said he plans to move this month's executions forward, effectively ruling out the chance of of Chan and Sukumaran's lawyers entering a fresh legal challenge against their death penalties.

Australian Halen Chan (L), the mother of death-row prisoner Andrew Chan, and brother Michael Chan (R), leave after visiting Andrew at Kerobokan Prison on February 10 in Denpasar, Bali

Australian Halen Chan (L), the mother of death-row prisoner Andrew Chan, and brother Michael Chan (R), leave after visiting Andrew at Kerobokan Prison on February 10 in Denpasar, Bali

Ken Chan, the father of Andrew Chan, leaves after visiting Andrew at Kerobokan Prison on February 10

Ken Chan, the father of Andrew Chan, leaves after visiting Andrew at Kerobokan Prison on February 10

The unnamed drug lord who masterminded the Bali Nine plot had been the subject of previous police investigations into drug trafficking before the 2005 bust. However, he stepped away from his life of crime following his incredibly lucky lotto win, according to SMH.

Chan and Sukumaran have never exposed the identity or the person or people they were working for, fearing they would put their families in Australia in danger.

According to Fairfax, the mastermind behind the 2005 Australia to Indonesia drug run is suspected of having a high-level involvement in the syndicate.

Chan and Sukumaran were handed death penalties in 2006 and all subsequent appeals have failed.

The Bali Nine duo's lawyers are planning a challenge of the presidential decree that denied them clemency in the State Administrative Court. 

But Indonesian Attorney-General HM Prasetyo predicts the challenge will fail.

Raji Sukumaran (R), the mother of Myuran Sukumaran, a Australian convicted of drug smuggling on Indonesia's death row, arrives for a visit at Kerobokan jail

Raji Sukumaran (R), the mother of Myuran Sukumaran, a Australian convicted of drug smuggling on Indonesia's death row, arrives for a visit at Kerobokan jail

Andrew Chan's brother Michael arrives to visit his brother on February 10. The families have been visiting frequently following the government's announcement that the two men on death row will be killed this month

Andrew Chan's brother Michael arrives to visit his brother on February 10. The families have been visiting frequently following the government's announcement that the two men on death row will be killed this month

'Clemency is a prerogative which cannot be hindered or challenged by anyone,' he told reporters in Jakarta on Tuesday.

'That's the prerogative right attached to the authority who has it.

'The administrative court cannot change that decision.'

But the attorney-general also said it was also open to the president to reconsider clemency requests.

The two men facing imminent death reportedly only had low-to-mid-level involvement.

However, there are new reports that there is a possibility the execution of the two Australians will be further delayed.

Indonesia's justice and human rights minister, Yasonna Laoly, has claimed the executions may not take place this month due to political tensions, according to ABC News

Family members of Myuran Sukumaran arrive for a visit at Kerobokan jail. The two men on death row recently lost their final appeals for clemency despite arguing that they had rehabilitated themselves in prison

Family members of Myuran Sukumaran arrive for a visit at Kerobokan jail. The two men on death row recently lost their final appeals for clemency despite arguing that they had rehabilitated themselves in prison

The delay would occur due a conflict in Indonesia between corruption investigators and the national police force.

However, attorney-general Muhammad Prasetyo contradicted Laoly's claims, insisting that the executions would go ahead as planned.

Helen Chan, the mother of convicted Bali Nine drug smuggler Andrew Chan, has made an impassioned plea for her son's life to be spared as he, along with Myuran Sukumaran, face execution by firing squad this month.

On the ABC-TV Four Corners program she described his daily life as 'every day he is walking in the valley of death'

Raji Sukumaran, meantime, has on Monday blamed the Australian Federal Police for her son's plight after they tipped off Indonesian authorities but those same officials insist they would do the same again and also into the future.

'It's a strange thing to wish to spend the rest of your life in prison. But we don't want them to die,' she said.

The families of the Australians on death row have made a trip to Jakarta's presidential palace on to plead for the two Sydney men to be spared.

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Helen Chan, mother of Australian death row prisoner Andrew Chan, accompanied by her son Michael, has pleaded to Indonesian authorities to spare her son from the death penalty

Helen Chan, mother of Australian death row prisoner Andrew Chan, accompanied by her son Michael, has pleaded to Indonesian authorities to spare her son from the death penalty

Raji Sukumaran, mother of convicted Australian drug-smuggler, Myuran Sukumaran, reacts after making an emotional appeal to Indonesian authorities not to carry out the execution of her son during a media conference in Jakarta on Monday. The mothers of the two Australians facing the executive begged authorities to 'spare our sons' lives', as their lawyers revealed plans for a last-gasp legal bid

Raji Sukumaran, mother of convicted Australian drug-smuggler, Myuran Sukumaran, reacts after making an emotional appeal to Indonesian authorities not to carry out the execution of her son during a media conference in Jakarta on Monday. The mothers of the two Australians facing the executive begged authorities to 'spare our sons' lives', as their lawyers revealed plans for a last-gasp legal bid

Raji Sukumaran, the mother of death-row prisoner Myuran Sukumaran, her son Chintu Sukumaran (far left), is pictured with Helen Chan (second from right), the mother of fellow death-row inmater Andrew Chan, and her son Michael Chan (far right) during a visit at the national human rights commission in Jakarta

Raji Sukumaran, the mother of death-row prisoner Myuran Sukumaran, her son Chintu Sukumaran (far left), is pictured with Helen Chan (second from right), the mother of fellow death-row inmater Andrew Chan, and her son Michael Chan (far right) during a visit at the national human rights commission in Jakarta

He is willing to face it, he is not ignoring his wrongdoing,' she said.

'This is what I am proud of. I feel that he is very down to earth - facing death every day, but not crying or making a scene.

'Therefore this time when I see him, although I am sad, I have inner peace.'

Her son Andrew told Four Corners that he will continue to read and stay fit.

'Here I am, I sit here and I study. People say I can't. I sit here on a death-row sentence and most people turn around and go, 'It's a waste of time.' I believe it's not. I believe the Lord has a purpose for me. And it's not here and it's not to die.'

Bali Nine duo Myuran Sukumaran (left) and Andrew Chan (right) could be executed by the end of the month

Bali Nine duo Myuran Sukumaran (left) and Andrew Chan (right) could be executed by the end of the month

Sukumaran's mother Raji and his brother Chinthu along with Chan's mother Helen and his brother Michael will meet with Indonesia's national human rights organisation Komnas HAM to set forth the legal battle in a bid to save the condemned pair's lives.

'Our days are very difficult, we can't stop thinking of what will happen and the violent way he will be killed. My mum keeps thinking about his and Andrew's dead body being handed to her, she is having nightmares,' Chinthu Sukumaran said.

'Why is it that the Indonesian president does not give him a chance and have pity on us being aged parents?' Ms Chan told Four Corners.

'We are old and in poor health and we do not have long to live, therefore we would not like to see our son go before us.'

It follows after the lawyer who represented the Bali Nine ringleaders when they were first sentenced to death row is putting his job on the line by claiming he has new evidence that could save the duo.

Australians on death row Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran are scheduled for execution this month. 'I was stupid. I didn't really think through the consequences or anything. Somebody asked me to do something and I just sort of did it' Myuran Sukumaran said to Four Corners

Australians on death row Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran are scheduled for execution this month. 'I was stupid. I didn't really think through the consequences or anything. Somebody asked me to do something and I just sort of did it' Myuran Sukumaran said to Four Corners

In an extraordinary twist, Muhammad Rifan says he has 'never revealed evidence' that could discredit him but he was prepared to ' take the heat' for the Australian drug smugglers, Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran, who are expected to face the firing squad by the end of the month.

'It's something that implicates us, it could discredit me. But for them I will take it. I told Myuran it's okay,' he said. 'It's one last thing I can do for them.'

'Those judges, I believe they were very sorry because after sentencing them to death, they told me that was not want they wanted.

'This highlights the problems that time, between the Indonesian government and the Australian government.

'Look, you know, I think every criminal, what rushes to their mind, they're not gonna get busted, full stop,' said Andrew Chan

'Look, you know, I think every criminal, what rushes to their mind, they're not gonna get busted, full stop,' said Andrew Chan

'I see at that time, the judges were not independent in sentencing the case.'

Even though the families blame the Australian Federal Police for the son's fate, Mike Phelan, who led the Australian probe into the Bali Nine, said: 'I think it's a tragedy that we've got young lives that are potentially facing the death penalty, but I believe it was a successful operation and, you know, taking eight kilograms of heroin, which is a very significant amount of heroin, off the streets is a significant operation.'

Sukumaran admitted on the ABC program: 'I was stupid. I didn't really think through the consequences or anything. Somebody asked me to do something and I just sort of did it because they were my friends and I trusted them and I believed in them.

'Look, you know, I think every criminal, what rushes to their mind, they're not gonna get busted, full stop,' said Andrew Chan.

But a final clear warning from Mr Phelan. 

'Even with the aid of hindsight, should the same set of circumstances present themselves again with another syndicate or other people, we would exactly the same thing.'