Back pain sufferer has odd-shaped teeth fixed in bid to alter his chewing action 'that's responsible for his agony'

  • Martin Hedley is having his wonky teeth fixed to cure crippling back pain 
  • He has been in constant agony since childhood with pain in his back
  • His odd-shaped teeth are to blame for an uneven chewing motion
  • This can cause severe tension on the skull, leading to back distortion 

Martin Hedley, 27, is having his odd-shaped teeth fixed to cure his crippling back pain

Martin Hedley, 27, is having his odd-shaped teeth fixed to cure his crippling back pain

A man is having his wonky teeth fixed - to cure crippling back pain he has endured since childhood. 

Martin Hedley, 27, of Upholland, near Skelmersdale, Lancashire, has suffered bouts of sickening pain when he has been unable to get out of bed because of the agony in his back.

Now, he is having his odd-shaped teeth straightened by an expert who says they are to blame for an uneven chewing motion that results in painful neck and back distortion. 

Mr Hedley has been in constant pain since he was 12 years old and was forced to withdraw from school as the torment became unbearable.

His pain has become even more acute in the last six years. Despite numerous appointments with a range of medical experts, nobody could identify the cause of his problem. 

Determined to end his misery, Mr Hedley conducted his own research and found that badly uneven teeth and a jarring chewing motion can cause severe tension on the skull, leading to pain in the neck and back.

It then dawned on him that his shooting pains got worse every time he had a meal. 

He said: 'Hard foods would be more painful than soft foods. 

'It doesn't matter if it's a piece of concrete or a grape, it's the actual motion of bringing your teeth together. If you've got a distortion when they come together, it will affect the rest of your body.'

Despite numerous appointments with a range of medical experts, nobody could identify the root of the problem

Despite numerous appointments with a range of medical experts, nobody could identify the root of the problem

After conventional medics ran out of ideas, he tried alternative therapies and found people with similar pain to him had been cured by getting their bad teeth mended through 'whole body dentistry'.

The treatment involves adding overlays on to teeth to level them off, as well as using orthodontics to straighten teeth and ease pressure on the skull.

The pioneer of the treatment is Dr Gerald Smith, based in Philadelphia, and two weeks ago Mr Hedley flew to America for the first of numerous treatments with him to level out his teeth.

It has already cost him thousands of pounds but he hopes it will allow him to get his life back on track.  

He said: 'I would basically get my life back which feels like it's been on hold for six years. Just to get out of bed and not have the first thing in my mind: My back's really painful.

'I've become used to it because it's all I know.'

After conventional medics ran out of ideas, he tried alternative therapies and found people with similar pain to him had been cured by getting their bad teeth mended through 'whole body dentistry'

After conventional medics ran out of ideas, he tried alternative therapies and found people with similar pain to him had been cured by getting their bad teeth mended through 'whole body dentistry'

Mr Hedley will return to America in early 2015 but is already feeling the benefit of his first session. 

He said: 'It's not instantaneous but I can feel my bite is a lot better.

'But my body has been in this position so long, it doesn't just instantaneously change - it'll slowly unwind.'

Dr Smith said he was confident Mr Hedley's life of pain will soon be resolved.

He said: 'This innovative non-invasive technology has been successfully used to resolve many lower back pain problems like Martin's and in many cases helped patients avoid surgery.'

Last night, UK-based dentistry expert Malcolm Meneaud, president of the Yorkshire branch of the British Dental Association, said: 'There is a school of thought that poor jaw posture - because the teeth don't meet properly - can have a knock-on effect, causing migranes, neck ache and back ache.' 

To help raise funds to pay for Mr Hedley's travel expenses, please access his Go Fund Me page.  

 

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