Subject: Puddling Butterfly
Location: Coryell County, TX
September 4, 2015 1:10 pm
Hello! I think this beautiful butterfly may be another Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes). It was puddling in a drainage area. So gorgeous! The wind was buffeting it about somewhat; today is partly cloudy and quite warm, 90 degrees. No significant rain for over a month, so any moisture is appreciated by wildlife.
Best wishes!
Signature: Ellen

Puddling Giant Swallowtail

Puddling Giant Swallowtail

Hi Ellen,
How nice to hear from you again.  Your puddling Giant Swallowtail is an excellent addition to our archives.

Melissa Cooley, Annette Hollenbush, Mike Maxwell, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My morning mailbox surprise
Location: Dayton, OH
September 3, 2015 5:47 am
Good morning! Today, this little guy was waiting to ask me how badly I really wanted to check the mail today. He hung around long enough for me to get a couple of pictures, did an impressive flyby in the general direction of my face, and took off.
I don’t know if it’s at all relevant, but there was also a large house centipede behind the mailbox, which was another first.
Signature: Amorette

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

Dear Amorette,
We don’t believe there is any connection between the House Centipede and the Hanging Thief, a large predatory Robber Fly.  Hanging Thieves, though predators, tend to take prey on the wing and House Centipedes would not be part of their diet.  They often feed while dangling from a single leg, hence the common name Hanging Thief.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Veikko Juhani Loponen, Renee Sturm Dunne, Christy Harris, Pamella Dunlap, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post

Subject: What is this ?
Location: Peyton,CO
September 3, 2015 5:17 pm
This guy/gal was walking on the porch in Colorado.
Signature: Colorado plains

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

This parasitic Ichneumon has a much stouter body than most of its numerous family members, and we believe we have correctly identified it as Trogus pennator thanks to excellent images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Trogus pennator is a parasitoid of swallowtail butterflies (Papilionidae), ovipositing in the caterpillars.”

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Ann Levitsky, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: insects mating
Location: knoxville tn
September 3, 2015 4:26 pm
Just wondering if you have any idea of what these bugs are that appear to be mating in my back yard?
Signature: a meredith

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Dear a meredith,
Thanks to the window glass, you were able to provide us with a thrilling ventral view of a pair of mating Red Footed Cannibalflies.

Alfonso Moreno, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Kyla Gunter Gatlin liked this post

Subject: Giant wasp…borrows in tree giving birth? WTB?
Location: West Chester, Pennsylvania
September 4, 2015 4:22 am
I live in West Chester, Pa, and took these photos on September 3rd, 2015. They were taken in my backyard, on a dead tree…that I am in process of removing. I noticed this very large wasp looking insect, it was 2inches I length….I know because I measured it. It was near the base of the tree and looked like it was searching for something. I watched as it found a location and a long black “leg” like thing injected itself into the tree bark . I know it was not a leg because all of the insects legs were yellow and this was black, thinner and was being pushed into the tree. The insect started moving its body back and forth and the black “leg” got shorter and shorter until it was almost not even seen. It stayed there for at least a half an hour and when I came back out side it had moved itself to another part of the tree and was doing the whole process over again. Now, I am assuming it was putting its eggs into the tree bark. I love insects and ha ve never seen a bug this long, or a stinger this long, could you tell me what bug this is? Thanks for your time and your help!
Signature: J Hartz

Pigeon Horntail Ovipositing

Pigeon Horntail Ovipositing

Dear J Hartz,
Thanks so much for submitting your excellent images and detailed account of this Pigeon Horntail,
Tremex columba, in the act of ovipositing.  Your speculation is quite accurate.  Pigeon Horntails are Wood Wasps whose larvae tunnel in and feed on dead wood of deciduous trees.

PIgeon Horntail Ovipositing

PIgeon Horntail Ovipositing

Thanks so much for the information! I love looking at all types of insects and studying their life cycle.   You have a great websites and it is very helpful, keep up the great work!
Sincerely-
J Hartz

PIgeon Horntail Ovipositing

PIgeon Horntail Ovipositing

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post

Subject: Very unusual
Location: Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates
September 4, 2015 4:30 am
This insect is very odd, is it a spider?
Signature: Gavin

Solifugid

Solifugid

Hi Gavin,
Though it is common called a Sun Spider in North America and a Camel Spider in the Middle East, this Arachnid is not a true spider, but a Solifugid, a member of the order Solifugae.  Though formidable predators, they are not dangerous to humans as they do not have venom.

 

Jessica M. Schemm, Jennifer Edelman, Diana Yochem liked this post