Infamous 'ditch the witch' sign used in protest against Julia Gillard for sale on Gumtree - and the owner wants $3,000

  • The placard appeared at a anti-carbon tax rally outside Parliament House at Canberra in March of 2011
  • Tony Abbott, then opposition leader, was slammed for indirectly endorsing it when he delivered a national speech in front of them 
  • Advertisements for the sign have appeared on both Gum Tree and Trading Post where the current owner, Peter, is looking to sell it for about $3000
  • He denied it was sexist and claimed it was a 'wise investment' 

The infamous 'ditch the witch' placard that was broadcast behind the then opposition leader Tony Abbott as he spoke at an anti-carbon tax rally on national television, has been put up for sale.

Advertisements for the 'historic' sign have appeared on both Gum Tree and Trading Post where the current owner, Peter, is looking to sell it for about $3000.

Although it has been listed since January 2014, Peter told Daily Mail Australia that he had received a lot of interest in the item which is being sold in its own wooden case along with a 'certificate of authenticity'.

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Advertisements for the 'historic' sign have appeared on both Gum Tree and Trading Post where the current owner, Peter, is looking to sell it for about $3000

Advertisements for the 'historic' sign have appeared on both Gum Tree and Trading Post where the current owner, Peter, is looking to sell it for about $3000

The sign infamously appeared behind then opposition leader Tony Abbot during a protest outside Parliament House in Canberra in March of 2011

The sign infamously appeared behind then opposition leader Tony Abbot during a protest outside Parliament House in Canberra in March of 2011

'We've had a lot of interest because it is a collectable item never to be repeated and it got international fame,' he said.

In the online item description, he wrote: 'This piece of political history helped to heighten public awareness throughout Australia. Now Prime Minister Tony Abbott was regularly seen beside the sign that helped topple a very unpopular Labor government.'

The sign was amongst many controversial and offensive placards about former prime minister Julia Gillard that appeared at the protest outside Parliament House in Canberra in March of 2011, including one which read 'Juliar….Bob Brown's B****'.

Mr Abbott was slammed for choosing to stand in front of the signs during his speech about climate change.

The sign was one of many controversial and offensive placards about former prime minister Julia Gillard (left) that appeared at the protest. Mr Abbott (right) was slammed for choosing to stand in front of the signs during his speech

Infuriated members of the public dubbed the indirect endorsement of the slogans as a sexist move by the Liberal party.

'I wasn't shocked that some people had those sentiments, not shocked by that, but shocked that it was so visibly called forth into the public debate and that it didn't get the sort of odium from mainstream commentators that it should have,' Ms Gillard told Crikey in 2014 while reflecting on the events.

However Peter, who said he acquired the sign from its original owner, denied that it was intentionally sexist.

Infuriated members of the public dubbed the indirect endorsement of the slogans as a sexist move by the Liberal party

Although it has been listed since January 2014, Peter said he had received a lot of interest in the item which is being sold in its own wooden case along with a 'certificate of authenticity'

Although it has been listed since January 2014, Peter said he had received a lot of interest in the item which is being sold in its own wooden case along with a 'certificate of authenticity'

'That's the way some people decided to misconstrue the point of the sign,' he said.

'They turned it into an issue of misogyny and it was really a very simply message in decoding that someone of the political people at the time were not appropriate for Australia.'

Describing it as a 'wise investment' that 'will gain value predictably as the years progress', he later added: 'My intention with the proceeds is that some of them may go to a charitable organisations or a number'.  

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