Woman lies in agony with broken hip FIVE MINUTES from ambulance station - and is only helped when crew are sent from town 30 MILES away

  • Debbie Stafford tripped and fell as she walked in Machynlleth, Powys
  • 50-year-old fractured her hip and was left lying on the pavement
  • She was just five minutes from the town's ambulance station
  • But paramedics were sent from a town 30 miles away to help her 

Debbie Stafford was left lying five minutes from an ambulance station with a broken hip, while a crew was sent to her aid from 30 miles away

Debbie Stafford was left lying five minutes from an ambulance station with a broken hip, while a crew was sent to her aid from 30 miles away

A woman claims she was forced to lie in agony with a broken hip on a pavement for an hour, waiting for an ambulance to arrive from a town 30 miles away.

That is despite her falling just five minutes from the nearest ambulance station.

Debbie Stafford has criticised managers at the Welsh Ambulance Service for the delay.

She tripped and fractured her hip while walking in the town of Machynlleth, Powys on March 28.

But she was left to wait on the cold pavement for an ambulance from Llanidloes, Powys - 30 miles away.

While she praised the ambulance crew, she has criticised those in charge of the service, claiming they 'don't know the areas they're covering'. 

And she warned a similar delay for a pensioner could have proved fatal.

Ambulance chiefs dispute the length of time Ms Stafford was waiting, noting their logs reveal an crew arrived within 39 minutes.

They did, however, accept 39 minutes was outside the target time for a call of its type.

Ms Stafford said she was helped by a nearby resident, who covered her in a blanket and offered her a hot water bottle.

The 50-year-old, who is still on crutches and in pain following a full hip replacement, said she is angry that she was waiting for so long, despite lying just five minutes from Machynlleth's ambulance station.  

Town councillor Sylvia Rowlands told a council meeting that they needed to keep putting pressure on the ambulance service to ensure a proper service is provided in Machynlleth.

She said: 'It's something quite serious when there is an ambulance station and a lady is left to lie on the pavement for an hour.

'We need to keep pushing the ambulance service to get a better service.'

Ms Stafford added: 'The ambulance eventually came from Llanidloes.

'I had paramedics, the police and the fire brigade there and then an ambulance turned up.

'We only needed a helicopter for the full set.

'I couldn't be moved. All they could do was give me gas until the ambulance arrived, but that didn't help because of the pain I was in.' 

When the ambulance finally arrived, Ms Stafford said the crew had been apologetic for the delay and didn't understand why there was no ambulance cover closer by.

She said: 'The ambulance staff were brilliant. They couldn't apologise enough but it wasn't their fault.

'I don't think the managers know the areas they're covering properly.

'The NHS just seems to be falling apart. If that had been an elderly person that could have killed them.' 

The 50-year-old claims she was waiting an hour for an ambulance crew to reach her close to the Catholic church in Machynlleth, despite being just five minutes from the town's hospital, top. The Welsh Ambulance Service said their logs reveal the crew, who travelled 30 miles from Llanidloes, arrived within 39 minutes but conceded Ms Stafford waited longer than she should have for paramedics to arrive

The 50-year-old claims she was waiting an hour for an ambulance crew to reach her close to the Catholic church in Machynlleth, despite being just five minutes from the town's hospital, top. The Welsh Ambulance Service said their logs reveal the crew, who travelled 30 miles from Llanidloes, arrived within 39 minutes but conceded Ms Stafford waited longer than she should have for paramedics to arrive

A Welsh Ambulances Service spokeswoman said: 'The call was categorised as a 'green' call - serious but not immediately life-threatening.

'The trust aims to respond to 95 per cent of these calls within 30 minutes. The ambulance arrived on scene within 39 minutes, not the one hour as claimed.

'We would encourage the patient to contact the trust directly if she'd like to discuss what happened in more detail.' 

She added: 'It’s important to remember that as an ambulance service we do not provide care from station buildings. 

'They are used for staff to report to at the beginning of their shift and for the storage of vehicles and equipment.

'Even though there was an ambulance station nearby, it doesn’t necessarily mean there was a resource there available to respond. 

'As with all cases, we endeavour to send our nearest available, appropriate resource.'